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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 05-18-11, 05:24 AM   #1
MLKATO
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Dehyradration packs or water bottles? Or both?

What do you all do for when it comes time for a drink? Myself,I have stop,get off the bike and reach for my water bottle.I don't feel I'm agile enough to reach for the bottle and put back again without falling off. I'm also considering getting a Camelback for easier water access. I use to have a front pack that held two bottles of water on the handlebars. I need to see if I can find one of those again. What do you feel is the best source for water?
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Old 05-18-11, 05:37 AM   #2
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I've never felt the need for anything but a couple of water bottles.
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Old 05-18-11, 05:46 AM   #3
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Water bottles on a mountain bike = drinking from the muddy creek you just crossed

Just noticed "Dehyradration packs"....

Last edited by Ali_Pine; 05-18-11 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 05-18-11, 07:56 AM   #4
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Water bottles on a mountain bike = drinking from the muddy creek you just crossed
On mountain bikes, I used a camelback for that reason. That and as rough as the ride was sometimes, water bottles would occasionally pop out. For biking on the road, I prefer water bottles. The pack seems hot and uncomforatble. I guess on a mountain bike I never noticed it because it was always bumpy and your body was always moving around. However, on a road bike it is smooth, and your body stays pretty still and you start to notice every little thing (my watch is too tight, is my helmet strap too loose, is something making a noise..... - all of these things never crossed my mind when riding a trail).
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Old 05-18-11, 08:14 AM   #5
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I just use a water bottle or two. A pack would just be irritating and hot
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Old 05-18-11, 08:38 AM   #6
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What's best is what works best for you.

I used to think I would hate wearing a pack. When I toured across the country, I carried three bottles. Then I went to Spain for 7 weeks. It was very warm in the sun and water was not always readily available. As soon as I could, I bought a Camelback. I didn't mind it on my back in the least. While I use bottle for road rides, I tour with two bottles and a Camelback. Having both saves on trips to the water spigot, which may be a distance from the campsite.

If you go the Camelback route, I would not use it for anything other than water.
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Old 05-18-11, 09:11 AM   #7
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I have both. Camelback for MTB or a long road ride with few places to get water. Bottles on the road or a quick easy MTB ride.

I prefer the bottles, it's more comfortable, but the camelback is not bad and it gives you space to stash all kinds of things. I have lost bottles due to ejection on the MTB, and I have drank mud on the MTB too.

Drinking from bottles while riding just takes practice.
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Old 05-18-11, 09:23 AM   #8
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I have a big Camelback that I use for MTB. 100oz plus many tools, snacks, etc. -- holds everything.

For road I use water bottles (you'll get better at it over time) but I do have a smaller (70oz) Camelback that I use when it's hot.
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Old 05-18-11, 09:36 AM   #9
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I looked at some Camelbaks this week and noticed some have a mesh web and raised cushions to allow air to circulate around your back. Not as bad as the old ones that sat on your back and gave you no circulation, but not like wearing nothing at all. Anyway, I use a Camelbak for mtbing to hold tools, snacks and water. Same for long rides w/ few water sources or if I don't want to stop often to refill my water bottles. For shorter rides, I use a water bottle. I also use the Camelbak for hiking and sightseeing when I travel.
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Old 05-18-11, 10:18 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by MLKATO View Post
What do you all do for when it comes time for a drink? Myself,I have stop,get off the bike and reach for my water bottle.I don't feel I'm agile enough to reach for the bottle and put back again without falling off. I'm also considering getting a Camelback for easier water access. I use to have a front pack that held two bottles of water on the handlebars. I need to see if I can find one of those again. What do you feel is the best source for water?
I use a Camelbak and bottles. I tend to grab the front wheel, so I drink from the bottle at red lights/breaks and the Camelbak during the ride.

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I looked at some Camelbaks this week and noticed some have a mesh web and raised cushions to allow air to circulate around your back. Not as bad as the old ones that sat on your back and gave you no circulation, but not like wearing nothing at all. Anyway, I use a Camelbak for mtbing to hold tools, snacks and water. Same for long rides w/ few water sources or if I don't want to stop often to refill my water bottles. For shorter rides, I use a water bottle. I also use the Camelbak for hiking and sightseeing when I travel.
Camelbaks and the generic version sold at Target etc have improved greatly since I was first issued one. I've ridden with and without and I got the same large wet spot on my back, so I ride with. It doesn't hurt to have an extra 70 oz in my case.
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Old 05-18-11, 10:23 AM   #11
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Just learn to ride with no hands. You could juggle your waterbottles if you wanted. Also good for removing a jacket, removing the helmet while looking for that bee that just flew into the vent, cleaning the sunglasses, checking the batteries in your camera, opening a powerbar, or even handing the money over to the wife.

2-3 Waterbottles or DE-hdration pack on long solo isolated rides.
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Old 05-18-11, 01:44 PM   #12
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I feel a bit unstable reaching for bottles too so I use a camelbak. I bought a M.U.L.E. about 10 years ago for mountain biking and never looked back. I'm still using the same pack. I tried to take it on a day hike last week and it's just not comfortable for hiking, but great on a bike, probably because it's much less gear. I'm currently looking foe a hydration compatible day pack for my next hike.
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Old 05-18-11, 02:12 PM   #13
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I feel a bit unstable reaching for bottles too so I use a camelbak. I bought a M.U.L.E. about 10 years ago for mountain biking and never looked back. I'm still using the same pack. I tried to take it on a day hike last week and it's just not comfortable for hiking, but great on a bike, probably because it's much less gear. I'm currently looking foe a hydration compatible day pack for my next hike.
My bad,I don't know why I added the De in front of hydration,I guess it was because I was looking at my dehydrator.I like the idea of using both,better to be safe than sorry.
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Old 05-18-11, 05:06 PM   #14
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Water bottles on a mountain bike = drinking from the muddy creek you just crossed
I have a few bottles that have covers for the mouth piece. That's an option.
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Old 05-18-11, 05:37 PM   #15
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I've just gotten a camelback for longer rides. But even with it, I'm using 2 water bottles, one for Gatorade, one for Perpetuum, so the camelbak is JUST water.
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Old 05-21-11, 01:29 AM   #16
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I use a 3-speed with northroad bars on the dirt, and I put a handlebar mount which makes grabbing the water bottle a lot easier.

I think the main difference between road and mountain bikes is the tiller effect: Because you're using wider bars, any movement is going to be exaggerated. I can easily grab the bottle from the frame mount of my road bike, but reaching for anything like that on the 3-speed or my hybrid is all but impossible without going all over the road.
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