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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-08-11, 07:23 PM   #1
Brutal.Roadrnr
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This clyde has BAR ENDS!

I started cycling with a mountain bike, because...honestly...I couldn't afford a road bike. Besides, I was just going to get hot and tired and quit anyway, so why bother putting down all that money on something that was just going to rot away in the corner.

Well it has been a month so I went out and bought a pair of Giant Ergo bar ends. I am sick of my hands going numb on me and I heard they help on climbing...somehow?

Well a 2 day break due to 100+ degree temps and a pair of bar ends later and my average speed went from 12.0 to 12.6 mph!

I find myself leaning forward on hills...and there are so many hills...I suppose that is how you use them? But I can't deny the notable speed increase that came after I put them on.

To all those here, thanks for all the advice, support, and motivation.
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Old 06-08-11, 07:52 PM   #2
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I love my bar ends! I've been using them on mountain bikes since the early 90s, and both of the hybrids I purchased last year. They really do seem to help on climbs. I find myself using them 99% of the time while climbing in the saddle and 100% of the time when out of the saddle. It's just like riding on the hoods on a road bike, which is my favorite hand position on my road bike. Having the extra hand positions is much more comfortable too.

I even put a set of short bar ends on my Dahon Speed D7 folding bike.
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Old 06-08-11, 07:58 PM   #3
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I like barends most of the time! I usually climb with my hands on the flat bar actually, unless it's a quick sprint climb.

Controls on the barends by Lester Of Puppets, on Flickr
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Old 06-09-11, 07:24 AM   #4
CJ C
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instead of bar ends why dont people use bullhorn bars? they seem more fluid and will allow the same hand positions right?
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Old 06-09-11, 08:43 AM   #5
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Most bullhorns have road bar grip diameter which is a bit larger than MTB grip diameter. Some MTB shifters and brakes can be made to fit roadbar diameter with a bit of futzing.

Then of course one could eBay some Scott AT-2 bars for MTB bullhorn action.
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Old 06-09-11, 10:07 AM   #6
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I find myself leaning forward on hills...and there are so many hills...I suppose that is how you use them? But I can't deny the notable speed increase that came after I put them on.

To all those here, thanks for all the advice, support, and motivation.
I cannot ride without them in fact I started thinking about stock piling sets when the riser bar fad started a few years back.

Besides the additional hand positions it was my understanding that you're supposed to set the angle of the bar end by laying a yardstick on the top of the back tire and then across the top of the bars, the bar ends should then be adjusted to match the angle of the yardstick. As you climb in the saddle you should be pulling back on toward you on the bar ends essentially sending more force to the rear wheel and ultimately the ground. I found the technique incredibly effective especially on long climbs through the loose stuff.
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Old 06-09-11, 10:17 AM   #7
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Besides the additional hand positions it was my understanding that you're supposed to set the angle of the bar end by laying a yardstick on the top of the back tire and then across the top of the bars, the bar ends should then be adjusted to match the angle of the yardstick. As you climb in the saddle you should be pulling back on toward you on the bar ends essentially sending more force to the rear wheel and ultimately the ground. I found the technique incredibly effective especially on long climbs through the loose stuff.
That sounds like how I climb with them. As for the angle, here's a couple of my bikes showing how I always keep them adjusted.


Dahon Speed D7 by kittyz202, on Flickr


my Specialized Sirrus at top of Mt Vernon Road by kittyz202, on Flickr
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Old 06-09-11, 07:16 PM   #8
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I recently put some Ergon GC3 grips on my 2010 Trek 7.5FX and really do like them. The extra hand positions and leverage for hills is really nice.
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Old 06-09-11, 07:20 PM   #9
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I was really glad I had bar ends on my Trek 7000 on today's ride. The stock grips suck and make my hands hurt after a while, so I move my hands to the bar ends. They're more comfortable anyway.

We won't talk about the heat-induced bonk that started coming on a few miles from home.
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Old 06-10-11, 01:11 AM   #10
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I cannot ride without them in fact I started thinking about stock piling sets when the riser bar fad started a few years back.
I have bar ends on my riser bars!!

...is that so wrong...????

(...o.k.... so my commuter does look like an antelope.....)
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Old 06-10-11, 11:10 AM   #11
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that you're supposed to set the angle of the bar end by laying a yardstick on the top of the back tire and then across the top of the bars, the bar ends should then be adjusted to match the angle of the yardstick.
That's just about the way I have mine set up. Very effective on long steep dirt climbs.

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Old 06-11-11, 10:54 PM   #12
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I just bought Ergon grips with bar ends for my mountain/only bike. I bought them because on our relatively short 10 mile rides, I was getting a lot of hand numbness and general discomfort. They help a LOT! My husband and I just started riding and are slowly losing weight together. I am far far away from even wanting to be fast enough to have a road bike, and bar ends are a great way to get those different positions for those of us who need to sit more upright.

Really, it is whatever keeps us riding that is important, right?!
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Old 06-12-11, 05:59 AM   #13
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My bar ends:

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Old 06-12-11, 06:19 AM   #14
LesterOfPuppets
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I reckon this thread needs a pic of the vaunted Scott AT-2:

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Old 06-12-11, 06:26 AM   #15
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I'm thinking of getting these:

http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Pro-Pu...7881514&sr=8-1

Do they simply attach over the handlebar grips or do I have to remove the grips? And will I have to move my shifters/brakes inward more to make room? I'm not sure how these work...
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Old 06-12-11, 06:27 AM   #16
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I'm still waiting to hear about the " quick sprint climbs" !
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Old 06-12-11, 09:02 AM   #17
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I'm thinking of getting these:

http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Pro-Pu...7881514&sr=8-1

Do they simply attach over the handlebar grips or do I have to remove the grips? And will I have to move my shifters/brakes inward more to make room? I'm not sure how these work...
I sliced off the very edge of the rubber hand grip so that you can slide it on the handlebar toward the stem. Try to cut only the edge as you want to keep the grip as full as possible or you limit the hand space on the grip. My hands take the whole grip so I couldn't afford to lose any space.

Then loosen the bolt on the shifter/brakes to slide them in toward the stem also. Only slide far enough to allow for the 1/2 inch or so needed for the bar ends to attach. The grips are in a slightly more inward position but most of your time will be spent on the bar ends so it's actually a wider grip, more comfy.
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Old 06-12-11, 09:24 AM   #18
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I sliced off the very edge of the rubber hand grip so that you can slide it on the handlebar toward the stem. Try to cut only the edge as you want to keep the grip as full as possible or you limit the hand space on the grip. My hands take the whole grip so I couldn't afford to lose any space.

Then loosen the bolt on the shifter/brakes to slide them in toward the stem also. Only slide far enough to allow for the 1/2 inch or so needed for the bar ends to attach. The grips are in a slightly more inward position but most of your time will be spent on the bar ends so it's actually a wider grip, more comfy.
I used to cut the grips to install them, but on my Trek 7000 I ended up with grips too short, so now I lift up the ends of the grips with a flathead screwdriver and squirt a little Windex in the gap between the grip and the handlebar. Do this at the top and bottom of the bar. This makes it much easier to slide the grips inwards 1/2" after loosening the brakes and shifters.
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Old 06-12-11, 09:49 AM   #19
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I used to cut the grips to install them, but on my Trek 7000 I ended up with grips too short, so now I lift up the ends of the grips with a flathead screwdriver and squirt a little Windex in the gap between the grip and the handlebar. Do this at the top and bottom of the bar. This makes it much easier to slide the grips inwards 1/2" after loosening the brakes and shifters.



Hmm, I cut mine from the end with an exacto knife (as opposed to the grip surface), not the side so no way will it make it shorter.

Cut from the end, you have two rubberlike quarters. I used them in a soda machine, ok not really

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