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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-11-11, 05:37 AM   #1
Cujo2811
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Clip in pedals vs reg cheapies

New to cycling, bought a bike last year and made some posts, had to postpone riding due to work scheduling 3rd shift. Anyway I bought reg pedals for the bike till I got used to how the bike handles and all, and want to put the clip ins on now.

What type of differance do y'all see in the change? I've been riding 16-20 mile clips lately at a Pace of 15 mph. Will the shoes help my avg speed? Thanks.
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Old 06-11-11, 06:24 AM   #2
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The pedals on your bike really serve only one purpose - as a means to transfer power from you to your bicycle. For riding around the block, they don't need to be very fancy... just plastic blocks with grooves or teeth to plant your feet onto. But if you want to go on longer rides (anything over 10 miles), you'll benefit greatly from something better, because:

Without something holding your foot securely to the pedal, it would be easy to slip off the pedal and send your foot into the wheel. Not so likely to happen on a trip around the block, but on a longer ride, when you're tired.

There is a correct placement for the position of your foot over the pedal axle

A good pedal/shoe system has to be able to transfer all of the power from your leg to the pedals without trying to bend your foot over the top of the pedal, which causes both fatigue and pain

You shouldn't have to think about how your feet connect to the bicycle while you're riding. You should be concentrating on having fun!
Taken from Caree.org

For me I had a dual pedal when I got my mountain bike, I had never used clipless pedals before but my bike had that as an option. I rode if for a day or two with regular shoes and could feel I had been off the bike to long. I bought some riding shoes with clips to see what the buzz was about. What a world of difference it makes to have your legs power the stroke coming and going. I noticed my quads burning when I was climbing and I knew I was getting the benefit of the upstroke too. I will not ride my bike without being clipped in, in fact I upgraded my pedals to be clipless only, no more dual pedal thing. Just remember to adjust your tension on the pedal so you can unclip when stopping or you might just fall over while being trapped to the pedal, I do it about once a month.
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Old 06-11-11, 08:25 AM   #3
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IMO clipless pedals will not alter your average speed very much. In my case, I just like the simplicity of platform pedals. Give them a try, it's the only way learn how they work for you.
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Old 06-11-11, 09:22 AM   #4
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They'll probably help a little bit but like all things cycling related, there's no magic bullet to add 2 mph to your average. For me, I find them much easier to use than say, toe clips. I never have to look at them to know where my foot is going and when it's in - it's in the right spot. Clipless pedals are also excellent when you're standing and climbing out of the saddle. You can really fling your bike around and not worry about the pedals.
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Old 06-11-11, 09:42 AM   #5
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No change to average speed. You might notice that clipless pedals make it easier to maintain a higher cadence, which some people find to make pedaling easier. I find that it's occasionally nice to be able to pull up on the pedals to give my quads some rest. Once you're used to them, clipless pedals are also much easier to engage; no more pedaling across an intersection (or down the street) with your toe clips dragging along the ground.
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Old 06-11-11, 01:51 PM   #6
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Be careful if you're bigger with some pedals. some pedals have a weight limit (egg-beaters, for example).
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Old 06-11-11, 10:41 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
No change to average speed. You might notice that clipless pedals make it easier to maintain a higher cadence, which some people find to make pedaling easier.
I disagree... The ease that you can maintain a higher, smoother cadence typically will increase your average speed. Helped my average speed, my cadence, my overall ride. The stepping stone to becoming a better rider.
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Old 06-12-11, 06:05 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by merkong View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
No change to average speed. You might notice that clipless pedals make it easier to maintain a higher cadence, which some people find to make pedaling easier.

I disagree... The ease that you can maintain a higher, smoother cadence typically will increase your average speed. Helped my average speed, my cadence, my overall ride. The stepping stone to becoming a better rider.
I'll be the judge of this in a week or so. I just ordered my first pair of clipless last week. As of now I have no difference between toeclips, and platform. Toeclips have too much flex in them to really help on the upstroke for me. I'm hoping that with the foot locked in I won't have this play at all, and with no play, then the upstroke will help all around.
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Old 06-12-11, 06:16 AM   #9
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Toeclips and straps, IMO, provide only marginal benefits in terms of adding pedaling efficiency. They'll help you keep your feet in the right spot, but not much more than that. Their greatest effectiveness was back in the days when riders used them in conjunction with cleats, and a firm, firm tightening down of the straps.
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Old 06-12-11, 06:39 AM   #10
Cujo2811
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Thanks for the input, I'll especially keep an eye on the weight limit, would never have thought of it. I think I may go with one of those combo pedals that clip in or you can just hop on n ride with sneakers, just incase I'm just running to the store or something. I'm intrested in seeing the cadance gain. Hopefully it will help work out the hamstrings a bit more.
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Old 06-12-11, 08:36 AM   #11
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Be careful if you're bigger with some pedals. some pedals have a weight limit (egg-beaters, for example).
Eggbeaters only have a weight limit if you buy the $425 titanium version. Pedals that the OP is likely to consider are unlikely to have a weight limit.
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