Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-20-11, 12:11 PM   #1
jgalak
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Long Island, NY
Bikes: Bianchi San Remo, Gary Fisher Marlin
Posts: 49
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pedal options

I'm thinking about clipless pedals and was trying to figure out the brands/models. My first thought was Shimano 105 (based mostly on the rep of the brand/model line), but a bunch of reviews I've seen suggest the Speedplay instead, saying they have more float. An experienced friend suggested I save my money and just get the Nasbar branded ones, as they are perfectly serviceable.

I know that when I pedal, I don't have perfect form - my knees tend to go outboard some at the top of the stroke, and back in at the bottom. Would float help keep my knees from loading up (a major concern for me)?

The other factor is weight - I'm almost 300lbs, are there any pedals I should stay away from weight-wise?

Thanks,
Juliean.
jgalak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:17 PM   #2
Mr Sinister
Am I evil? I am Man!!!
 
Mr Sinister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Mass.
Bikes:
Posts: 448
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just bought my first pair of Shimano Sp pedals, and I will tell you how they are for a first timer in a few days. As of now I have never used clipless, and have only used either platform, or toe clips. So in a few days, I can tell you from a 100% fresh perspective on how good or bad these pedals are, if you want. Just add me as a friend and I will PM you what I think. This is just in case I can't find this thread again.
Mr Sinister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:19 PM   #3
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"The other factor is weight - I'm almost 300lbs, are there any pedals I should stay away from weight-wise?"

Stay away from clip in or toe clips since you need full range of foot motion to be safe on a bike.

Any platform pedal on this page would serve you well at your current weight.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html

I have the rubber block pedals on my bike and they feel just right dampening road vibes under foot while ride!!!
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

Last edited by Nightshade; 06-20-11 at 12:22 PM.
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:21 PM   #4
CACycling
Senior Member
 
CACycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Bikes: '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX
Posts: 4,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
First decide what kind of shoes (road or mountain) then pick the pedals. I have Shimano SPD (mountain & commuting) and SPD-SL (road) and like them both. I've bought several pairs of off-brand pedals from various manufacturers. They are all in a box in the garage. IMHO, stick with the brand names, they really do work better.
CACycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:28 PM   #5
CraigB
Starting over
 
CraigB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: 1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
Posts: 4,081
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
After 30 years of using a couple of different models of Looks, I just got a pair of Nashbar Ventoux Mag 2 pedals for the new Cannondale. They had decent reviews and were condiderably less expensive, even compared to Shimano 105, which would have matched the bike's other components. When the bike comes home in a few weeks, I'll have a chance to try them and see if I can tell a difference.

Last edited by CraigB; 06-20-11 at 02:10 PM.
CraigB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:35 PM   #6
IAmCosmo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Roanoke, VA
Bikes:
Posts: 554
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I hate floating pedals, so I only consider fixed, so my advice may or may not be helpful. I have Shimano 105 on my bikes, and I like them, except they make a lot of noise. I tried for weeks to track down the source, and turns out there is a little plastic insert in the middle of the pedal. When that gets worn, the cleats touching it make a horrible popping and cracking sound on each pedal stroke. Supposedly you can replace that piece, but I can't find them anywhere.

I've heard nothing but good things about Speedplay, and now that they have a zero float model, I am seriously considering trying them.

At 300#, stay away from any of the light weight titanium or carbon pedals. Look at the low end of the range. The more expensive ones are lighter, so they use lighter materials. The performance is usually the same throughout the line though.
IAmCosmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:44 PM   #7
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
Posts: 5,427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I'm a big fan of shoes that I can actually walk it. I like Shimano's SPD mountain bike pedal system. I like Shimano's PD-M520 pedals. They're cheap (~$30-35 if you shop around), reliable, easy to clip into, and have adjustable release tension and a shallow release angle (which is great for clipless newbies). I used to think that I needed tons of float to keep my knees happy. Turns out that minimal float is fine... as long as my cleats are properly positioned.
sstorkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 12:48 PM   #8
Brando_T.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 450
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
for a first clipless pedal, I would probably recommend going with the SPD or Time style pedals in a walkable shoe as sstorkel says. I've used both, and liked the Time pedal slightly better because it had more float.

I just went to Speedplay because of knee problems. At somepoint in the last 15 years my knees need a bigger range of motion. While I like the speedplay pedals, my research is the opposite of of IAmCosmo - there are a number of potential issues with the pedals that I'll continue to monitor (lubing cleats, greasing pedals, ensuring screws don't drop out of the cleat, etc.). But for now, happiness.
Brando_T. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 01:00 PM   #9
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 13,717
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
The first question is whether you need road or mountain pedals, and you mostly answer that by figuring out how much you'll be walking from the point when you put the shoes on, until you take them off.
Seattle Forrest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 02:16 PM   #10
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,719
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
I have had good luck with what I think is a little known pedal: Look Graphite mtb pedals. They are double sided, and the float is in the cleat, and not the pedal. No adjustment or pressure screw on the pedal, and they come with two sets of cleats (15 and 20 degree if I remember correctly). No maintenance other than checking cleat screws, and they use mountain shoes so easy to walk. Down side is that they are not interchangeable with anything.

Once you get clipless, best thing for your knees is to check seat forward or back position. In forward crank position (crank arms parallel to ground), knee should be slightly behind pedal spindle axis. I've heard 0 to .5". Once its set, the cleats keep you in the same spot every time.
RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 02:31 PM   #11
jyossarian
SERENITY NOW!!!
 
jyossarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the 212
Bikes: Haro Vector, IRO Rob Roy, Bianchi Veloce
Posts: 8,756
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Will you need shims? If your knees stick out and your feet land at an angle to your existing pedals, you may need pedal shims so they can keep that angle.
__________________
HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!
jyossarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 02:35 PM   #12
pbd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 357
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Like others have mentioned, SPDs are a great place to start. Walkable shoes, double-sided is great for a beginner, easy-in/easy-out clipping with adjustable tension, decent float, inexpensive, extremely sturdy since they're designed for mountain biking and all the abuse that entails.

I've been using SPDs quite happily, I think they're a great place to start for a clipless beginner.
pbd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 04:25 PM   #13
jgalak
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Long Island, NY
Bikes: Bianchi San Remo, Gary Fisher Marlin
Posts: 49
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, just to clarify a few points - I've always biked with clips - just small toe clips (no strap) on my old hybrid, full clips (with strap) on my "new" road bike. This is for the road bike. I have no problems with clips, just never done the clipless thing...

As to MTB vs Road shoes - not really sure. Yeah, I'd like to be able to walk after/before riding - I guess that means MTB pedals/shoes. Is there a downside to MTB? Probably some weight, but is it significant?

I've tried bike shoes that were presumably road shoes (Shimano All Around Sport Shoe SH-R077) with no cleats installed to use with the clips, and they were very light and comfortable, but I couldn't keep my feet on the pedal even with the strap tightened down - they had so little traction that my foot slid right off the pedal (mostly into the gap between the front of the clip and the strap on one side).
jgalak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 04:35 PM   #14
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 13,717
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
I have a pair of mountain/SPD pedals that weigh less than a lot of road pedals. It depends which particular ones you get. Mine are one-sided, which helps keep the grams away. That isn't why I got them, but I was pleasantly surprised when I found that out.

The main downside to mountain pedals is they're smaller, and the cleat is smaller, so your point of meaningful contact is smaller. People tend to get "hot spots" as a result: areas on the bottoms of their feet, around where it makes contact with the pedal, that can get downright painful. Stiffer shoes can solve this, however. Carbon soled mountain shoes are very comfortable, and the only real downside I can see vs a (very expensive) road system is that you can't put a power meter into them.

I like A-520 pedals a lot:

Seattle Forrest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 08:51 PM   #15
beatsrunning
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Clovis, CA
Bikes: Windsor Fens
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I use Shimano 105 which are spd-sl. I started with spd as that is what came on my bike when new. I like the 105's much more than the originals. As for weight, I don't think it is an issue as I'm 340 now abd have been using them since I was about 360.

Also I bought them via ebay for less than 1/2 of what they are going retail.
beatsrunning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 09:18 PM   #16
jyossarian
SERENITY NOW!!!
 
jyossarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the 212
Bikes: Haro Vector, IRO Rob Roy, Bianchi Veloce
Posts: 8,756
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I use Candys. Super simple design, no tension screw to mess with, light and the mtb shoes are comfortable for walking around.
__________________
HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!
jyossarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 09:33 PM   #17
TrojanHorse 
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 11,190
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
I've used a number of different pedals over the years... had some crummy diadora pedals for a while, then look, then time (didn't care for either one, but this was in the 90s) then I got some speedplay X2s because my knees are shot and aaaaaaahhhhhhh. I just replaced the X2s with some Light Actions speedplays and I think I liked my older ones better, but they're both handy for letting your feet rotate around, if that's what you need.

The downside is the cleats are a PITA to walk in. I go barefoot if I have to walk. And of course, they're *#&$^ expensive.
TrojanHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-11, 09:33 PM   #18
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
Posts: 5,427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jyossarian View Post
I use Candys. Super simple design, no tension screw to mess with, light and the mtb shoes are comfortable for walking around.
The reason I switched away from Crank Brothers pedals was the difficulty of release. With the Candy, Eggbeater, etc. you have to twist your heel 15 or 20 degrees before the pedal releases. With Shimano SPD pedals, I believe the release angle is something like 6 or 8 degrees. The release angle, combined with the adjustable release tension, makes SPD pedals perfect for someone who has never used clipless, IMHO.
sstorkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 08:51 AM   #19
jyossarian
SERENITY NOW!!!
 
jyossarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the 212
Bikes: Haro Vector, IRO Rob Roy, Bianchi Veloce
Posts: 8,756
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I went opposite to you. I started off w/ SPDs and switched to Candys b/c of the extra float and the lack of a tension screw. Once the cleat wears a little, it was easy to accidentally unclip by pulling up. You either had to tighten the screw or replace the cleat. If you pull up w/ Candys, they lock in tighter so less accidental unclippings. Accidental unclipping is not usually a big deal unless you're accelerating/sprinting or doing a fixed gear skid, both of which I was doing when accidentally unclipping from SPDs.
__________________
HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!
jyossarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 10:05 AM   #20
DTSCDS
"Fred"--is that bad?
 
DTSCDS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: 214 Represent!
Bikes: Felt f85 (11); Trek 7.3 FX (07); Schwinn Super Sport (86); Specialized Rockhopper (87)
Posts: 513
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For a first try at clip/cleat pedals I would agree with the idea of the SPD/platform pedals like these. I prefer the SPD-SL (Shiman 105's are what I am using) but I think they take a little more commitment than the plain SPD. You will have a more versatile shoe with the MTB type pedals. The Speedplay/SPD-SL/Look type cleats make walking much more of an adventure.
One more benefit to the SPD/platform combo pedals is it MIGHT allow Nightshade to sleep at night knowing that at least PART of your pedal is not determined to kill you!

Last edited by DTSCDS; 06-21-11 at 10:25 AM.
DTSCDS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 11:17 AM   #21
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTSCDS View Post
One more benefit to the SPD/platform combo pedals is it MIGHT allow Nightshade to sleep at night knowing that at least PART of your pedal is not determined to kill you!
Debating aside.......Over time how many cyclist have been hurt, suffered broken bones or death due to clip in's or toe clips?? Many I can assure you.

As long as a rider is tethered to his bike any fall will generate injury due to the clips if the rider can't get free of the bike to roll away from the bike.

Clip in's or toe clips increase the chance of injury by a factor of 100% in real world riding.

If you race cycles then clip in's & toe clips are required to compete but racing by it's very nature is dangerous. Clip in's & toe clips have no place in street riding. No place at all...........
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

Last edited by Nightshade; 06-21-11 at 11:22 AM.
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 11:28 AM   #22
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
Posts: 5,427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jyossarian View Post
Once the cleat wears a little, it was easy to accidentally unclip by pulling up.
I can generate 1000w of power during an all-out sprint. I've never managed to pull loose from my SPD pedals when using the standard SH51 cleat. I tighten the tension adjustment screw about once a year.

Accidental release may be more likely with the SH56 "multi-release" cleat. They can be great for beginners who have trouble getting the standard SH51 cleat to release, but I wouldn't recommend them for people who like to pull up with a lot of force...
sstorkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 11:31 AM   #23
CraigB
Starting over
 
CraigB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: 1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
Posts: 4,081
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to say that with all due respect I disagree completely with Nightshade on this topic.
CraigB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 11:46 AM   #24
jyossarian
SERENITY NOW!!!
 
jyossarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the 212
Bikes: Haro Vector, IRO Rob Roy, Bianchi Veloce
Posts: 8,756
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
I can generate 1000w of power during an all-out sprint. I've never managed to pull loose from my SPD pedals when using the standard SH51 cleat. I tighten the tension adjustment screw about once a year.

Accidental release may be more likely with the SH56 "multi-release" cleat. They can be great for beginners who have trouble getting the standard SH51 cleat to release, but I wouldn't recommend them for people who like to pull up with a lot of force...
I used the multi release cleat because I was commuting with lots of clip in/outs and I liked the float. I also had trouble clearing mud from SPDs and rode 1/2 a cross race w/o being clipped in. You like your pedals and I like mine. Both of us are right and neither of us are the OP so what works for him might be Look Keo or Time ATAC and nothing we suggest.

And yeah, I don't know where Nightshade got his numbers from, but I don't agree w/ his opinion.
__________________
HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!
jyossarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-11, 11:54 AM   #25
jmeissner
Senior Member
 
jmeissner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 125
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigB View Post
I have to say that with all due respect I disagree completely with Nightshade on this topic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jyossarian View Post
And yeah, I don't know where Nightshade got his numbers from, but I don't agree w/ his opinion.
I am not sure why Nightshade is so anti-clipless and I also disagree completely.

I use double sided SPD pedals on my mountain bike when riding trails and SPD-SL (shimano 105s) when on my road bike. I have had a number of impressive bails while riding fairly technical trails and never had even minor injuries due to the pedals. It is nice to have double sided cleats if you are going to be clipping in and out often as it is a bit quicker.
jmeissner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:53 PM.