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  1. #1
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    Attention All Clydesdales, Time to be Heard!

    Hello Fellow Cyclists,

    I need your Opinions, Thoughts and Concerns when it comes to the bikes you ride. I work for a company that currently has a large customer basis in clyde/athena market. We are planning on producing a specialty bike that can handle a 450 lb rider. I have done plenty of research, much of it thanks to this very forum. Which is why I want to hear what you have to say.

    Here is a basic outline of the bike:
    Thick Wall Tubing CroMoly Frame 18",21",24"
    Braze-Ons for Racks, Fenders and Waterbottle Cages
    700c Wheels with F36h and R40h Hubs
    Puncture Resistant 45c Tires
    24 speed Shimano Drivetrain
    Disc Brakes F and R
    Heavy Duty Steel Seatpost, Stem and Handlebars
    Large Gel Saddle
    Dual Density Ergonomic Grips


    This is your chance to put your opinion out there to directly influence a bike that you might ride in the future. Feel free to put any idea out there. Experiences, Dream Bikes, Features, Annoying Mishaps, Details ETC...

    If anyone would prefer to respond in private feel free to message me on this forum's personal message feature.

    Thanks In Advance,

    Ted

  2. #2
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    1.) No suspension fork
    2.) Deore deraileurs
    3.) 35 mm tires
    4.) Brooks B17 saddle

  3. #3
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    Hello, and welcome.
    Since this is your first post, I'd like to hear more about where you are coming from before I jump into your project. No offense.
    __________________________________________________________________
    Shrinking steadily

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the input jethro56. The bike is going to have a rigid steel fork most similar to the Surly Big Dummy with the rack mounts and plenty of clearance for a set of fenders. The deore derailleurs are a definite possibility as are the 35c tires. The brooks saddle is more of a personal choice and at its cost it will likely be a post-purchase upgrade by the cyclist.

    Hello Boyd Reynolds, No offense taken. I'm sure my one post status might seem ominous! My main goal is to design a bicycle that will meet the needs of a cyclist weighing between 200 and 450 lbs without breaking the bank or resorting to inferior parts that could fail under the increased stress. This is by no means a plug for my company which is why I used my personal account to post. After reading on this forum for the last few months, I have noticed a few common denominators when it comes to bicycle component failures and successes. One good example is the wheel set, I have seen many posts dealing with wheel set issues and solutions. There is a growing population that wants to ride but have factors that hold them back, I don't want a proper bike to be one of them. To sum it up, I want the opinions of the people who ride their bikes to get healthy and have fun.
    Last edited by psyloki; 07-06-11 at 08:40 AM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sundance89's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyloki View Post

    Hello Boyd Reynolds, No offense taken. I'm sure my one post status might seem ominous! My main goal is to design a bicycle that will meet the needs of a cyclist weighing between 200 and 450 lbs without breaking the bank or resorting to inferior parts that could fail under the increased stress. This is by no means a plug for my company which is why I used my personal account to post. After reading on this forum for the last few months, I have noticed a few common denominators when it comes to bicycle component failures and successes. One good example is the wheel set, I have seen many posts dealing with wheel set issues and solutions. There is a growing population that wants to ride but have factors that hold them back, I don't want a proper bike to one of them. To sum it up, I want the opinions of the people who ride their bikes to get healthy and have fun.
    No, by all means - plug your company. Who are you? - everything. You can answer my direct question so no rules are broken. Being in the business, I would imagine the answers you are seeking here must be blah blah blah. They are for us because it's pretty simple. A frame and wheel set that can handle the weight in geometries to fit tall riders. Pretty simple.

    But not Specialized, Trek, Bianchi, Fuji, etc., All of the big boy production companies since the eighties has given a darn about clydes - so who are you? That's certainly the more interesting question. It's also a bit of a coincidence that KHS has just released (hopefully) the first bike that does all of the above and there's a thread going about it?

  6. #6
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Specific comments:
    -"Thick Wall"- I don't know what this is, but normal steel bike frames seem to be adequate, so there's not necessarily a reason to go beefier.
    36/40 spoke- I got a 36-spoke warranty replacement wheel that lasted about 500 miles. Had a new wheel rebuilt on the same hub, have about 10,000 miles on it. Moral is that the combination of components and build quality is important, not just the spoke count. Also, any wheel built to be entirely adequate for every 450 lb rider will be overkill for 201 lb riders.
    45c Tires- My Sojourn came with 35's, check and see what the weight capacity is on the different tires.
    24- Speed- My Sojourn uses a triple in front, wide-range (11-34, I think) mountain-bike cassette in back. Those low gears can be very important for unfit people.
    Disc brakes- I have never seen any concensus, on Bikeforums or elsewhere, that disc brake were a better choice than rim brakes, or that disc brakes were better for heavier people, etc. They have advantages and disadvantages.
    I've never heard of anything good about "gel" stuff from cyclists that actually did much cycling.
    Not indicated is basic handlebar configuration- what works for 201 lb rider won't work for 450 lb rider and vice versa (ie, drop bars vs flat bars).
    You might consider the idea of making the rear frame wider so you can use tandem components on the bike.

    General comment: I'm not aware that bicycle components in general usually have a weight rating. Now, I assume that if you sell a seatpost with no specific weight rating, and an 800-lb person uses it and injures themselves, you have some sort of legal ground to say "Well, a reasonable person would have known you were too heavy for that seatpost so we're not liable." On the other hand, if you use a seatpost with no load rating, advertise the bike for 450 lb capacity, and then that seatpost breaks under a 440 lb rider, they could nail your hide to the wall in court. So that's a question to run by your lawyer prior to working out all the details.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  7. #7
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    I will play devil's advocate here. I believe Ted is just trying to protect his company's developing product by not divulging too many details about his company. I see no problem with this.

    The overall outline of the bike sounds pretty spot on. No doubt that this bike is going to be heavy, but if you are a 400+ lb rider, that is not at all and issue. I'd expect this to weigh somewhere in the 35-40 lb range. I echo the suggestion of a little narrower tire than 45c, but not too much. Maybe a 40c semi-slick like the Kenda Kross would work well. I think you want something with the least rolling resistance possible in a decent width to support a heavier rider.

    You mention using steel control components. I would think that and oversized 31.8mm handlebar/stem would be appropriate. I have also seen more bent steel seatposts than aluminum. I also get the impression that you were looking at a 2 piece steel post and I don't like using one of those seat clamps for a heavier rider. I would think a large diameter alloy post with two bolt head would work well. I think a 29.2 mm post would correlate well with a 34.9mm seat tube for the appropriate guage steel for this frame.

    My last concern is going to be the price. Even if you are able to economize by using generic (Kalloy) control parts and other budget items, I still see this price easily shooting above $600 for such a bike. You are going to have a hard time selling to a lot of people. The ones who are over 300 lbs may jump right in with one of these bikes knowing it is going to hold up to their weight, but I am also afraid many of the people in that weight range may also be hesitant spending that much money on a bike not knowing if they will be able to stick with it long enough to justify the cost. There are plenty of $400 bikes out there that someone can go buy, ride for a while, and maybe end up spending $150 on a rear wheel with more spokes. There are a lot of people who just don't have $600 to spend all at once. I also think that those who are under 300 lbs may not see the value when there are a lot of bikes out there that can hold up to someone this size reasonably well. I am 227 lbs now, down from 265, and even at my former weight I never thought I was too heavy for all by the lightest of bikes.

    My feeling is that had an untapped market for such bikes existed, one of the big brands would have tapped it already. The Specializeds, Treks, and Giants of the work have very large marketing budgets that allow them to conduct such product research.

  8. #8
    Senior Member 1oddmanout's Avatar
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    As an option, 8 speed 35-95 gear inches - no need for more. Big Apple tires. Not necessarily more spokes, but stronger spokes.
    Imagine a country where the schools have all the money they need and the Air Force has to conduct a bake sale to buy a bomber.

  9. #9
    Retired C.O. RandoneeRider's Avatar
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    I'm a newbie, and I know virtually NOTHING about bicycles.....
    save for what I've read on the Internet and questions answered by friends, strangers, and salesmen. The problem with salesmen is that they will INSIST that the bike they're selling is up to the task of supporting folk like me who are heavier than "normal". Had I seen a line of bicycles actually designed those of us who are heavier, my interest would have been piqued. Instead, I concluded that a "touring" road bike was going to be a better gamble for me.

    * Big folks for whom you wanna design a bicycle, won't have the flexibility to reach for drop-down bars. But I wanted a bike that looked the part while planning someday to be able to reach my lower bars. Adjustable bars (rather than race oriented) might have been a good pitch to give me when I was looking for a bike.

    * Dual brake levers, with one set on the upper handlebar might have prevented me from coasting into the rear wheel of a buddy's bike..... Us larger folk may not be as quick & nimble as we would like to be.

    * Because I have been playing with my saddle height, it's angle, etc.... I've found that I've had to tighten things more than the advised torque settings. It would be nice if heavy duty hardware were put into place for those of us who want/NEED to really torque things down.

    * As a fat older guy who hasn't been on a bicycle for over 35 years, I didn't want to be bothered with flat tires..... of which I've had two in the first month of ownership. I paid $70 to have my "puncture resistant" innertubes replaced with some super heavy-duty THICK innertubes and high-tech tire liners (not Slime.... it didn't prevent one of my punctures in that first month).

    * And how about an insulated top box on the lugguge rack to carry my Subway sammich, Snickers, and a bottle of red.

  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyloki View Post
    If anyone would prefer to respond in private feel free to message me on this forum's personal message feature.
    If I send a personal message via the forums feature, will you make sure I get a response?

  11. #11
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    One issue I've been having lately is the seatpost. It seems to slide back into the tube pretty easily. I'm not even using a quickrelease on it; just a plain bolt and nut with washers. I've stripped several bolts overtightening it in the past. Perhaps this is an issue you might focus on.


    As for the large gel seat... I'm not so sure that's a good idea. Sure people are tricked into thinking that's a good idea, and it may even be ok for cruiser style bikes, but in general you want a more sturdy saddle. That opens another can of worms as well: what kind of handlebars? Cruiser? Flat? Drops?

    I think you should probably get a better idea of what sub-category you want to target; People over 200lbs is a pretty diverse group with many differing styles and preferences.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Profgumby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyloki View Post
    Hello Fellow Cyclists,

    I need your Opinions, Thoughts and Concerns when it comes to the bikes you ride. I work for a company that currently has a large customer basis in clyde/athena market. We are planning on producing a specialty bike that can handle a 450 lb rider. I have done plenty of research, much of it thanks to this very forum. Which is why I want to hear what you have to say.

    Here is a basic outline of the bike:
    Thick Wall Tubing CroMoly Frame 18",21",24"
    Braze-Ons for Racks, Fenders and Waterbottle Cages
    700c Wheels with F36h and R40h Hubs
    Puncture Resistant 45c Tires
    24 speed Shimano Drivetrain
    Disc Brakes F and R
    Heavy Duty Steel Seatpost, Stem and Handlebars
    Large Gel Saddle
    Dual Density Ergonomic Grips


    This is your chance to put your opinion out there to directly influence a bike that you might ride in the future. Feel free to put any idea out there. Experiences, Dream Bikes, Features, Annoying Mishaps, Details ETC...

    If anyone would prefer to respond in private feel free to message me on this forum's personal message feature.

    Thanks In Advance,

    Ted
    Please, for the love of God, use at least 36h rims and beefy ones at that! My experience has been that most stock rims are total shiite for a clyde! And no need for a saddle that looks like a couch, but something better than what feels like a 2x4 on edge! many clydes have wider sit bones and the standard saddles also stink.

    Also I agree with no suspension anything! Deore or better derailleurs, as for rubber please, not some low end made garbage like many stock tires mounted on most bikes. the stock Kendas that came on my Giant Sedona were pure crap. I scrubbed the shoulders off 3 tires in 2 years due to the weak sidewall. Kenda themselves told me the tires were ****, I mean, entry level. Don't skimp on the rubber, it does not cost much more for good tires, nor will it significantly raise the retail price of the bike. And please do not "sock it to" the customer with the price of this bike. I know it is a substantial bike and the price may be more than the normal bike for lightweight folks. You know the bike that is ridden 4 times and sits in the garage....

    Consider too please a road bike frame and that which you listed. See, some of us would be a Clyde, even if we were underweight! My ideal weight is somewhere in the 240lb range and I am 5'11"! Yes we are out there, Linebackers want to ride bikes too you know....

    I feel the time has come for bike manufacturers to consider we are not all Lance Armstrong, nor do we ride the tour. But some of us ride a heck of a lot more than the average guy! I don't need a 19 pound road bike! I need a bike that can handle a REAL sized person and still not suffer in performance. I also do not want to be relegated to a, sit bolt upright, easy geared lifestyle/hybrid bike for fat folks. Some Clydes rifde harder and faster and more often than skinny minnies. And we do Century rides and tours. Why do we have to be stuck on a bike we have to fight, even if it can support the weight. I am sick of riding the bike equivalent of a Yugo at a NASCAR race...

    You could also produce said bike in the sub $1,000 range or thereabouts I am sure..... If you are going to do this, do it right and do it so the average Joe can afford the bike and not have to change everything that is not the frame or handlebars. I wish my LeTour had better wheels and pedals! And skip the dry spaghetti spokes! look up the retail of the LeTour Classic, then add 600 more for rims and tires that I don't have a problem with spending, but I don't think I should have to spend that to get a brand new bike to work for me. (Nor should any Clyde or Athena)

    So far the saddle, the pedals and the rims are gone off the stock road bike. A story repeated on every new bike I have purchased in the last few years (other than my mountain bikes)

    And please keep us informed on this(these) bikes. I'd buy one in a heartbeat!
    Last edited by Profgumby; 07-06-11 at 07:59 AM.
    No, really! I meant to skip off that rock, bounce off that tree and face plant in the creek!
    I falled down!

  13. #13
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    My only input, because as a somewhat smaller clyde I've been lucky to not have to deal with the "wear and tear" factor issues, is to make the bike strong enough to support larger folks, without making them feel like it's a "fat person's" bike. If that makes sense.

    I personally think, and this is just my opinion, that one of the barriers to entry for clydes/athenas is the mental aspect of it. There's a certain amount of embarrassment about being a big person on a bike that often keeps us from riding to save our lives even though that's absolutely what we must do.

    The fact of the matter is even though we're larger people, we WANT to be athletes.

    Our bikes should help us feel like athletes.

  14. #14
    I Ride, Therefore I Am BigUgly's Avatar
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    I second the stronger spokes as I had to replace the stock wheel on my Lemond within the first year(it was a brand new bike). Also, locate the shifters someplace easy for a clyde to get to. Not on the bar ends like the Surly LHT or the down tube. A location easy for a non flexible clyde to deal with. Are you putting drops on this bike or a flat handle bar?
    Don't worry, relax, ride and have fun.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    What is your warranty going to look like? I have a carbon fiber racing bike. It developed a crack in the seat tube. The company that made it replaced the frame free of charge. Your target market can't always ride bikes from the local store, and is worried about breaking anything they get on, so a warranty might help you appeal to people who are interested in bikes, but concerned about their weight being supported.

    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    Disc brakes- I have never seen any concensus, on Bikeforums or elsewhere, that disc brake were a better choice than rim brakes, or that disc brakes were better for heavier people, etc. They have advantages and disadvantages.
    They give much more consistent stopping power/distance in the rain; now it's up to your tires and not your pads and how much water is on your rims. Very easy to adjust, and it can be that an out-of-true wheel doesn't cause problems with them. On the other hand, when you kill a wheel, you can't just walk into any shop and leave with a new one. This has been a pain in my ass for a couple weeks now.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  16. #16
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    A Big Thanks goes out to everyone who posted in response . I emailed the moderator for this forum page and asked if he would allow me to receive PMs even though I do not have 50 posts so hopefully anyone who sent me one will get a response (thanks Mr. Beanz).

    Sundance89, Depending on how the moderator Tom takes this thread I will release the company information. We certainly are not one of the "big boys" of bikes. This is going to be one bike of four in our market launch.

    StephenH, The wall thickness of steel bike frames is the amount of material you have when Outside Tube Diameter and Inside Tube Diameter are subtracted. The thicker the wall the stronger the tube is, given the same outside diameter. The disc brakes are development that I felt would resist heat build up and be less affected by outside factors such as rain, snow and mud. Consistent stopping power. The bike will have flat bars with a slight rise to raise the body into a more comfortable position.

    flippin_bikes, I appreciate your knowledge on the tires and control components. In terms of price this bike will be above $600. I know that most people won't need this type of structural stability and would rather save on cost but this bike isn't for most people. It's a fine line between making a very strong bike and over engineering in this case.

    RandoneeRider, This bike is designed for larger riders and every component has been chosen to support that cause. No salesman pitch here, just a well developed idea. The bike will have flat bars with a slight rise, trigger shifters and mountain bike style brake levers. All of which will be accessible without significant movement from the ergo grips. The bike will have braze-ons for luggage racks so I don't see any reason why you couldn't add a cooler for a nice picnic or a days worth of riding snacks.

    Mithrandir, Thank you for the seat post comment. I am going to work on a design that will hold the seat post firm in the seat tube. The group I am trying to cater to are people who cannot just go to the bike shop and pick a bike in the store. Mostly taller men weighing over 250 lbs.

    Profgumby, The wheel set is a major element to this bike. It will be standard on this bike as well as offered for sale by itself. The tires are going to be strong puncture resistant tires with a strong sidewall and width to accommodate the added weight. I agree with the statement about riding a bike out of the box. I plan on riding the first and every sample bike for a century or metric century on a local trail as soon as we get them to test its reliability. As for frame geometry, that is something that is still in the works.

    ill.clyde, thank you for your post. I am going to do my best do make a bike that satisfies the inner athlete in every clyde. Don't worry what others say about size and riding. Getting on the bike and riding is the best way to show people that you are an athlete.

    BigUgly, The spokes are going to be either double or triple butted 14g spokes laced to a 36h front and 40h rear hub. All of the wheels will be properly tensioned and trued for strength. The handle bar will be a flat bar with a slight rise with trigger shifters located next to the grips.

  17. #17
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyloki View Post
    My main goal is to design a bicycle that will meet the needs of a cyclist weighing between 200 and 450 lbs without breaking the bank or resorting to inferior parts that could fail under the increased stress.
    Consider narrowing your focus. My needs and preferences at the 200-250 range are WAY different than they would be at the 400-450 range.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  18. #18
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom View Post
    Consider narrowing your focus. My needs and preferences at the 200-250 range are WAY different than they would be at the 400-450 range.
    Exactly the point I was trying to make. For now, I'm at 350+, and I prefer flat handlebars because I find leaning over too far to be difficult with a gut in the way. But that gut has been slowly disappearing, and I find myself being able to lean lower and lower, and I'm actually considering getting a more racing-style bike in the near future now that I've become more addicted to speed and can feel the effects of wind on my massive bodice.

  19. #19
    Retired C.O. RandoneeRider's Avatar
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    Oh..... and one other thing.

    I stand a mere 5' 1" and weigh 236 lb's (255 a couple months ago before buying the bike), and built like a little troll/linebacker/fireplug/fat boy......

    I am not alone in standing a mere five feet..... in fact there are more women than men who are not tall enough for readily available 'quality' bicycles.

    I might suggest:
    If your company can't afford to offer very small ADULT bikes for the likes of my five-foot-one, at least consider a Small size line of bikes with a lower/angled "Euro" or "Unisex" top bar. I'm on an XS, and I come NOWHERE NEAR being able to stand (safely) over my top bar.

    I hope to lose quite a bit of weight by the time you will have come out with your bike. But priced in the neighborhood of $600 with half decent componants and disc brakes (heavy folks need good brakes), I may be in the market for a comfortable 'round-town bike......

  20. #20
    I am the Snail~! Peter_C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    They give much more consistent stopping power/distance in the rain; now it's up to your tires and not your pads and how much water is on your rims. Very easy to adjust, and it can be that an out-of-true wheel doesn't cause problems with them. On the other hand, when you kill a wheel, you can't just walk into any shop and leave with a new one. This has been a pain in my ass for a couple weeks now.
    AND, with Clydes, broken spokes or other issues, causing out-of-true wheels can sadly be an issue. So having great brakes (like BB7s) that work regardless of how true the rim is will be a bonus~!

    Kickstand or option
    Fenders or option
    Option for Big Apple tires (fit) 26X2.00 as an option? (stronger wheels?)
    Rear rack or option
    At least TWO water bottle holders or option
    Multiple handle-bar options - perhaps two different models based on the same bike?
    Perhaps Disc brake on one model?
    Peter_C
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  21. #21
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom View Post
    Consider narrowing your focus. My needs and preferences at the 200-250 range are WAY different than they would be at the 400-450 range.

    Dittos to this! I'm currently 240 and you'd never see me on a bike like that. Standard fame, components and quality 32 spoke wheels work great for me. Your model seem overkill in my weight range. You might be spot on for the upper weight ranges though.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  22. #22
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    24" is a bit small for a top end..that's...61cm? I'd suggest at least going up to 64cm or so.

  23. #23
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    You know, as long as you're making the bike indestructible, you might as well make sure it works well with heavy cargo hauling accessories. Make sure the standard pedals are alloy. You'll likely have market carryover from the Utility crowd who also expect to put a bajillion tons of load on their bikes, and likely want to stick longtails and things on the thing.
    Current stable: Sun Atlas X-type (mine), Trek Navigator 3 (wife), two Sun Revolution cruisers (wife, daughter)

  24. #24
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyloki View Post
    Hello Fellow Cyclists,

    I need your Opinions, Thoughts and Concerns ...snip...

    Here is a basic outline of the bike:
    Thick Wall Tubing CroMoly Frame 18",21",24"
    Braze-Ons for Racks, Fenders and Waterbottle Cages
    700c Wheels with F36h and R40h Hubs
    Puncture Resistant 45c Tires
    24 speed Shimano Drivetrain
    Disc Brakes F and R
    Heavy Duty Steel Seatpost, Stem and Handlebars
    Large Gel Saddle
    Dual Density Ergonomic Grips


    This is your chance to put your opinion out there to directly influence a bike that you might ride in the future. ...snip...
    So basically you're building the old Kona Hoss with a steel frame, rigid fork and 29er tires? Well you asked for my opinion and I will candidly deliver.

    Geometrically speaking, the diamond frame is extremely strong. Much stronger than any reasonable person could put it through in your target weight range. Where steel frames tend to fail is the welds. Thus, adding thick wall tubing adds no benefit to the bike as standard diameters are more than strong enough. Where you would benefit is investing time and money into the quality control on the welds. Thick tubes will only add to the weight of the bike. Heavy bikes take more effort to move, you want your bike to be as strong and light as you can to encourage riders to ride. If it’s a tank, it won’t be pleasant to ride and quickly be eliminated as a potential purchase during the test ride.

    I like your idea for Braze-Ons. Don’t forget the third set on the bottom of the down tube. It’s a really handy place to mount a frame pump.

    Good idea with the wheels.

    I’m not certain I like the idea with the 45c tires. Here is why: The wider a tire is in general, the lower PSI is can be inflated to. With super tubby tires, you’re probably looking in the 60 psi range, max. Much higher than that and you’ll blow the tire off the rim. With clydes, high PSI tires are fairly important as we are at a much greater risk of pinch flats. A pinch flat is when a sharp corner is ridden over (think the edge of a pothole) and the tire decompresses. The rim then makes contact with the tire casing pinching the tube. When the tube is pinched like that, it gets cut. I’d suggest instead a 700x32 rated around 100psi.

    24 speed? Why are you going with old 8 speed tech? Go for a nine speed (which is also old tech but plenty durable). Parts are easier to find in stores, maybe an 11-32 cassette with a long cage Deore LX.

    Disc Breaks…Could take them or leave them. Offer a model with and without.

    Heavy Duty seat post, probably a good idea. Stem and handlebars…not necessary. The rider’s weight shouldn’t be fully supported by their hands when they ride. All a steel stem and bar will do is add unnecessary weight while offering no benefit whatsoever in return.

    Large gel saddle…skip it. Saddles are such a personal choice anyways. A narrow saddle will be more comfortable over the long haul anyways. It’s a flat bar bike, so add nice bar ends to it. They don’t have to be heavy duty steel, either.

    Based on what I’ve read of your posts and your design criteria…you and whomever came up with this design don’t ride very much. You got good intentions, but a few critical flaws I pointed out above. What you’ve designed is the quintessential “fat-man” bike. Who is going to want to ride it when all they really have to do is pick out a regular production bike and swap in a new wheelset? All the other components are ok. Outside of spokes and wheels, clydes really don’t break anything any more frequently than the rest of the rides. Besides, Worksman Industrial Cycles have beat you to the punch. http://worksmancycles.com/shopsite_s.../indbikes.html

    I wouldn’t invest much money into this venture.

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    I am pleasantly surprised about the amount of feedback I am getting from this forum. Nice Work! On to the questions:

    chipcom, I agree, the bike is still in the design stage and the first working model is 7-8 months away so I have time to refine my work.

    Mithrandir/Homeyba, I am designing the bike for people who are primarily in the upper region of that range [250-450 lbs]. Most people in the lower section of that range can use a off the shelf bike with an upgraded wheel set. We are going to offer that wheel set as a separate purchase for people who are happy with the bike they already own but just want stronger rolling gear.

    RandoneeRider, Unfortunately, as you mentioned, we cannot afford to offer XS sizes in this bike. We are coming out with a comfort bike with a lowered top tube for an easier step through.

    Peter_C, I plan on having all of what you had mentioned avialable for sale with the bike. In addition the bike will have all of the proper braze-ons for such upgrades.

    EGUNWT, The 24" top end is a working model as of now. At 6'3" I do understand the difficulty in finding bikes that fit bigger people.

    JusticeZero, In addition to the braze-ons and endless combinations of rack options the heavy cargo hauling is a real possibility due to the strength of the frame and wheel set.

    bautieri, I like your thinking about the quality control on the welding. Although it is the area around the weld that tends to fail even with proper welding due to the heating and subsequent uncontrolled cooling that detempers the metal. Based on what I have read on the forum I am going to pursue a 32 to 35c tire with a higher psi rating. As for the 8 vs 9 speed debate that comes down to what price point we want to meet. Both are readily available and offer similar technology so its pretty much a wash. Disc brakes are a part of that bike that I feel will be advantageous over standard rim brakes. The wheel set will be available if you want to upgrade your current setup. The link you posted is a nice example for a utility bike but is in a different niche market. I enjoyed your post up until the end when you made a bit of a stab at me, the designer of the bike and an avid cyclist. Nonetheless I appreciate your honesty in my request of the forums opinions.

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