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  1. #1
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    I'm a heavy guy, what is the best set-up for me?

    Hey guys,

    now, I'm sure this question has been asked a million times or so, but I'd like to ask myself to get a more descriptive and precise response from you all.

    Anyways, I used to bike all the time as a kid and in my early teens; easily over 50K a day, and broke my bike when I was about 13. Stopped biking around then because I couldn't afford to fix my bike, and my family wasn't willing to help. Anyways, now I'm 17, and have a food amount of money to put into the sport again. I'm now 285 and 6'3. I'm a big guy, but I know there are much larger people who bike, so I know there must be a way to do it! Thing is, I'm not sure if those people are riding mountain bikes, or if they're riding road bikes. I'd prefer a road bike, but if it's not feasible, then a mountain bike will suffice.

    I'm really serious about getting back into this, as I've noticed it's the only thing I did as a kid which I really enjoyed. I would like to eventually start racing, but that comes later once I whip myself into shape! So, I'm really wondering what is the best set-up for me at my current weight?

    Any help is highly appreciated; thanks folks!

  2. #2
    A square going nowhere psalm's Avatar
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    I bought my road bike, a CAAD8, at 6' 295. Don't limit yourself just because of your weight.
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  3. #3
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psalm View Post
    I bought my road bike, a CAAD8, at 6' 295. Don't limit yourself just because of your weight.

    Awesome! Did you have to upgrade the tires and spoke count? I'm afraid I'll have to get custom made wheels or something that will run me a few hundred. If that's the case, then so be it, I'd just like to know what you did! Cheers mate!

  4. #4
    A square going nowhere psalm's Avatar
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    Changed tires only because I ran over a nail and put a nice sized hole in my sidewall. No change on the wheels, came with 32 spokes, upgraded my saddle and dropped my bars a couple of spacers. Otherwise she is all stock.
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  5. #5
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psalm View Post
    Changed tires only because I ran over a nail and put a nice sized hole in my sidewall. No change on the wheels, came with 32 spokes, upgraded my saddle and dropped my bars a couple of spacers. Otherwise she is all stock.
    Wow that's great to hear! If you don't mind me asking, what's your weight now? Has it changed? If so, how long did it take before you noticed a difference? I'm going to shop around and maybe I can find the CAAD8 for sale somewhere. Would you recommend the CAAD8 or something else?

    Cheers again; off to watch the Tour!

  6. #6
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    The safe recommendation is to stick with 32-spoke wheels. I'm 6'3", 265lbs. I ride two wheels: a Velocity Aerohead, 32-spoke rim with a PowerTap hub (built by Psimet, a guy here on BikeForums) for my everyday wheel, and a 28-spoke, 88mm carbon tubular rim with Novatec hub for my special events/races wheel.

    Other than that, most any modern bike frame will be just fine. Even carbon fiber (ask me how I know). The CAAD 8 is a good bike, too.

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  7. #7
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    The safe recommendation is to stick with 32-spoke wheels. I'm 6'3", 265lbs. I ride two wheels: a Velocity Aerohead, 32-spoke rim with a PowerTap hub (built by Psimet, a guy here on BikeForums) for my everyday wheel, and a 28-spoke, 88mm carbon tubular rim with Novatec hub for my special events/races wheel.

    Other than that, most any modern bike frame will be just fine. Even carbon fiber (ask me how I know). The CAAD 8 is a good bike, too.

    Thanks for the reply!

    Just wondering if it is necessary to have a rim built by someone? I mean, I'm not too knowledgeable about this, but can't I just purchase a 32-36 spoke wheel, slap on some good tires and start riding? I'm not doing any hard riding, just on fully paved roads. I'm thinking Cannondale is a good choice; problem is finding a used one with a 60 sized frame, or around there. I would need a 60 sized frame at 6'3, right? Or could I go for a 58 or something around there?

    I'm also looking at a new Trek 2.1 Compact bike, is that a good choice? I could get that bike very easily, as there is a dealer located down the road for me, but would it hold my weight if I got some 32-36 spoke wheels?

    Cheers guys, really appreciate the help
    Last edited by Silas XIV; 07-08-11 at 12:05 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    Thanks for the reply!

    Just wondering if it is necessary to have a rim built by someone? I mean, I'm not too knowledgeable about this, but can't I just purchase a 32-36 spoke wheel, slap on some good tires and start riding? I'm not doing any hard riding, just on fully paved roads. I'm thinking Cannondale is a good choice; problem is finding a used one with a 60 sized frame, or around there. I would need a 60 sized frame at 6'3, right? Or could I go for a 58 or something around there?

    Cheers guys, really appreciate the help
    The most reliable, durable & best wheel would be one that's built just for you. You could get lucky with slapping on any old 32/36 spoke wheel, but why waste the money? I have purchased several wheels from Performance bicycle because the price was good ($140-150 on sale). Mavic Open Pros, Ultegra hubs, 32-spoke. The wheels eventually go out of true, and eventually get cracks in the rims. Having some wheels hand made for me by a good wheelsmith who took into account my riding needs and my size? Those wheels are lasting very well.

    Also, even paved roads have potholes, cracks in the seam, rough spots, and other obstacles. At our weight, the effects on the wheels are magnified.

    I'm also 6'3" and I ride a 60cm frame. Chances are good that it would also fit you. But not guaranteed.

    The best way for all this is to go through your local bike shop (LBS). Be up front with them: tell them you're looking for a used bike on Craig's list (or whatever) and you would like to purchase a bike fit session (will cost some $$), in advance if possible. They would give you all the pertinent numbers to look for in a bike so that you fit the bike well. This would mean you'd be more comfortable, and you would stick with riding longer because it would be more enjoyable. Then, take the bike to them for any & all repairs. Treat them well with some loyalty, and over time, they'll do the same for you.

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  9. #9
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    The most reliable, durable & best wheel would be one that's built just for you. You could get lucky with slapping on any old 32/36 spoke wheel, but why waste the money? I have purchased several wheels from Performance bicycle because the price was good ($140-150 on sale). Mavic Open Pros, Ultegra hubs, 32-spoke. The wheels eventually go out of true, and eventually get cracks in the rims. Having some wheels hand made for me by a good wheelsmith who took into account my riding needs and my size? Those wheels are lasting very well.

    Also, even paved roads have potholes, cracks in the seam, rough spots, and other obstacles. At our weight, the effects on the wheels are magnified.

    I'm also 6'3" and I ride a 60cm frame. Chances are good that it would also fit you. But not guaranteed.

    The best way for all this is to go through your local bike shop (LBS). Be up front with them: tell them you're looking for a used bike on Craig's list (or whatever) and you would like to purchase a bike fit session (will cost some $$), in advance if possible. They would give you all the pertinent numbers to look for in a bike so that you fit the bike well. This would mean you'd be more comfortable, and you would stick with riding longer because it would be more enjoyable. Then, take the bike to them for any & all repairs. Treat them well with some loyalty, and over time, they'll do the same for you.
    Thanks for all the advice Adam!

    I'll definitely get down to my LBS sometime soon, and try out some different sizes! How much do you think it should cost me to get my wheels done? Will I have to get both wheels done, or could I get away with just the rear wheel, and then buy a really good 32 spoke front wheel?

    Final question, can I get wheels built at my LBS, or do I have to do some research to find someone who can do it?

    Cheers Adam

  10. #10
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    Thanks for all the advice Adam!

    I'll definitely get down to my LBS sometime soon, and try out some different sizes! How much do you think it should cost me to get my wheels done? Will I have to get both wheels done, or could I get away with just the rear wheel, and then buy a really good 32 spoke front wheel?

    Final question, can I get wheels built at my LBS, or do I have to do some research to find someone who can do it?

    Cheers Adam
    Not sure what you mean by "get wheels done". Do you mean to have them rebuild your current wheels? Or do you mean to buy a new wheel?

    You should be able to get away with just buying a good front wheel off the shelf. I use an old Mavic Ksyrium Elite with 18-spokes and have had no issues (although the hub sucks-quite noisy). Front wheels have better balanced tension than rear.

    You should be able to get wheels built at the LBS. However, ask some other riders from clubs (not just some schmoe on a bike) who in your area builds excellent wheels. Ask about the local "master wheel builder". Get your wheels built by him/her, not just some apprentice. If you can wait 2-3 months, I highly recommend Psimet from here on BF's. (He's hard to get ahold of, but worth it.)

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  11. #11
    A square going nowhere psalm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    Wow that's great to hear! If you don't mind me asking, what's your weight now? Has it changed? If so, how long did it take before you noticed a difference? I'm going to shop around and maybe I can find the CAAD8 for sale somewhere. Would you recommend the CAAD8 or something else?

    Cheers again; off to watch the Tour!
    Currently, as of this morning, I weigh 238 pounds. So far I've lost almost 60 pounds. It takes about a month or two to start noticing any real difference. Just remember one thing, ride for fitness, eat a healthy diet for weight loss. Bike riding alone won't "make" you lose weight. It takes a change in your lifestyle. I love my CAAD8, and I got her at a great price. But you will learn that the best bike out there, is the one that fits you best. I test rode plenty of bikes, from different manufacturers, and the Cannondale is the one that felt best. Test ride as many bikes as you can, as for size, that depends on how your built. I'm tall with short legs. A bike for a well proportioned 6' man would not fit me. So I had to get a slightly smaller size. My CAAD is a 54, kind of small for a 6 footer, but I have about a 31 inch inseam, my bike fits me fine.

    You're over thinking this, just get to your local bike shop, find a cool salesman, talk to them. Tell them your concerns, your plans, and they should give you at least a nice starting point.
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  12. #12
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psalm View Post
    Currently, as of this morning, I weigh 238 pounds. So far I've lost almost 60 pounds. It takes about a month or two to start noticing any real difference. Just remember one thing, ride for fitness, eat a healthy diet for weight loss. Bike riding alone won't "make" you lose weight. It takes a change in your lifestyle. I love my CAAD8, and I got her at a great price. But you will learn that the best bike out there, is the one that fits you best. I test rode plenty of bikes, from different manufacturers, and the Cannondale is the one that felt best. Test ride as many bikes as you can, as for size, that depends on how your built. I'm tall with short legs. A bike for a well proportioned 6' man would not fit me. So I had to get a slightly smaller size. My CAAD is a 54, kind of small for a 6 footer, but I have about a 31 inch inseam, my bike fits me fine.

    You're over thinking this, just get to your local bike shop, find a cool salesman, talk to them. Tell them your concerns, your plans, and they should give you at least a nice starting point.
    I don't feel like I'm over thinking this, because I think it's really good to know what bike is best suited for you before going to your LBS and talking to a salesman who is trying to meet his quota. I know not every salesman is like that, but I'd like to be prepared for it just in case that situation arises.

    I believe my inseam is 32, but I'm not sure. When I buy jeans, they are normally 40-42 inch waist by 32, which I'm assuming is my inseam; right?

    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    Not sure what you mean by "get wheels done". Do you mean to have them rebuild your current wheels? Or do you mean to buy a new wheel?

    You should be able to get away with just buying a good front wheel off the shelf. I use an old Mavic Ksyrium Elite with 18-spokes and have had no issues (although the hub sucks-quite noisy). Front wheels have better balanced tension than rear.

    You should be able to get wheels built at the LBS. However, ask some other riders from clubs (not just some schmoe on a bike) who in your area builds excellent wheels. Ask about the local "master wheel builder". Get your wheels built by him/her, not just some apprentice. If you can wait 2-3 months, I highly recommend Psimet from here on BF's. (He's hard to get ahold of, but worth it.)
    What I meant by getting wheels done was just getting ones built from scratch. Which do you think is best? Handing them over a wheel and asking them to rebuild it, or asking them to build one from scratch?

    I know this is probably a stupid question, but whenever I even sit on my girlfriends mountain bike, the tires go flat. I'm sure that's normal, because aren't mtb tires inflated lower than road bike tires? Just wondering if I get on a road bike, if the tires will go flat at say 110PSI?

    What about a touring bike, over a road bike? I know they're practically the same, but I'm going to assume that a touring bike has a better frame than a road bike for someone my weight? I'm looking to get this bike as a fitness bike. I want to get to 220ish, then I'll purchase a high-end bike.

    Just looking for as much help as possible before going to the store. I've been screwed into buying things before, so I guess I'm just trying to cover my own arse.

    Cheers

  13. #13
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    I believe my inseam is 32, but I'm not sure. When I buy jeans, they are normally 40-42 inch waist by 32, which I'm assuming is my inseam; right?
    Your pants inseam will not be the same as a "true" inseam used for bike measurements.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    What I meant by getting wheels done was just getting ones built from scratch. Which do you think is best? Handing them over a wheel and asking them to rebuild it, or asking them to build one from scratch?
    Having them rebuild wheels will be financially cheaper. But, I think the better wheels would be brand new, from scratch. This way, the components (rim, spokes, etc), spoke diameter and lacing pattern, and any extras (i.e.: nipple or spoke washers) can be geared specifically to you and your conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    I know this is probably a stupid question, but whenever I even sit on my girlfriends mountain bike, the tires go flat. I'm sure that's normal, because aren't mtb tires inflated lower than road bike tires? Just wondering if I get on a road bike, if the tires will go flat at say 110PSI?
    Apples & oranges. 110psi should be fine for you on a 25 wide tire. I ride a 23 tire, but pump it up to about 125psi. That's actually more than the tire's max (it's 116psi), but I like 'em a little harder and haven't had any problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    What about a touring bike, over a road bike? I know they're practically the same, but I'm going to assume that a touring bike has a better frame than a road bike for someone my weight? I'm looking to get this bike as a fitness bike. I want to get to 220ish, then I'll purchase a high-end bike.
    Either frame will not be an issue at your weight, whether "road" or "touring". (BTW, a touring bike is also a road bike. You might be referring to a "race" vs "touring" bike.) If you're after fitness, either will do.

    Here's a summary of the differences between the two: a touring bike has slightly shallower angles, causing it to handle a bit differently. It's more like a great big Lincoln Continental, long, swooping turns, floats over small bumps, etc... It also has much easier gearing in anticipation of you carrying some heavy loaded racks and carrying them up hills. Traditional touring bikes are getting more rare at bike shops but can certainly be found (or ordered in).

    A racing bike has more aggressive geometry. They're like a quick, nimble little sports car. It'll respond to your commands quickly & decisively. It sometimes feels like a harsher ride , especially compared to a touring bike, but over time, you can get used to it (unless you have physical issues). I myself have ridden my "racing" bike on rides over 130 miles without issue. It's light-weight as it's not intended to carry heavy rack loads, and will feel as if it's jumping with your pedal strokes. The gearing usually isn't as easy as a touring bike, but with "compact" cranksets and a big 28-tooth rear cog, they can come close.

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  14. #14
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    Your pants inseam will not be the same as a "true" inseam used for bike measurements.


    Having them rebuild wheels will be financially cheaper. But, I think the better wheels would be brand new, from scratch. This way, the components (rim, spokes, etc), spoke diameter and lacing pattern, and any extras (i.e.: nipple or spoke washers) can be geared specifically to you and your conditions.


    Apples & oranges. 110psi should be fine for you on a 25 wide tire. I ride a 23 tire, but pump it up to about 125psi. That's actually more than the tire's max (it's 116psi), but I like 'em a little harder and haven't had any problems.


    Either frame will not be an issue at your weight, whether "road" or "touring". (BTW, a touring bike is also a road bike. You might be referring to a "race" vs "touring" bike.) If you're after fitness, either will do.

    Here's a summary of the differences between the two: a touring bike has slightly shallower angles, causing it to handle a bit differently. It's more like a great big Lincoln Continental, long, swooping turns, floats over small bumps, etc... It also has much easier gearing in anticipation of you carrying some heavy loaded racks and carrying them up hills. Traditional touring bikes are getting more rare at bike shops but can certainly be found (or ordered in).

    A racing bike has more aggressive geometry. They're like a quick, nimble little sports car. It'll respond to your commands quickly & decisively. It sometimes feels like a harsher ride , especially compared to a touring bike, but over time, you can get used to it (unless you have physical issues). I myself have ridden my "racing" bike on rides over 130 miles without issue. It's light-weight as it's not intended to carry heavy rack loads, and will feel as if it's jumping with your pedal strokes. The gearing usually isn't as easy as a touring bike, but with "compact" cranksets and a big 28-tooth rear cog, they can come close.
    Cheers Adam, I really appreciate the time you, and others, have taken to reply!

    I've been doing constant research for the past few days, and am thinking a Cannondale would be a great choice! I'm looking into the CAAD 8 105 or the CAAD 8 7 Sora. The Sora is cheaper, and sadly, it seems more appealing for that very reason. Then again, if I can save up some more money , I might not be able to resist the CAAD 8 105. Are the differences really worth the price difference? I mean, so long as the frame holds my weight, I should be fine. I plan on getting the wheels redone anyway, so the ones they come with don't really matter.

    Anyways, so far I'm looking at the CAAD 8 with some re-built 36 spoke rims, and maybe some continental tires, or something of the sort. What do you think? Anything else needed? I'm guessing I should probably upgrade pedals as well..And probably a seat! Looking to spend under $2,000 for it all!


    Thanks guys

  15. #15
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    There's a bit of a jump in the quality of components going from Sora to 105. But they both work fine. As a beginner, Sora should be good. Later, when you become a Road Nazi, you'll want to upgrade to 105 or Ultegra, but you can do that piece-meal. I'd only recommend staying away from a triple chainring as that has a learning curve. If you have hills in your area, try to get a compact chainring. (The LBS will know.)

    To start, you'll also need the following:
    • Helmet
    • Cycling shorts (bibs are better IMHO, but more expensive)
    • Floor pump
    • Flat changing kit: frame pump or CO2 system, spare inner tube or 2 or 3, tire levers. Ask somebody at the shop to show you how to use these to change a flat tire.
    • You'll want a seat bag to carry the flat-changing kit in. Anything else you carry you can put in your jersey pockets, if you get a jersey (not overly a "need" when starting, but nice to have.
    • A cell phone & some way to carry it with you whenever you ride.
    • RoadID. I use the dog-tags and never take it off - just easier.
    • You might not strictly need it, but I'd recommend a bike computer with a cadence function (try to keep your feet spinning close to 90rpms or more - better for the knees)
    .

    Anybody else have something to add?

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    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    There's a bit of a jump in the quality of components going from Sora to 105. But they both work fine. As a beginner, Sora should be good. Later, when you become a Road Nazi, you'll want to upgrade to 105 or Ultegra, but you can do that piece-meal. I'd only recommend staying away from a triple chainring as that has a learning curve. If you have hills in your area, try to get a compact chainring. (The LBS will know.)

    To start, you'll also need the following:
    • Helmet
    • Cycling shorts (bibs are better IMHO, but more expensive)
    • Floor pump
    • Flat changing kit: frame pump or CO2 system, spare inner tube or 2 or 3, tire levers. Ask somebody at the shop to show you how to use these to change a flat tire.
    • You'll want a seat bag to carry the flat-changing kit in. Anything else you carry you can put in your jersey pockets, if you get a jersey (not overly a "need" when starting, but nice to have.
    • A cell phone & some way to carry it with you whenever you ride.
    • RoadID. I use the dog-tags and never take it off - just easier.
    • You might not strictly need it, but I'd recommend a bike computer with a cadence function (try to keep your feet spinning close to 90rpms or more - better for the knees)
    .

    Anybody else have something to add?
    Cheers Adam! How much do you think that'll run me? Just a ballpark estimate would be great, thanks!

  17. #17
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    My advice is to ride as many bikes as you can and worry about components, specs, or whatever else later. Don't go into this thinking you're going to find the perfect bike. Rather, go into this thinking you are going to find a bike you enjoy riding.

    Get something that fits, and you enjoy. By riding a lot of bikes you get an idea of what feels best and what you find the funnest. Get a bike that is about 80% of what you currently do or will do and keep in mind that the other 20% is for what you might do.

    What that means is that you will use the bike for getting in shape or commuting most basic road bikes would work fine. Again, test ride as many as you can. Worry about components, wheels, or whatever else if they break.

    Race oriented bikes tend to put you in a more aggressive riding position. However, if you are trying to get in shape and plan on spending an hour or so in the saddle then something less aggressive would probably be more comfortable.
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  18. #18
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
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    Great starter gear list. For additional thoughts:

    The first bike you buy prolly won't be your last, especially intending to lose weight and potentially race. Don't need to go high end components and Sora is not bad, it gets bad press compared to the race stuff, but so what.

    I'm 6'3" and ride 58's usually. You can make a short bike feel bigger but you can't make a tall bike smaller. At my height, 58's get a nice seat to bar drop. If bending is an issue, you may want to start with a relaxed geometry bike (or touring as you referenced earlier) as their bars tend to match seat height.

    All sub-$1500 bikes come with crappy wheels. Its where OEMs save cash. You won't get crap trading them in, so ride them til they break then get your high spoke count wheels. Granted, my heaviest was 230 so it may be more pressing for you, but I only broke spokes on Alex s500 budget wheels when I did something really stupid.

    If you get an aluminum bike, try to get a carbon fork. All the comments you see about the discomfort of aluminum bikes typically comes from aluminum fork.

    If you buy a better seat, which is the most common first upgrade, realize that seats come in different widths and the right width seat is more important than padding. Padded shorts trump padded seats every time.

  19. #19
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollCNY View Post
    Great starter gear list. For additional thoughts:

    The first bike you buy prolly won't be your last, especially intending to lose weight and potentially race. Don't need to go high end components and Sora is not bad, it gets bad press compared to the race stuff, but so what.

    I'm 6'3" and ride 58's usually. You can make a short bike feel bigger but you can't make a tall bike smaller. At my height, 58's get a nice seat to bar drop. If bending is an issue, you may want to start with a relaxed geometry bike (or touring as you referenced earlier) as their bars tend to match seat height.

    All sub-$1500 bikes come with crappy wheels. Its where OEMs save cash. You won't get crap trading them in, so ride them til they break then get your high spoke count wheels. Granted, my heaviest was 230 so it may be more pressing for you, but I only broke spokes on Alex s500 budget wheels when I did something really stupid.

    If you get an aluminum bike, try to get a carbon fork. All the comments you see about the discomfort of aluminum bikes typically comes from aluminum fork.

    If you buy a better seat, which is the most common first upgrade, realize that seats come in different widths and the right width seat is more important than padding. Padded shorts trump padded seats every time.
    I think I'll probably go with a 58CM, but I'll go to my LBS and get sized for one! I'll also invest in a good seat and I'll probably ride my wheels until they fail, which should be pretty soon, I think! I believe they come with 36 spoke wheels already, but it could be 32! Either way, I'll find out when I go to my LBS

    I'm currently looking at the Cannondale Synapse 7 Sora over the CAAD sora, because it has the carbon forks, which I don't believe the CAAD sora does. They both seem to be in the same price range, however! Any other differences in the two that you can notice? I compared specs and they seem almost identical!

    My dream bike is a Cervelo S5! Hopefully one day I can afford one of those babies!

    Quote Originally Posted by exile View Post
    My advice is to ride as many bikes as you can and worry about components, specs, or whatever else later. Don't go into this thinking you're going to find the perfect bike. Rather, go into this thinking you are going to find a bike you enjoy riding.

    Get something that fits, and you enjoy. By riding a lot of bikes you get an idea of what feels best and what you find the funnest. Get a bike that is about 80% of what you currently do or will do and keep in mind that the other 20% is for what you might do.

    What that means is that you will use the bike for getting in shape or commuting most basic road bikes would work fine. Again, test ride as many as you can. Worry about components, wheels, or whatever else if they break.

    Race oriented bikes tend to put you in a more aggressive riding position. However, if you are trying to get in shape and plan on spending an hour or so in the saddle then something less aggressive would probably be more comfortable.
    Thanks for the advice exile; I think it'll be a mixture of road and maybe some light (and I mean light) trail riding...I want to do it both for exercise, and for fun, and would love to make a living out of it in some form or another; whether it be through a bike shop, or as a pro. I guess the first step is to turn off the computer and go buy a bike!

  20. #20
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silas XIV View Post
    Cheers Adam! How much do you think that'll run me? Just a ballpark estimate would be great, thanks!
    It's hard to come up with pricing because there is such a wide variation for each item. Also, for some things, you do get what you pay for (not all things, though). Here's a range from least to most...

    • Helmet: $50--200
    • Cycling shorts: $60--300 (bibs are ~$20 more)
    • Floor pump: $40-60
    • Flat changing kit: $50
    • Seat bag: $15--25
    • A cell phone: -- ? --
    • RoadID: $16--30
    • Bike computer: $30--300

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  21. #21
    Junior Member Silas XIV's Avatar
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    Thanks Adam, going to give my LBS a call in a few minutes and hopefully figure something out! Cheers guys! If anyone wants to add anything, feel free, as I won't be buying for quite a while still!

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