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  1. #1
    Retired C.O. RandoneeRider's Avatar
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    When to drink, when to rest, when to stop?

    I tend to pour myself into a new hobby, oft'times with more fervor than necessary. So help to figure out the things I don't know yet but NEED to know:

    1) I've only recently realized that my heart rate moniter can be a tool to use rather than something to refer to later.
    -- What are the various methods for which I can use this tool?
    (having just posted moments ago with regard to elevated bpm on a hot ride)

    2) I wanna ride, but I don't want to be considered a pansy for slowing or resting needlessly. By nature, I believe I'm lazy.... but not UNTIL the task at hand is completed. So I've crested to that side of life considered 'older', I am seriously overweight, I'm new to this bicycle thing, and I haven't done any serious exercise in 25 years (save to work my way through two Correctional Officer training academys spaced 20 years apart). Even though I feel strong, and only my butt and hands feel taxed, I can ride over 20 miles and not feel taxed.
    -- What is the wisdom regarding how often and when a newbie rider sl/ash 'old guy', should slow down or simply give it a rest when out on those rides over twenty miles?

    3) Hydration.... it's a good thang!
    -- Let's assume it's a hot day, no shade, newbie -fat- rider, when/how much/how often should I be taking a sip of that water bottle? Right not, I may not bother unless/until I've ridden ten miles, pulling over and drawing as much as half my water bottle..... finishing the rest of it when I'm done with my ride.
    Last edited by RandoneeRider; 07-10-11 at 10:11 AM.

  2. #2
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    One "old guy" to another.......
    Start slow, learn as much as you can about cycling, and most importantly......LISTEN TO YOUR BODY!!
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    One "old guy" to another.......
    Start slow, learn as much as you can about cycling, and most importantly......LISTEN TO YOUR BODY!!
    Bingo!

    Cycling, like any exercise regimen and/or diet, is good for you... BUT will only be as effective as your long-term dedication to its application. The biggest single reason that diets/exercise programs fail is that the 'newbie' bites off more than they can digest, too early in the program, and the motivation wanes.

    You'll likely enjoy better long-term results if you establish modest goals in the beginning, stick to a simple plan/schedule, and then add to it. Remember that fitness is increased by following a work/recover/work/recover cycle, NOT by burning yourself out or getting over-use injuries. This is especially true for us older, heavier folks.

    Hydration, like nutrition, is best accomplished by small, frequent doses. Don't overload your digestive system with too much food or electrolytes, but made sure that you're drinking plenty of water and that your urine output is sufficient (the color is a good key) and monitor your perspiration. If you have been sweating and then notice that you've stopped... STOP.

    Best of success in your new 'obsession'!
    B. Gross
    SoCal

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  4. #4
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    For us older guys (I'm 54) consistancy is the key. I suggest only pushing yourself (distance wise) 1 time a week max. The experts say to to go slow for at least 500 miles. No interval training ect... You're making changes to your body on a cellular level. That takes more than ignoring pain. It takes time and happens slower with us than younger people. I asked a 56 year old guy that's racing how long it takes to get fast. He replied 5 years minimum.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    RR, Good advice above.
    1) Have a doctor run a stress test to determine what you need to look for with your HRM, and what to watch out for.
    2) For now stop and rest when you feel it necessary. Don't stop for too long, however as it can be difficult to get going again.
    3) You should be able to pee about once an hour. Another way it was expressed to me is that one needs to urinate more often than when not riding to insure enough fluids are taken in.

    Brad

  6. #6
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    One tip re: hydration (and this is only my experience! YMMV!)
    Whenever I see someone else drinking, I use that as a reminder to myself to also take a drink.

    When it's hot (only you can decide for yourself what that is), I make sure that I'm stopping at stores and whatnot to get ice. Cold water is much better on hot days than non-cold. (Of course, non-cold water is better than no water.) It helps cool your interior. Living in hot SoCal, I always make sure that I have CamelBack's or Polar's insulated bottles.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  7. #7
    Getting older and slower!
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    Drink a little at least every 15 minutes.

    If when you stop to rest, your heart rate doesn't quickly come down to "normal" you are likely dehydrated and may be headed towards heat stroke. Cool off and back off.

  8. #8
    Retired C.O. RandoneeRider's Avatar
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    Well.... I posted this earlier, then set out on my longest ride yet.

    95*, 27 miles, 2 hours 15 minutes to include two stops of sipping & cooling, avg bpm 120 (musta been the stopping that brought the average down), max bpm 138, avg of about 13.1 mph.....

    I pressed & pressed on, on a mission, didn't wanna stop, finally pulled over 16 miles into the ride. Drank a third of my water (cooled AND flavored by the juice from some fruit with my oatmeal before setting out), momentarily wrapped one of those neck coolers around my neck, and was back on the road in less than ten minutes.
    - Six miles later, more water, decided to wear the neck cooler for the rest of the ride.
    - Finished my ride, felt good, glad to be off that saddle, finished my water.

    What I learned from this ride:
    * I waited too long to set out on my ride, fueled by simple Irish Oatmeal & berries (about 2+ hours).
    * I should buy a second water bottle to put within reach while riding, and sip from it. My insulated bottle is on blue ice in the pack on my luggage rack.
    * If I'm gonna strive to ride a longer distance than I'm accustom, maybe it's a better idea to do that on a day other than the same afternoon of a three mile morning walk at a brisk pace......

    And about this 'eating enough (quality) calories' based on my Resting Metabolic Rate,
    JEEZus! I've been logging my calories, counting grams of protien, eating every 3 hours, drinking 120 ounces of water daily, and I'm supposed to eat at least 2200 calories and up to 3000 on an exercise day such as today..... and after four meals, I'm only up to 1500 calories!?!!

  9. #9
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Stop when tired, drink when thirsty.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  10. #10
    Senior Member JohnA42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    Stop when tired, drink when thirsty.
    Agree with the first part, but disagree with the second. Drink before you're thirsty. Drink something before you start, then every 15-20 minutes. More often if it's hot or humid, or if you just sweat a lot.

  11. #11
    Senior Member diverkiwi's Avatar
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    This is what I'm having to learn right now, took myself to heat exhaustion last week, but did a ride yesterday (w/ a camelbak) and it was much easier on me even though it was hotter yesterday.
    The other trick I am doing is pouring water on my head when I stop. It helps me cool down.

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