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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-11-11, 06:47 AM   #1
llmercll
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Longer rides giving me urinary problems

Hey everyone, I've recently started slightly longer rides. I've actually only done two so far, and the first one was 7 miles. The next morning I noticed I had to pee really bad as I often do, but had a weak stream and trouble starting. It seemed to resolve itself and I've been ok, until today when I did a 9 mile ride. I'm having the same issue again!

During my ride the saddle KILLS me. I need to take a break every 15 minutes and keep standing up and adjusting myself. I weigh 388 and I know that isn't helping, but I've been eating the pain and getting it done.

I can't keep damaging myself like this though, any ideas? Has anyone else had these issues?

Also, I'm wondering if anyone has any experience using a bike bib to help reduce chaffing while jogging. I need to take a break from the cycle for awhile =p

thanks!
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Old 07-11-11, 07:03 AM   #2
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llmercll, You need to either readjust (drop the nose) on your current saddle or look for a replacement. Shorts with too much padding can also cause this problem.

Brad
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Old 07-11-11, 07:06 AM   #3
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Post a pic of your bike showing the saddle.
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Old 07-11-11, 08:20 AM   #4
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Post a pic of your bike showing the saddle.
X2

I had a similar problem, never had trouble urinating but man the pain on that area was horrible. I ended up getting a seat with a cut out down the center, and added some nice riding shorts with chamois pad it helps. The shorts are a little expensive, but they are amazing on long rides. I still get minor pain and numbness starting about mile 10, but standing up for a few seconds relieves the pressure. I also found that my seat was too narrow, I'm a big guy 6' 2" at 300lbs, so when I bought my new bike I found the Body Geometry Riva Road, 155mm width from Specialized helped a bunch. This seat gets me more on my sit bones than any other saddle I have tried to date. Hope this helps, keep us updated.
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Old 07-11-11, 08:39 AM   #5
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Agree with the previous posts. Sounds like you've got some severe soft tissue compression going on when you're riding. Could be a number of things:
- saddle tilted nose up too far
- bars too low/far causing you to lean forward too much
- overpadded shorts or saddle
- too narrow saddle (sitting all on soft tissue, not sit bones)

You definitely need to get it sorted, because that sort of tissue/nerve compression is also what ends up leading to E.D.
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Old 07-13-11, 12:33 PM   #6
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Sorry for the late reply. I've taken a few pics of my current saddle.

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/825/dscn2958q.jpg/
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/35/dscn2959u.jpg/

And here's the seat that came with my bike

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/810/dscn2888v.jpg/

I'm also wearing falconi bib shorts. I thought the ARS saddle would be good because of the slit in the middle, but I'm questioning whether or not it's wide enough for my sit bones. I'm 6"5 so probably have wider sit bones than most people right?

thanks!
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Old 07-13-11, 12:39 PM   #7
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I'd tilt that nose down just a little. You don't want to have to fight to keep from sliding forward on your seat, but even the slightest uptick in the angle on that seat could be causing you issues.
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Old 07-13-11, 05:59 PM   #8
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At your weight your saddle is wrong, wrong, wrong !!! Strongly suggest that you find and install a "noseless" seat to keep blood flowing or you WILL cause permanent damage to yourself.
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Old 07-13-11, 06:34 PM   #9
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At your weight your saddle is wrong, wrong, wrong !!! Strongly suggest that you find and install a "noseless" seat to keep blood flowing or you WILL cause permanent damage to yourself.
How do you know this? I question noseless saddles, unless the bike is designed where you are riding really upright or the crank is forward. Otherwise I would worry about control. But opinions vary on the issue. However, it does seem that a number of the 400plus pound people here rode bikes with standard saddles.

llmercll, I'd try a slight tilt down. If that doesn't work I'd measure your sit bone distance and get an appropriate seat if the one you have is too narrow. After seeing many tips on how to measure the bones the one that worked best for me was to lightly dampen a towel, lay the towel out flat on a hard flat chair. Put a piece of paper on top of the towel. Sit and lean forward. Rock back and forth a bit. With luck you will see the indentations of the sit bones as the paper will be wet where your bones press on the paper into the towel. Don't assume that the distance is large just because you are tall.

Last edited by goldfinch; 07-13-11 at 06:37 PM.
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Old 07-14-11, 03:29 AM   #10
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Ilmercil:

I feel your pain! I was severely out of shape for quite some time a number of years ago when I broke my ankle in a severe cycling accident in Japan. I kept eating and putting on weight, without riding and burning massive calories. But as I began riding longer and further, each day, I lost quite a bit of fat in the groin and apron areas. No E.D. No permanent damage. In fact, more stamina and performance when it counts! And nowadays, any ride up to 50 miles and I have no question. Over that, and I need to prep for snacks. And pain is non-existent. I have a tough backside today. Just count calories. Remember, to just maintain your weight you burn 30 cals/kg of body mass. If you eat less than that and bike, you will lose weight. Eat more than that... well. The opposite happens.
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Old 07-14-11, 05:14 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
llmercll, You need to either readjust (drop the nose) on your current saddle or look for a replacement. Shorts with too much padding can also cause this problem.

Brad
I disagree about dropping the nose. In my experience all this does is encourage one to slide forward and put one's weight on the narrow part of the saddle, which is worse for the soft tissue. If anything I'd suggest the opposite. I'd also suggest switching to a harder saddle. It is, however, impossible to give definitive advice because different solutions work for different people.
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Old 07-14-11, 01:27 PM   #12
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http://sporting-goodsonline.com/imag...bike-seat-.jpg

Try something like this? I ordered one this last week and it's not here yet. Can't wait to try it.

This particular model is made by Leppers in the Netherlands. They can be found for as little as 10 euros used up to 80 euros new.
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Old 07-14-11, 08:13 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
Agree with the previous posts. Sounds like you've got some severe soft tissue compression going on when you're riding. Could be a number of things:
- saddle tilted nose up too far
- bars too low/far causing you to lean forward too much
- overpadded shorts or saddle
- too narrow saddle (sitting all on soft tissue, not sit bones)

You definitely need to get it sorted, because that sort of tissue/nerve compression is also what ends up leading to E.D.
This is a good list. I would also add that the fore/aft position of the saddle is important. If the saddle is too far from the handlebars, the OP may be sitting on the narrow portion of the saddle. In my experience, this is generally uncomfortable. Sometimes, pushing the saddle forward a bit so that you're sitting on the wider part is all that's needed...
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Old 07-15-11, 10:00 AM   #14
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Thanks for all the replies!

Strangely enough I feel more comfortable on the saddle when I'm sitting more forward, toward the nose. I actually sat there quite comfortably for awhile. What does that mean?

thanks!
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Old 07-15-11, 12:17 PM   #15
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Lots of good suggestions so far for solutions to your pain. I'm no doctor but the link between saddle discomfort and problems urinating seems iffy. I'd be more inclined to think it's a result of mild dehydration from the harder workout of riding further. Try drinking more water throughout the day.

Hope you get your saddle set up comfy!
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Old 07-15-11, 12:28 PM   #16
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Thanks for all the replies!

Strangely enough I feel more comfortable on the saddle when I'm sitting more forward, toward the nose. I actually sat there quite comfortably for awhile. What does that mean?

thanks!
My friends call that symptom "biker's spread." It's quite normal. And you feel it the more you ride. Some folks call it "chafing" and others call it "San Quentin" for what happens to guys in prison. (Uuhhggg!) But what I found was that narrower, longer saddles really helped as I rode more. But people all have different pubic bones. It's an adventure finding the right saddle. That might be an appropriate quest that might be fun to try out as you progress. BTW, my wife buys long boxer briefs which don't have the crotch seams like regular triangular briefs. And these days, 20 miles without chammie and life is fine and no urinary symptoms. But mind you, if you do have a family history of large prostate, you may want to get it checked out. My father has it. Nothing cancerous, but he starting have symptoms at age 45. And it did affect his bike riding until some surgery to reduce the size and also drugs to keep growth in check. So I get a bit more paranoid and my doc stays on top of the issue.
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Old 07-15-11, 12:29 PM   #17
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use an SMP saddle
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Old 07-16-11, 09:24 AM   #18
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I will try to lower the nose a tiny bit and move the saddle forward. I also need to measure my sitbones =p

I have another saddle to try as well. If adjustments + my other saddle don't help, I may need to purchase a new one. I hope my LBS will allow me to "try" one out if that's the case.

thanks!
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Old 07-18-11, 07:56 AM   #19
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Dropping the saddle nose will cause additional problems as weight will be transferred to the shoulders, neck, triceps, wrists, etc. Sounds like you want to make a difference in your lifestyle and that's great. I suggest that you look for a bike fitter (maybe BikeFit fitter) and let them adjust you properly. Don't buy anything or do anything as a proper fit will do wonders. As the weight comes off positions may have to be modified and the fitter will take you all the way. Look up: http://www.bikefit.com
Get fitted and it will be the best thing you would have done for yourself.
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