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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-15-11, 07:28 AM   #1
rjrankin83
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New to riding need TIRE HELP!

I'm new to riding, and got into it to start doing tri sprints/olympics. Been riding this month a lot and have had trouble with tubes. For starters I'm 6'4" 245lbs riding a cannondale r600. My tires are 700x23c. This month alone I've popped 7 tubes. The pops have been a variety of glass and i dont know what. Also only 2 were my front (both glass) and the other 5 were my back tire. This last tube I decided to change my back tire (it was looking pretty rough but again I'm new so what do I know)

Basically I'm trying to get the thoughts of fellow big guys on the tires they ride. My new Michelin lithion tires only have 30 miles on them and my first tri is tomorrow morning so not much I can do now but cross my fingers that my problem was my bad tire
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Old 07-15-11, 09:42 AM   #2
mkadam68
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Make sure:
  • Anything that poked through your tire to cause a flat has been removed from the tire
  • All spoke holes are completely covered by the rim strip
  • Analyze the holes when you get a flat. Snake-bite means a pinch flat. Where was the hole? Rim side (spoke hole/pinch flat) or tire side (debris caused)? Inspect the area of the tire right around where the hole is to find the debris in the tire that caused the flat. Remove the debris.
  • Don't ride "in the gutter" or too much on the shoulder of the road. That's where the debris is. If you can handle it, ride 2-3" to the left of the white line.

Rear will flat more just 'cause more weight is on it.
I'm 6'3", 260lbs. I ride Michelin Pro3Race, 700x23's, pumped to about 124psi. I don't have an unusual amount of flats, no.
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Old 07-15-11, 01:15 PM   #3
sillygolem
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A "snake bite" is when you have two adjacent holes in your tube. This is caused by pinching, generally when you smack into something hard and the tube is squeezed against the rim. A light layer of baby powder will help the tube slide around the tire and the rim, which will help cut down on these flats. Tire pressure is also critical for preventing snake bites.

Tires take a very long time to wear out - As long as it's round and holds air, it's good. Tread does basically nothing on street tires.

Slimed tubes are a double-edged sword: The sealant will let you fix holes by adding some more air to the tube, but it's hard to find what punctured it in the first place. "Thorn proof" tubes are just thicker. This may also be an option.

Tire liners will keep sharp things from reaching your tube. If you do change tires, look for some with kevlar belts.
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Old 07-15-11, 02:54 PM   #4
rjrankin83
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Originally Posted by sillygolem View Post
A "snake bite" is when you have two adjacent holes in your tube. This is caused by pinching, generally when you smack into something hard and the tube is squeezed against the rim. A light layer of baby powder will help the tube slide around the tire and the rim, which will help cut down on these flats. Tire pressure is also critical for preventing snake bites.

Tires take a very long time to wear out - As long as it's round and holds air, it's good. Tread does basically nothing on street tires.

Slimed tubes are a double-edged sword: The sealant will let you fix holes by adding some more air to the tube, but it's hard to find what punctured it in the first place. "Thorn proof" tubes are just thicker. This may also be an option.

Tire liners will keep sharp things from reaching your tube. If you do change tires, look for some with kevlar belts.
So I should put baby powder around my tire before I ride?
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Old 07-15-11, 03:16 PM   #5
mkadam68
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No. On your inner tube before you put it into the tire. I use flour instead-it's cheaper.
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Old 07-15-11, 05:23 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
Make sure:
  • Anything that poked through your tire to cause a flat has been removed from the tire
  • All spoke holes are completely covered by the rim strip
  • Analyze the holes when you get a flat. Snake-bite means a pinch flat. Where was the hole? Rim side (spoke hole/pinch flat) or tire side (debris caused)? Inspect the area of the tire right around where the hole is to find the debris in the tire that caused the flat. Remove the debris.
  • Don't ride "in the gutter" or too much on the shoulder of the road. That's where the debris is. If you can handle it, ride 2-3" to the left of the white line.

Rear will flat more just 'cause more weight is on it.
I'm 6'3", 260lbs. I ride Michelin Pro3Race, 700x23's, pumped to about 124psi. I don't have an unusual amount of flats, no.
124 psi is a bit much. I run them just about the max at 116 psi. 6'1" 205 lbs
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Old 07-15-11, 05:30 PM   #7
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6'2", 240 and I use 23 cm michelin pro race at 120 psi... (at least that's what the meter reads when I disconnect the hose, it probably drops a bit). No flats in over a year until two weeks ago when I landed in a rut trying to avoid my daughter.

As a bunch of other people said (I"ll repeat because it's important) look for the cause of the flat! YOu can pop your tires from underinflating too.

I think most people will line up their tire label by the valve stem to assist in looking for debris inside the tire. Run your fingers along the inside (careful if you have glass in there).

Also, you may wish to consider using new tubes each time - they aren't that expensive. Forget the cheap glueless patches except as an emergency measure. I carry spare new tubes in my seat pack and I'll patch them at home and reuse them, but I never feel like doing that while I'm riding.

Good luck with your tri
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Old 07-15-11, 07:27 PM   #8
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To me, that many flats in that short a time frame indicates at least one of two possible issues - riding where there's a lot of crud on the road, and/or not checking inside the tire for what caused the previous flat, finding and removing it before changing tubes. The latter is absolutely essential, or you'll get flat after flat after flat in pretty short order.
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Old 07-16-11, 09:50 AM   #9
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Thanks for the advice guys! The rim was clean last check and I've always replaced with a new tube no patches. My new tire got me through the 16 mile portion of my tri this morning but I think I'm still going to go up to a 25c in the rear for reassurance.

The roads where I live are garbage and some flats I guess are just unavoidable. It is nice we have bike lanes but that's where all the debris sits. Guess I've learned to just stay out of them for the most part
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Old 07-16-11, 10:13 AM   #10
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Wipe a piece of kleenex around the inside of the tire. If anything is poking through the casing, the kleenex will shred on it.
Line the tire label up with the valve stem, way easier to match the hole in the tube to the tire to find the problem.
After installing a new tube, inflate the tire to 50-60#s and then deflate it. Pinch the tire away from the rim on both sides and verify the tube is not pinched between the tire and rim "hook."
I used to run Spinskins tire liners, and now run Bontrager Hardcase tires with a kevlar belt. Yeah, they are little heavier. I rarely have flats and then it is usually from large debris. (a screw and a piece of metal that sliced the tire)
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Old 07-16-11, 12:49 PM   #11
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The size of your tire will do nothing , as far as flats goes.

Find the cause of you getting so many to begin with.

I'm 6'4 and 270 or so, I rarely get flats!

Drat... now I jinkxed myself!!!!
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Old 07-17-11, 10:16 PM   #12
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I hate to add a comment to this thread cause I will probably get 3 flats this week, but I use to ride Armadillos when I was at my heaviest weight, and have also used Bontrager Hardcase and Continental Gatorskins, all good tires and resistant to flats. Well, that's my 2 cents and I think I will good put an extra tube in bag for my ride tomorrow. Any time I had as many flats as you have experienced it has always been something still in my tire that I missed or spoke issues. Alos, my LBS told me there has been a run of bad tubes lately. Right around the stem area is where they leak.
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Old 07-18-11, 03:31 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by turkey9186 View Post
After installing a new tube, inflate the tire to 50-60#s and then deflate it. Pinch the tire away from the rim on both sides and verify the tube is not pinched between the tire and rim "hook."
THIS. I stopped having flats once I started doing this. When I first got on a bike again at 230 lbs, I had 3 flats in a month and was getting them changed at bike shops around Groningen because I didn't know how to do it myself very well. I watched a bunch of youtube vids and got the sacred clue phone, started deflating and re-inflating and checking for proper seating. Now it's very very rare for me to get a flat.
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Old 07-18-11, 03:59 AM   #14
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Rona: That's a good idea!
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Old 07-18-11, 06:24 AM   #15
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My two cents is to give a +1 support to better tires. The tires mentioned are good and so is the Schwalbe Marathon. Properly inflating them to avoid a tube being pinched/twisted is important but once a tube is properly inflated in a set of Schwalbe Marathon's or Gatorskins or Armadillo's you'll find very few flats will follow if you keep the tire properly inflated. Don't forget to check -carefully- for embedded particles after each ride because crap that might flat another tire may embed in one of these tires and eventually work through unless you manually dig it out before that happens.
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