Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Would these wheels work for a 250 lbs Clyde?

    I am currently planning to replace my Alex rims that came stock on my Cannondale. I have been told that hand built wheels can be a good value. I saw this set on eBay and would like to know two things. One, would this Wheel set be appropriate for my weight (250 lbs) and two, at this price, is this a good value? Thank you for any help.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...#ht_500wt_1413

  2. #2
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    5,165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Stick with new 36 or 40 spoke count wheels to hold over 200 lbs safely.

    Spoke count is critical for those of us that weigh more than average.
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  3. #3
    Senior Member volosong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Antelope Valley, SoCal
    Posts
    2,306
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Stick with new 36 or 40 spoke count wheels to hold over 200 lbs safely.

    Spoke count is critical for those of us that weigh more than average.
    You may be right. I just know that I purchased a set of Dura-Ace wheels off ebay with a 16 front/20 rear spoke count that I've been riding since the early Spring and into the Summer. No problems at all. They seem to hold my weight just fine. Then again, I've been hovering between 205 and 210 during this time. I suspect how long wheels hold up is more a function of how we ride than the spoke count. I know that I try to avoid potholes, unevenness in the pavement, (such as rail road tracks), and debris scattered here and about. Still, I ride pretty intensely, just not roughly. The wheelset on my other bike, Vuelta XRP Team Super Light, are also holding up quite well. Both the Dura-Ace and Vuelta sets are still straight and true as the day I snapped them into the forks.
    Deut 6:5

    ---

    "Ha ha! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders - The most famous of which is 'never get involved in a land war in Asia'".
    - Vizzini during his "battle of wits" with the Man in Black

  4. #4
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Upland, CA
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Liege, Motorola Team Issue Eddy Mercxk, Surly Crosscheck Cyclocross bike, Fisher Supercaliber Mtn. Bike
    Posts
    5,001
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Jens

    The new style open pro rims are just plain poor in terms of longevity.. They all seem to develop cracks on the eyelets, I have spoken to a couple local builders and they have seen this happen more often than it should.. There are lots of other great wheels for us 200+ guys..

    If you want custom you can look at DT Swiss rims or Velocity rims (fusion and deep v) for a nice custom build.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Paul01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, Fl
    My Bikes
    Vitus 979, KHS Montana Comp
    Posts
    531
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe think abut as more bullet proof rim like the Mavic A-319? http://www.mavic.com/en/product/rims...lon/rims/A-319

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Ultimate 2006, Litespeed Pisgah , Specialized Roubaix 2008, Trek Madone 2011
    Posts
    886
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had my LBS build me a set of Velocity A-23 rims (32 spoke) on DT hubs. I'm 260 lbs and have used them for 2 years with no problems. The 23 mm width is perfect for running a 25 mm tire.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks everyone for your advice. I like the Dura Ace hubs but sounds like (thanks SoCalRider) the Open Pro Rims may not be the way to go. I have heard and read great things about the Velocity Deep V rims and most likely will go in that direction.

  8. #8
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Upland, CA
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Liege, Motorola Team Issue Eddy Mercxk, Surly Crosscheck Cyclocross bike, Fisher Supercaliber Mtn. Bike
    Posts
    5,001
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you go 36 hole the fusions are a nice rim too, they are right at the same weight as open pro.. The deep v's are about 100 grams more in weight..

  9. #9
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix, Merlin Road, Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    6,973
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a pair of Easton EA90SL or so(not the super skimpy ones) with 24/28 spoke count and they're right as rain for me.

    I think the key is to get well built wheels in the first place and then maintain them.

    I'm 235, the wheels aren't. But they're still true.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    4,855
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    I have a pair of Easton EA90SL or so(not the super skimpy ones) with 24/28 spoke count and they're right as rain for me.

    I think the key is to get well built wheels in the first place and then maintain them.
    Agree with both statements. I also have a set of Easton EA90SL wheels and love them. I'm also surprised at how many people buy wheels, perform no maintenance, and then seem flabbergasted when they end up with wheel problems...

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Stick with new 36 or 40 spoke count wheels to hold over 200 lbs safely.

    Spoke count is critical for those of us that weigh more than average.
    No true. While 36 or 40 spoke wheels may indeed be bulletproof, they are certainly not required.

    I have close to 8000 miles on a set of 24/20 Mavics and haven't had the first problem out of them. My weight has fluctuated from 230 to 270 (I'm not proud of that) and back several times in that time. Not a single issue.

    I also have another set of Mavics that are 20/20. They have close to 2500 miles on them and have only needed truing once.

    I also have a set of Neuvation M-28's on my race bike that has been put through more than a set of wheels should ever be put through. The only thing that has ever happened was a broken hub flange. I contacted Neuvation and they said it was defective and replaced it no questions asked.

    However, I did take each set of wheels to a local wheelbuilder and have him go over them for me before I rode them. I believe that made all the difference in the world.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,854
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    This will:

    http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=fulcrum+racing+7

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Stick with new 36 or 40 spoke count wheels to hold over 200 lbs safely.

    Spoke count is critical for those of us that weigh more than average.
    That really isn't true. Rules of thumb can be helpful when you need to make a quick decision in a pinch, but you need to take them with big grains of salt.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  13. #13
    Senior Member squirtdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
    My Bikes
    '89 Miyata 1400, '82 nishiski (current utilty/commuter project)
    Posts
    3,099
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    for what it worth.... I'm at 270....maxed out at 285...slowly coming down. I have only run 32 spoke wheels with very little problem:

    On my road bike i have Velocity deep v on ultegra hubs with SS double butted spokes (forget brand). I built these my self, but had my fav LBS do the final truing.

    on my utility commuter I am running Sun CR18 rims and Deore hubs. I got the wheels via ebay.....and broke a spoke on the rear pretty quickly, soon broke another so I rebuilt that wheel with new spokes (again ss double butted) that was the first wheel i built and have not had a spoke break since.... I did have to do a little retruing after about 1500 miles

    so I don't think 36/40 is an absolute need
    '82 Nishiski commuter/utility
    '83 Torpado Super Strada ... cafe commuter
    '89 Miyata 1400
    Soma rush Fixie
    '78 Univega gran turismo (son's Fixie/SS)
    06 Haro x3 (son's bmx)
    Electra cruiser (wife's bike)

    looking for: De Rosa 58cm ELOS frame and fork internal cable routing

  14. #14
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    5,165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ok fellas' why is it that many of you agree that 36>40 spoke wheels are better and stronger still you discount the need for heavier riders simply because you've gotten away with lesser spoke count wheels.

    That doesn't mean I"m wrong in what I said it only means those of you that run low spoke count are damn lucky and nothing more.

    "The strength of a wheel comes mostly from the spokes, and secondly from the rim. To have a strong, durable wheel, the quality of the wheelbuilding is far more important than the quality of the parts."

    " Low spoke count wheels are trendy nowadays. (NOTE: just trendy not best)But let's face it: spokes really don't weigh all that much, and they are really what gives the wheel its strength. So you really gain very little by using few spokes. Consider, for example, Rolf wheels. They have very few spokes, but the rims have to be heavier in order to provide structure for the wheel in the large gap between spokes.

    Still, if you're very light and ride only on the road you'll be putting less stress on your wheels than if you're heavy or ride off-road, so you can get away with fewer spokes. As a general guide: for road riding, 32 spokes make a good durable wheel, while if you're large, ride off-road, or go touring, 36 spokes is better. "

    http://www.myra-simon.com/bike/wheels.html
    Last edited by Nightshade; 07-22-11 at 04:56 PM.
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  15. #15
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,854
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    ... it only means those of you that run low spoke count are damn lucky and nothing more.
    ... and it's only the grace of god that keeps almost every plan from crashing. Extreme luck, and nothing more.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Wiki
    Special pleading is a form of spurious argumentation where a position in a dispute introduces favorable details or excludes unfavorable details by alleging a need to apply additional considerations without proper criticism of these considerations themselves. Essentially, this involves someone attempting to cite something as an exemption to a generally accepted rule, principle, etc. without justifying the exemption.
    Quality of spokes - including their tension and so on - is as important as quantity.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  16. #16
    Member Primetime75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    My Bikes
    Felt F65 / Raliegh M80
    Posts
    45
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have been using Mavic A719 rims, DT swiss spokes and Ultegra hubs with 32 count front and rear. Haven't had them trued once. I have been using these wheels for about 4 years. I am a big rider.
    Super Clyde (but dropping fast)

    Felt Z35 - Full Carbon
    Ultegra Hubs
    32H front & rear Mavic 719 Rims

  17. #17
    Senior Member jr59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    2,139
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some how Nightshades seems to come up with some STRANGE ideas!
    ie... clipless pedals, but not to thread driff.

    Where does it say 40? Or is it your idea that more must be better.

    A good set of 32 spoke hand built wheels with quality rims and double butted spokes,
    Ridden on the street, mostly smooth roads, should be fine. If you really wanted to be on the safe side, go to 36 on a Dyad rim.
    Buy then you have to run a 28 tire.

    But then I just said what you posted, not what you wrote.

    To the OP, Look up peter white, or call joe young. Peter is an opinioned old man, that knows his stuff, but is hard to deal with.
    Joe Young is a GREAT wheel builder, who is also a very nice guy.
    Or look around for a local wheel builder, ask the REAL fast racers in your area. Most times they will give you a clue.

    good luck
    Gravity hates us all, but it hates me more than thin people!

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Ok fellas' why is it that many of you agree that 36>40 spoke wheels are better and stronger still you discount the need for heavier riders simply because you've gotten away with lesser spoke count wheels.

    That doesn't mean I"m wrong in what I said it only means those of you that run low spoke count are damn lucky and nothing more.

    "The strength of a wheel comes mostly from the spokes, and secondly from the rim. To have a strong, durable wheel, the quality of the wheelbuilding is far more important than the quality of the parts."

    " Low spoke count wheels are trendy nowadays. (NOTE: just trendy not best)But let's face it: spokes really don't weigh all that much, and they are really what gives the wheel its strength. So you really gain very little by using few spokes. Consider, for example, Rolf wheels. They have very few spokes, but the rims have to be heavier in order to provide structure for the wheel in the large gap between spokes.

    Still, if you're very light and ride only on the road you'll be putting less stress on your wheels than if you're heavy or ride off-road, so you can get away with fewer spokes. As a general guide: for road riding, 32 spokes make a good durable wheel, while if you're large, ride off-road, or go touring, 36 spokes is better. "

    http://www.myra-simon.com/bike/wheels.html
    I must be doubly lucky. I've survived both 24 spoke wheels and clipless pedals for probably 5 years now. I also ride a carbon frame (not steel - gasp!). I'm going for the luck trifecta!

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    I must be doubly lucky. I've survived both 24 spoke wheels and clipless pedals for probably 5 years now. I also ride a carbon frame (not steel - gasp!). I'm going for the luck trifecta!
    Hopefully you're not wearing spandex, because that would make four.




    My weight has fluctuated between 225 and 265 over the last couple of years, and I have a 20f/28r wheelset with over 3k miles that only recently gave me problems with the rear wheel staying true- after my wife backed over it with our 4k pound SUV. The rim was replaced with a DT RR585 due to a crease in the side of the rim, and I expect to get at least another 3k miles out of the rear wheel before my wife runs over it again.

    A well-built 32 spoke 3 cross wheel is more than adequate for most folks on the road weighing 250 lbs., but of course, YMMV.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    34
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm 300 and run on Campi Shamal's with out problems.
    Mint 75 Paramount Track Bike
    72 26" Chrome Paramount
    72 Chrome Paramount
    72 Raleigh Comp.
    79 Raleigh Comp GP
    76 Trek TX700
    Braxton touring bike
    86 Raleigh Peak
    2010 Stump Jumper Comp
    2010 Stump Expert FSR 29er
    2008 S-Works Roubaix full Campi SR 11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •