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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-07-11, 07:00 PM   #1
chefisaac
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hand pump or co2?

What's your preference?

I know the cost of co2 is more expensive then air.

What do you use and why?
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Old 08-07-11, 07:05 PM   #2
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Bought three of these on sale for $9.95
Pump my tires up to 100# psi.


http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...00_20000_50004

I have seen CO2's fail about 12 times.
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Old 08-07-11, 07:32 PM   #3
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I carry a couple of co2 canisters. I don't like the look of a frame pump.
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Old 08-07-11, 07:46 PM   #4
ed strodtman
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I use a Crank Brothers Power Pump, one of the smallest mini-pumps on the market. I can usually get one of my 700X35s up to a rideable pressure in around five minutes of admittedly hard pumping. The pump has two settings, high volume and high pressure. The pump fits right in my seat bag and is very light. You have to follow the instructions to make it work. There is a very good instructional video on the Crank Brothers website.
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Old 08-07-11, 07:57 PM   #5
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I carry an inflater, a couple of carterages, and a cell phone. In all my years of riding, I've never called due to a flat. I have had two flats, but never three--yet.

I've never ruined a tube with CO2, but I have messed up a tube trying to use a frame pump.
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Old 08-07-11, 08:10 PM   #6
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In the dark ages, My frame pump would fall of the bike when I was riding over rough ground. The few times I needed it on the road the damm thig didn't work. The internal working parts would dry out.

Recently been toting a CO2 inflator - Very small, a couple of canisters, and an extra tube + patch kit. In five years, used the inflater once on the road/trail. I like the inflaters that use a screw-on canister. The flow of CO2 can be stopped if needed.

Now if I could find NOx canisters I could make the bike really move.
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Old 08-07-11, 08:17 PM   #7
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I carry a Lezyne Alloy in my seat bag. It uses CO2 and is a pump.
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Old 08-07-11, 08:32 PM   #8
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I carry a small frame pump, they don't run out, or accidentally jet out instead of into the tire. Good for small leaks, etc. I have three different ones, the one I am using now is a Zefal mini that clamps on with your bottle cage. Came with a little strap to hold it securely in place. Pervious to that I was using a HPx2 that worked great for years till my son forgot to pick it up and ran it over with his bike. The other was one of the "have to have" pumps mentioned in an article one year, the SO picked it up and it has never been worth a darn for staying on the bike. Works great, but falls out of it's mount all the time.
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Old 08-07-11, 08:33 PM   #9
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Frame pump, since I don't know how many flats
I'll get on any particular ride. Plus it's nice to help
out a fellow rider knowing I'm not giving up my
ability of getting to my destination in case I get a
flat.
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Old 08-07-11, 09:51 PM   #10
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I got a pump, I'd rather know I'm not going to run out of air.
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Old 08-07-11, 11:03 PM   #11
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I'll give you two guesses! I also never run out of air.

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Old 08-08-11, 04:07 AM   #12
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You have to know how to fix a puncture to use CO2, and I'm not talking about patching. But rather finding the reason for the puncture in the first place. THAT takes practice, discipline and skill. And there have been a few people out there who have failed miserably on that score, based on my own observation and the posts on these forums.

Then there is the risk that you will get the tube caught between the rim and tyre bead. Inflate with a CO2, and whammo! At least with a pump you have control over the process. Seen it done a cou0ple of times

I've never used a CO2 inflator. I would rather rely on a pump. I've used a few over time, with a long period using Zefal HPX pumps, but the best for me has been the small Giyo pump that I can use to inflate a 700x23C tyre in two minutes. It fits discreetly on my frame.

One of the issues new riders run into is the pressure required to pump up a narrow-profile tyre. The reason why they find it difficult is likely they are using a pump with too wide a bore. The Giyo I mention has a narrow bore, which makes pumping a whole lot easier without that much of a drop-off in volume.

And look at it this way. If you're in the C&A forum, regard using a pump as additional calorie burn, rather than taking the lazy... errr... low-burn way out.
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Old 08-08-11, 05:15 AM   #13
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I've had pumps break, but never had a problem with an inflator. I think it best to carry both on a tour,I carry co2 when I ride locally.

Marc
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Old 08-08-11, 05:37 AM   #14
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Decent pumps don't break much, I haven't had one fail in years. CO2 costs, is more prone to failure (usually, to be fair, through user error) and how many canisters are you going to carry? Just another triumph of the marketing men over the gullible consumer, IMO.
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Old 08-08-11, 05:39 AM   #15
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Decent pumps don't break much, I haven't had one fail in years. CO2 costs, is more prone to failure (usually, to be fair, through user error) and how many canisters are you going to carry? Just another triumph of the marketing men over the gullible consumer, IMO.
More to the point, how many are you going to throw away?
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Old 08-08-11, 05:56 AM   #16
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Both! I carry 1 x Cartridge, 1 x Crank Bros Power pump. I use the cartridge if the weather is cold or raining - or to quickly top up a healing tubeless tyre. Most of my MTBs are tubeless - so I buy Cartridges in packs of 30.
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Old 08-08-11, 07:55 AM   #17
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I carry both, and choose which one to use based on the circumstance.

Cool day, leisurely ride with no place to get to? I use the frame pump.

Scorching hot day? Raining? Need to get to work on time? I use the CO2 inflator.

Since I use large 26x2.0 tires, I use the frame pump to fill the tire until it's got about 10-20 psi... basically 50 pumps or so until it starts getting tough. Then I pop on the CO2 inflator and that takes it the rest of the way to 70-80 psi almost instantly. Saves about 5 minutes of really tough pumping. Downside: each cartridge costs a few bucks, so when I use it, I make sure it's worth it. I carry 2 cartridges with me.
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Old 08-08-11, 07:57 AM   #18
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More to the point, how many are you going to throw away?
I've only used one so far. Haven't tossed it yet; looking into recycling options.
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Old 08-08-11, 09:22 AM   #19
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I carry the always popular Topeak Road Morph w/Gauge. It will easily inflate a road tire to 100psi in about 100 strokes. Having had three flats in one day I like the fact that the Road Morph never runs out of air, unlike CO2 cartridges. Combine the Road Morph with a patch kit, some sort of tire boot, and a pair of Pedro's Tire Levers and you're ready for almost any tire-related emergency...
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Old 08-08-11, 10:18 AM   #20
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I used to carry CO2 cause that was the cool thing until several times the CO2 didn't work and I was left up sh*t creek without a paddle! So now I carry a small efficient pump (Topeak road or mountain Morph is the best!) and leave nothing to chance. I can't tell you how many times I had to stop and "rescue" some roadie who tried the CO2 but was now out of options. Out came the trusty Topeak pump and roadie rescued! My firends all carry other pumps. If they get a flat, they always grab mine instead. Can't go wrong with the Topeak.
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Old 08-08-11, 10:21 AM   #21
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and how many canisters are you going to carry?
Two. I've never needed more than one on a ride, and even then it's pretty rare.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:00 AM   #22
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I carry a pump. I've had a ride a while back where I flatted 3 times during the first half. You never know what you'll run into.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:16 AM   #23
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Both on roiad rides. Carry two CO2s and a tiny little pump for backup. Use "them" (never had to use more than one on a ride) first. Recyle the cartridge when I get home.

When touring, I carry a Road Morph G so I can easily inflate every day.

BTW...For those who don't know, CO2 leaks faster than air. If you use it, delfate the tire completely after your ride and then refill with air. Don't make the mistake of leaving it in and then thinking you have a flat a few days later.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:17 AM   #24
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There is a bit of a learning curve with CO2 cartridges, especially with the cheapo, simple nozzle. I have no problem with the cheapo, simple nozzle, but if I had to figure it out for myself I would have problems. The procedure I use is:

1. Remove wheel from bike, remove tire, check for where the leak is and remove any penetrating object.

2. With a Presta valve tube, loosen the little nut, depress the plunger, and inflate the tube a bit by blowing it with your mouth up like a balloon, then put the tube and tire on the wheel.

3. Screw the nozzle on the CO2 cartridge until it is tight. When you do this, no gas will come out of the nozzle; the little point that punctures the seal is plugging the opening.

4. With a Schrader valve tube, put the nozzle on the valve and unscrew the cartridge a little bit from the nozzle. This will allow a little of the CO2 into the tube to make it easier to put it on the wheel. When it's slightly inflated, tighten the cartridge again to stop the flow. (This is very quick; think of it as just "burping" it- unscrew it a little, then screw it back in right way.) Think of it as turning a faucet on and off.

5. Once the tube and tire are reassembled onto the wheel, put the wheel on the bike. (I do this before doing the full inflation because sometimes the wheels come off more easily when the tire is flat; when they are inflated the tire may have problems clearing brakes, fenders, etc.)

6. Attach the nozzle to the valve on the tube, and unscrew the cartridge a little from the nozzle, then screw it back in again. Inflate the tire until it is seated on the rim, but not much more than that.

7. Ensure your tire is properly seated against the rim. If it looks like it isn't, massage the tire into place. If necessary, deflate the tube just a little to make the tire easier to manipulate.

8. Inflate the tire a little at a time, unscrewing and rescrewing the cartridge on the nozzle. I use several blasts in instead of letting it fill all at once for a few reasons. First, when the gas expands, it cools and if you're holding onto the cartridge you can freeze your fingers and/or the tube valve. Second, if you let it go all at once, you might blow the tire right off the wheel with too much pressure, the tube will explode and then you're really messed up. Just kind of burp it a little at a time until the pressure in the repaired tire feels about the same as the pressure in the tire that didn't have a flat. (I squeeze the tire on the sidewalls with my fingers to gage it.)

Sounds complicated, but takes far less time to inflate a tire than with a mini pump.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:18 AM   #25
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I also never run out of air.
Yes but one day you will climb yourself so high that there will no longer be any atmosphere. What will you do then Mr Smartypants, eh? EH?!

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