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Thread: Cadence

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    Member Tex Bs's Avatar
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    Cadence

    I just got a bike computer that measures cadence. At 6'1" and 265 I am interested in what a good cadence should be.

    I started riding regularly in April and I ride about 15 miles a day with an average speed of 13-15 mph. I live outside of Houston, and my rides are on fairly flat terrain.

    What is your average cadence?

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    Senior Member RollCNY's Avatar
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    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...e-for-a-newbie

    First time I've tried dropping a link, but this a thread with info out the wazoo on cadence
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

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    Senior Member Paul01's Avatar
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    In short, 80-100 is good.

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    80+ it will feel weird but it is soooo much better for your legs... Essentially sub 80-Damaging, above 100=in efficient (unless you are GOOD... Pros can sustain 120!)
    http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a=207be&r=3&c=5&u=M&g=p&f=abcdefghij&z=a.png

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Staying on top of the gear, spinning rather than mashing can take place
    at lower cadences.
    and lower speeds, just match the gear ratio to the terrain.
    and stay ahead of the gear..

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    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    My sweet spot seems to be around 95 RPMs right now so I try to keep between 90 and 100 during most of my rides.

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    I'm usually in the 80-90 range, but I really try to keep it over 70 when climbing. Especially with a load, or when I'm tired. Below 70, experience has shown my knees will start to ache very soon.

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    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    Like CACycling, I pretty naturally fall into a cadence of about 95 or 96 on flats.
    Craig in Indy

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    If you are only riding 15 miles at a time, you don't need to worry about your cadence. Worry about seat time and getting your legs and lungs into shape. Work on your cadence once you get some longer rides under your belt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    If you are only riding 15 miles at a time, you don't need to worry about your cadence. Worry about seat time and getting your legs and lungs into shape. Work on your cadence once you get some longer rides under your belt.
    exactly! Group rides help you build cadence without thinking about it, might want to join a local group ride now and then.

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    Since you just now started riding, try to maintain 80 cadence to build endurance. Once your legs/lungs start to catch up, you can increase cadence to work on your aerobic capacity (and for a more efficient ride), or 65-75 cadence to work on muscle endurance (need to be careful when doing this as it can damage your knees). I kind of keep at 90ish myself on flats.

  12. #12
    Retired C.O. RandoneeRider's Avatar
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    My opinion, based on what I've read and personal (albeit limited) experience:

    If a rider is cruising his bike at anything less than 55 rpm, the only benefit he's getting is fresh air and better blood circulation than if he was sitting on the front porch.

    Bumping the cadence up to 65 now tells your body that it's exercising, and once again, that's better than sitting on the front porch. But 65+ WILL result in a little lactic acid the following day leading you to believe that you're doing something good for the body.... but it might be limited to cardio alone.

    Over 70rpm, your heart and lungs are in it for the party..... but this is just warming you up for the day when a more rapid cadence results in evem BETTER results.

    80 and over: Interesting that I read somewhere (here) that a gentleman was told an rpm of 80 is easiest on knees and less likely to result in taxing knees already weakened from age or prior abuse.

    I'm discovering with every additional ride of late, that spinning at 83+rpm results in faster overall average speeds, my right knee no longer bothers me ('cause I'm not "mashing"), and though my heart rate/"bpm" is higher and in a better zone to benefit from the exercise.... I'm peddaling at a consistent/(easier?) rate, right out of my home's drive-way, up hills, on the straights, and when conditions allow me to speed....., throughout the entire ride all the way back home. Recently I've noticed too that my time for a 10 mile loop has been reduced by five or more minutes since increasing my cadence to 83 or above.
    Last edited by RandoneeRider; 08-09-11 at 02:54 PM.

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    Member Tex Bs's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great answers. When I first got back on a bike, after a 25 year gap of a very sedentary lifestyle, I got trapped into the mashing form of riding. I felt that the harder I worked my muscles, the stronger and better rider I would become.

    Since I joined this forum, I have corrected my style of riding and began riding in a lower gear but with a focus on spinning. That only got me so far, as I was having a hard time knowing what cadence I was riding at. So I went out and purchased a Sigma 1606L and rode with it for the first time today.

    I have started a spreadsheet to track my rides:
    Today: 20.04 miles in 1:12:44 for an average speed of 16.53 mph.
    My average cadence was 84.

    Heading down in SE Texas what we consider a 'hill' I reached a top speed of 26.94 mph feeling great and like superman - at which someone casually road past me. OUCH

    I have a long way to go but:
    Starting weight in Oct 2010 - 320lbs and could only ride a mile.
    Current weight - 260lbs and road my longest distance ever, 31 miles on Sunday.

    I feel I have a bit more work on my endurance before joining a group ride.

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