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  1. #1
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    Totally new to this and clueless which bike.

    Hi all. I really want to get into bicycling for fitness and fun but and really stuck picking out a bike. Im 6' 300 lbs and really dont want to invest in a bike Ill break lol. Budget is around 600. I've been eyeing a Raliegh Venture 4.0 but really want a road bike. Any suggestions?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Two main suggestions for you when shop for a bike to carry your 300lbs.
    1.) you want a steel frame
    2.) you want wheels with no less than 36 spokes per wheel. (very important!)

    Other than that I'd say a Cruiser or a rigid mountain bike (NO shocks) is a real good place to start. A full on road bike won't be comfortable nor durable at your present weight.

    My favorite brand.........
    www.worksman.com
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  3. #3
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    avoid worksman

    Also, steel, aluminum, carbon, whatever ... you're not going to break the bike. All three materials feel different ... if you can, test them out and see what feels best to you.

    The wheels, yeah, you'll need a more robust wheel with a higher spoke count ...

    but don't be dissuaded or discouraged that your size relegates you to a "fat man's" bike ... it's simply not true.
    Last edited by ill.clyde; 08-19-11 at 12:27 PM.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies folks. I have checked out two local bike shops just to look around. The worksman look nice but I would really want to get it from a shop so I could have it professional fitted and such.

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=Nightshade;13104171]Two main suggestions for you when shop for a bike to carry your 300lbs.
    1.) you want a steel frame
    2.) you want wheels with no less than 36 spokes per wheel. (very important!)

    I will certainly keep the steel frame and spoke count in mind thanks.

  6. #6
    A square going nowhere psalm's Avatar
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    I got my CAAD8 at almost the same size as you 6 feet 295 pounds, for a little bit more then your budget. It's aluminum frame, carbon fork, with 32 spoke wheels. Carried me just fine. Don't let you weight and size limit you to what type of you bike you feel you might need.
    01:20:23:00
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  7. #7
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    I don't think you need to be constrained to steel for the frame material. I don't have any personal experience with carbon, so I can't offer an informed opinion about that, but aluminum will work fine. There's nothing wrong with steel - you just don't need to narrow your search to only steel frames if you find yourself drawn to something else.

    The type of bike is a personal matter and will depend on what you want to do with it, what kind of riding you intend to do, what you like or don't like in terms of fit and position, you name it. Ride as many kinds as interest you and see what appeals to you.
    Craig in Indy

  8. #8
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    I'd suggest a touring bike, like a Surly LHT or Trek 520, as they're built to carry large loads. Problem with that is it'll blow your budget, and it'll be hard to find this late in the year, unless you get lucky and find a close-out on a size that fits you.

    You might also look for a cyclocross bike.

    Either way, make sure you get the wheels checked carefully, by somebody who knows what they're doing. Most wheels in this price range will come undertensioned and not stress-relieved, meaning you'll start popping spokes quickly (I've done it in less than 500 miles).

  9. #9
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    A road bike will be fine. I am 335 pounds 6 foot 4 and ride a road bike. I love Giant brand bikes. Solid bikes.

    I dont know NJ well enough since I just moved to Cherry Hill but if you are somewhat close to where I live, you can ride my road bike a little and see if you like it. Just a thought.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    If you want a road bike, and you're doing this to gain fitness and lose weight, then you should get a road bike, because a bike you enjoy is one you'll ride. If it's gathering dust, it isn't helping you.

    You'll probably want to look into the used market in your area. Your budget will go much further this way. A lot of people get fancy bikes, don't use them, and wind up selling them down the line. It's a bit like how a car depreciates, but not as severe.

    You aren't going to break your frame unless you crash it, regardless of what it's made from. Heavy people have trouble with wheels, not frames. Make sure you get one with good wheels, and take them to a bike shop to be trued and retensioned. Depending on your ability, you might do well by learning to do wheel work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    1.) you want a steel frame
    2.) you want wheels with no less than 36 spokes per wheel. (very important!)
    Honestly, you can safely ignore both of these suggestions. This is pure superstition. The quality of the wheel is more important, but harder to measure, than things like how many spokes there are. With 20 and 24 spokes, I can bunny hop obstacles in the road and still have true, round wheels. I've even hit nasty potholes and gone over curbs I didn't see at night, and they're holding up without a hitch many thousands of miles later. My store is anything but unique.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  11. #11
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    Wow this is a great forum. Thanks so much for all the input. Glad to know a road bike isin't out of the question. When everyone is saying "quality of the wheels" what should I look for? I know to go double walled and the more spokes the better. Oh and thanks again really.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    I've done very well with Fulcrum Racing 7 wheels. And I've seen them on bonktown for not much more than $100 (for the set). The downside is that they're heavy, weighing in at about 1,860 grams, which is about twice as much as my frame!



    Personally, though, I'd get a road bike, and ride it with whatever wheels it comes with until they start to be a problem, before spending anything on a new set. Depending on how you ride and over what, that could be a few months, or a few years.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  13. #13
    Senior Member 1oddmanout's Avatar
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    2 suggestions: Felt Cafe 8; Giant Via 8
    Imagine a country where the schools have all the money they need and the Air Force has to conduct a bake sale to buy a bomber.

  14. #14
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    I am 6' 1" 280. Just bought a Trek 7.3 love it. Didn't want a road bike at my present size and the local LBS steered me away from the 7.5 due to spoke count. I love to ride the bike and to avg 13 mph is easy.
    BillMc

  15. #15
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    Jamis have some nice road bikes that might fit your budget. There are some reasonably priced road bikes in the GT line as well.
    If Rocky Mountain is sold in your area, they have really good wheels on them. Might be a little higher priced, though.

  16. #16
    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
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    Personally for somebody entering the sport I'd advise a cross type bike or mountain bike with 1.5" city tires. The reason I say this is there can be a very long process of getting the rear in gear. That is to say the simple process of getting used to sitting on a bike for the time it takes to get in good exercise can be a very difficult thing for many people. A LOT of people get put off by their sore but and larger tires can make a ride so much less painful to the butt. A cross bike with 1.5" tires can be every bit as fun as any bike but it's just more versatile than a road bike. I ride a road bike myself but drop bars themselves can be a challenge until somebody is in slightly better shape. That said, only the OP knows if riding a bit faster is a big incentive. That's what road bikes offer and it really can be a motivator. It is for me. I much prefer rolling at 17mph than 12. It's a huge deal to me so I get that but my advice is to consider if that's the goal at this point. A cross or mtn bike will be slower but will have lower, easier gearing too and that's a big deal. Best of luck.

  17. #17
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    Chuck007, Because you mentioned a hybrid earlier, I submit this: http://www.globebikes.com/us/en/glob...?pid=11HaulUS1 . This is a bit heavier duty than the Raleigh and Globe is associated with Specialized, a well respected bike manufacturer.

    Brad

  18. #18
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    Honestly, you can safely ignore both of these suggestions. This is pure superstition. The quality of the wheel is more important, but harder to measure, than things like how many spokes there are. With 20 and 24 spokes, I can bunny hop obstacles in the road and still have true, round wheels. I've even hit nasty potholes and gone over curbs I didn't see at night, and they're holding up without a hitch many thousands of miles later. My store is anything but unique.
    I respectfully disagree. 70 miles on a 32 spoke wheel and the damned thing fell apart. 3000 miles on a similar 36 spoke wheel and I've only just broken the first spoke last month. You will not catch me riding a 32 spoke wheel anytime in the near future.

  19. #19
    attacking the streets!
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    aluminum frames are fine, under any normal conditions you're not going to break one.

    the more spokes, the stronger the wheel.

    i'm a fan of giant bikes, i feel they sell a good bike at a reasonable price.

  20. #20
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    Hi all. All this info has helped a ton. In keeping with the brands my local store has I'm really reading up on the Trek Wingra. I believe everyone who said it will be a big learning curve and probably uncomfortable to jump right on a road bike and this seems like a better start. Anyone have thoughts on the Wingra or just agree?

  21. #21
    attacking the streets!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck007 View Post
    I believe everyone who said it will be a big learning curve and probably uncomfortable to jump right on a road bike and this seems like a better start.
    the biggest advantage to having a road bike is speed, the negatives are less comfort/harsher ride and they're not really meant for hard riding (like hitting potholes). you're looking for exercise and recreation, go with something more suited to that.

    does your shop carry gary fisher bikes?
    Last edited by jimnolimit; 08-20-11 at 06:04 PM.

  22. #22
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    @jimnolimit. Yes they carry Trek, Fuji, and a couple other less popular. No giant or specialized.

  23. #23
    I am the Snail~! Peter_C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Two main suggestions for you when shop for a bike to carry your 300lbs.
    1.) you want a steel frame
    2.) you want wheels with no less than 36 spokes per wheel. (very important!)

    Other than that I'd say a Cruiser or a rigid mountain bike (NO shocks) is a real good place to start. A full on road bike won't be comfortable nor durable at your present weight.

    My favorite brand.........
    www.worksman.com
    An aluminium frame is perfectly fine as well. A 'Giant' Cypress or the like. I started at 378lbs with a 2010 Giant Suede DX, wheels were changed under warranty, but no other issues - the front suspension didn't even bottom out. Something like that would leave you the funds to have a rear wheel built for you
    Peter_C
    http://s1103.photobucket.com/albums/g475/Peter_CC/ <-- My Photos

  24. #24
    attacking the streets!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck007 View Post
    @jimnolimit. Yes they carry Trek, Fuji, and a couple other less popular. No giant or specialized.
    ultimately, it will come down to what feels best when you ride it. trek's gary fisher line offers some good values (like the advance/advance disc).

  25. #25
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    I repeat myself ............
    "2.) you want wheels with no less than 36 spokes per wheel. (very important!)"

    Sure, there are those who get lucky and skate by on fewer than 36 spokes per wheel but you won't find the smart savvy clyde riding on such a Mickey Mouse weak wheel.

    Start with 36 spokes or more then loose weight to be able to ride the lighter 32 and fewer spoke wheels safely.

    Let's not forget that spokes come in different gages (size) with 12 & 14 gage (thin) most common on bicycles. Only the Worksman comes with 11 gage (motorcycle grade) spokes to build a super strong wheel.
    Last edited by Nightshade; 08-20-11 at 07:15 PM.
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

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