Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 93
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Easton EA90 SL Broken Spoke

    I had a spoke break on the front wheel of my Easton EA90 SL on Saturday. The wheel was true before the spoke broke; it was not a case of me riding around on a wheel that was grossly out-of-round. I live in PA where the roads are horrible, and I weigh 220 pounds. After just 1,000 on these wheels, I am now concerned as to their durability. I bought these over the SLX version because I thought these where the clyde-version: extra spokes for extra strength. But now I am having doubts.

    Took the wheel into my lousy LBS today. They do not have matching spoke and will be replacing the broken stainless steel spoke with a black anodized spoke.

    Now that I have lost my confidence in these wheels, I am thinking about selling them to buy something else. What wheels have you found to be durable for clydes?

    Or would you tell me I'm nuts, just get the spoke fixed and keep riding?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,176
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wheels, in my experience, require maintenance. This is especially true for light-weight wheels under heavier riders. How much maintenance have you done to the wheel in the 1000mi that you've owned them? Have you checked the spoke tension? Trueness? Adjusted the hub pre-load? It seems a bit strange that you'd manage to break a front spoke rather than the far more common drive-side rear spoke. Any chance you're sitting in the saddle as you traverse obstacles rather than "riding light"?

    My advice would be to call Easton, get the correct spoke sent out, under warranty if applicable, and keep riding the wheels. Just be aware that these sub-1600g wheels will require more maintenance than the heavier wheels that many Clydes ride.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So what wheels are many clydes riding?

  4. #4
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hand built wheels for a lot of us. I have 2 sets. one is a set of deep v's 32 front and rear with tiagra hubs and dt comp spokes and brass nipples. they are heavy as hell but I'm convinced they will never die (though somehow one of my BRASS nipples broke, I need to replace it as it released a little tension but not enough to really make the wheel go out of true.)

    My other set is a velocity fusion 32 holes with circusmonkey lightweight hubs and and dt revolution 1.8/1.5 on the front and rear drive side DT super comp and non drive side dt revolution 2.0/1.5 and alloy nipples all around. these wheels weigh in at 1583 grams AND have 32 spokes so they are truly the best of all worlds of being inexpensive, lightweight and durable. They are noticeably MUCH faster accelerating from a stand still than the deep v's

  5. #5
    Getting older and slower!
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Bowling Green, Kentucky
    My Bikes
    Trek Domane 6 series Project One, Trek Madone 6.9, Trek XO1
    Posts
    300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I broke a spoke on my rear wheel (also Eastom EA90). My first broken spoke in over 25 years riding. My LBS fixed it but said the other spokes were not the proper tension and I should have it rebuilt during the winter. But a few weeks later I broke another spoke. LBS sent it back to Easton and they sent me a new wheel.

    I have no complaints. And I have an awesome bike shop.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,402
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Kind of strange that it was a front spoke. I've never broken a front spoke, but have broken a good number of rears. Given that it was the first problem, I would fix it and keep riding and see if you have any more problems.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did hit a massive pothole last week that I did not see and was not able to prepare for. I wonder if that didn't weaken a spoke. How much does a set of hand built wheels set you back?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    483
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Liberty bell wasn't supposed to crack either. Sometimes things just do.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by abdon View Post
    Liberty bell wasn't supposed to crack either. Sometimes things just do.
    The Liberty Bell cracked due to a lack of understanding of metallurgy. I hope by now that my $600 wheelset with stainless steel spokes was built with a better understanding of metallurgy.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,176
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    The Liberty Bell cracked due to a lack of understanding of metallurgy. I hope by now that my $600 wheelset with stainless steel spokes was built with a better understanding of metallurgy.
    It was, but chances are your sub-1600g, 24/28-spoke wheelset wasn't designed to be rammed through a pothole under a 220lb rider. The EA90 is a solid wheel, but it can't work miracles! If you want a Clyde-worthy wheel, you should buy a Clyde-worthy wheel. If you want to ride an light-weight racing wheel, you're going to have to deal with their limitations...

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    It was, but chances are your sub-1600g, 24/28-spoke wheelset wasn't designed to be rammed through a pothole under a 220lb rider. The EA90 is a solid wheel, but it can't work miracles! If you want a Clyde-worthy wheel, you should buy a Clyde-worthy wheel. If you want to ride an light-weight racing wheel, you're going to have to deal with their limitations...
    The EA 90 SL wheel seems to be taking a lot of criticism here for being a sub 1600g wheel. This wheel is, afterall, the "clyde version" of the SLX wheel. With a spoke count of 24 front and 28 rear, this wheel is hardly underdesigned for a 220 lb rider. Many other reputable production wheels have fewer spoke counts and weigh considerably more.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,176
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    This wheel is, afterall, the "clyde version" of the SLX wheel.
    Wrong. The SLX is one of the lightest clincher wheelsets on the market. The SL is a slightly heavier, slightly stiffer, slightly more durable version of the SLX. It is still a very light wheelset and was not designed with Clydesdales in mind. Rather, it was designed for racers who want a wheel that can be used for everyday training as well as racing, or for those who appreciate a slightly stiffer wheel.

    That said, I own the EA90 SL and think it's a great wheelset. But I also realize that it's not going to tolerate being slammed through potholes as well as a 36-spoke Deep V-based wheelset that weighs close to 500-800g more...

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Wrong. The SLX is one of the lightest clincher wheelsets on the market.
    Wrong. Not even close. There plenty of wheels on the market weighing more than 100-200 grams less than the SLX - which by the way does not have a rider weight limit either.

    A wheel weighing 800 grams more is almost 2 pounds heavier. Obviously that wheel would be considered bullet proof, but the loss in performance would be huge. I'm sure the tipping point between performance and durability is somewhere well below an extra 2 pounds of weight. I do a lot of fast A & B club rides with guys who race Cat 4 and 5. Being a clyde, it's hard enough to keep up with these guys without ship anchor wheels.

    I was a big kid, and I used to beat the snot out of cheap K-mart bikes. We used to jump our bikes off curbs, homemade ramps, etc. I have snapped cranks, busted frame welds, bent handlbars, etc. But I have never had a spoke break on even a cheap bike with low quality alloy parts. I really don't believe that finding a good, light weight high performance racing wheel that can take the "punishment" of a 220 pound rider who is not deliberately beating the snot out of them should be such a chore. For what I pay for these wheels and with all the advanced materials technology, I expect nothing less.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA USA
    Posts
    3,125
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    I did hit a massive pothole last week that I did not see and was not able to prepare for. I wonder if that didn't weaken a spoke.
    It didn't. Inward rim deflections (as from weight on the wheel) cause a significant tension decrease in nearby spokes but negligible effects elsewhere in the wheel.

    Pot holes do bend rims at which point fewer spokes make a total collapse more likely and being able to get home by opening a brake release less likely.

    How much does a set of hand built wheels set you back?
    Ultegra hubs (not sexy, but with durable bearings that should last a very long time if lubricated) are about $120 a pair from UK on-line retailers, Velocity rims about $50 each from US on-line retailers, DT butted spokes $.69 each, and nipples $.13 or $273 for a 32/32 spoked pair plus labor.

    Boutique hubs or Powertaps, $750 US made carbon rims, and $3 aerospokes are all options if you want to spend more.

    With some mechanical inclination (I don't find wheel building more difficult than setting up a front derailleur, although it takes much longer) and enjoyment of that sort of thing labor is free when you do it yourself. When a rim wears out or bends in a crash you re-use the spokes (they last hundreds of thousands of miles when properly stress relieved and tensioned) and pay just $50 for the rebuild.

    Otherwise you're looking at $40-$100 a wheel plus tax and parts markup and may be paying for spokes everytime you wear out or bend a rim.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 08-22-11 at 01:37 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What are some good [US] online retailers to buy wheel parts?

  16. #16
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I bought my Deep V from JensonUSA. I paid $56 and picked it up as I live 5 miles from one of their facilities.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...eep-V+Rim.aspx

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,176
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    Wrong. Not even close. There plenty of wheels on the market weighing more than 100-200 grams less than the SLX - which by the way does not have a rider weight limit either.
    If you can find a dozen clincher wheels that are readily available and weigh less than the SLX's 1425g, I'd be surprised. There are a very few readily-available aluminum, clincher wheelsets that weigh 1325g or less and I'm not aware of any that hit your (mythical?) 1225g mark. If you ask Easton about weight limits, which I did when trying to decide between the EA90 SL and SLX, they'll tell you that they don't have weight limits... but that heavier riders may notice additional wheel flex and need to perform more frequent maintenance (read: truing, spoke replacement).

    A wheel weighing 800 grams more is almost 2 pounds heavier. Obviously that wheel would be considered bullet proof, but the loss in performance would be huge.
    Note that I said wheelset, not wheel. I suspect that if you did back-to-back tests with a power meter and different wheelsets that you'd be surprised how little difference weight makes. In my experience, the performance difference is mostly mental. My Garmin certainly can't tell the difference between my 1550g and 1900g wheels over my standard 30-mile training loop, and not much of a difference with my significantly heavier touring wheels... Data from the PowerTap wheelset would seem to back this up: weight differences of a few hundred grams simply don't make much of a difference.

    If you want to go faster, focus on aerodynamics not weight...

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA USA
    Posts
    3,125
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    Wrong. Not even close. There plenty of wheels on the market weighing more than 100-200 grams less than the SLX - which by the way does not have a rider weight limit either.

    A wheel weighing 800 grams more is almost 2 pounds heavier. Obviously that wheel would be considered bullet proof, but the loss in performance would be huge.
    A 145 pound climber atop a 15 pound bike would loose 1.2% of his speed up a steep hill which is 45 seconds an hour and a 200 pound Clydestale on a 20 pound bike would be down by .9%.

    On flat ground both riders would take an extra .1 kilojoules to propel themselves from zero to thirty MPH.

    At 300W average the 145 pound rider would be at most 0.4% slower in the standing 500 meters dropping 0.2 seconds from 52.2 to 52.4 seconds (I'm assuming the weight is entirely where the tire meets the road because that makes the math easy). The Clydestale would be at most .3% slower dropping from 55.6 to 55.8 seconds.

    The effect on flat ground speed would not be measurable assuming aerodynamics were the same; although higher weight on aluminum rims (DT 585 vs. 465/415 as in grams weight) often implies more depth (30.3mm on the 585 and 20.8mm on the box-section 465/415) which would make for a faster ride in spite of extra pounds.

    Except for psychological impact (perhaps by way of things like sound) the loss would be effectively non-existent except in some racing situations, like a climber who was otherwise competitive riding off the front to an up-hill finish in a mountain hill climb. In general the body shape which makes a good climber allows for about 2 pounds of body weight per inch of height and I doubt there are many 8'4" guys or 6'3" women here. Mutant genetics can do the trick too although it's unlikely Miguel Indurain is among us.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 08-23-11 at 03:10 AM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Where did the spoke break? If the spoke broke in mid span, the spoke may have been nicked or damaged which then created a stress concentration defect...if the spoke broke at the threads perhaps when the threads were "rolled" on to the spoke, perhaps the threads had a stress defect

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,293
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
    A 145 pound climber atop a 15 pound bike would loose 1.2% of his speed up a steep hill which is 45 seconds an hour and a 200 pound Clydestale on a 20 pound bike would be down by .9%.

    On flat ground both riders would take an extra .1 kilojoules to propel themselves from zero to thirty MPH.

    At 300W average the 145 pound rider would loose .2 seconds in a standing 500 meters dropping from 52.2 to 52.4 seconds.

    The effect on flat ground speed would not be measurable assuming aerodynamics were the same; although deeper weight on aluminum rims (DT 565 vs. 465) often implies more depth which would make for a faster ride in spite of the extra pounds.

    Except for psychological impact (perhaps by way of things like sound) the loss would be effectively non-existent except in some racing situations, like where a climber who was otherwise competitive was riding off the front to an up-hill finish in a mountain hill climb.
    But the magic is different, man! Don't you know?

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    If you can find a dozen clincher wheels that are readily available and weigh less than the SLX's 1425g, I'd be surprised. There are a very few readily-available aluminum, clincher wheelsets that weigh 1325g or less and I'm not aware of any that hit your (mythical?) 1225g mark. If you ask Easton about weight limits, which I did when trying to decide between the EA90 SL and SLX, they'll tell you that they don't have weight limits... but that heavier riders may notice additional wheel flex and need to perform more frequent maintenance (read: truing, spoke replacement).



    Note that I said wheelset, not wheel. I suspect that if you did back-to-back tests with a power meter and different wheelsets that you'd be surprised how little difference weight makes. In my experience, the performance difference is mostly mental. My Garmin certainly can't tell the difference between my 1550g and 1900g wheels over my standard 30-mile training loop, and not much of a difference with my significantly heavier touring wheels... Data from the PowerTap wheelset would seem to back this up: weight differences of a few hundred grams simply don't make much of a difference.

    If you want to go faster, focus on aerodynamics not weight...
    I'm the biggest proponent that lightweight bike components are way over emphasized these days. However, I absolutely reject the fact that a wheelset weighing almost 2 pounds more will have an undetectable performance affect. A few hundred grams, maybe. But 2 pounds, no way. I do not have a lot of experience with many different wheelsets, but it seems to be unamimous that upgrading wheels is the single most effective way to make a bike perform better. But here you are telling me that I could add 2 pounds to my wheelset and not notice a difference.

    Being a clyde, I lose time to the skinny guys in the hills. Aero bike components only make a difference at higher speeds. When you are climbing at 8 mph, there is not much benefit to a set of aero rims. For this reason, I need to run the wheels with the least amount of rotational resistance (inertia) as possible.
    Last edited by RiverHills; 08-23-11 at 05:53 AM.

  22. #22
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverHills View Post
    I'm the biggest proponent that lightweight bike components are way over emphasized these days. However, I absolutely reject the fact that a wheelset weighing almost 2 pounds more will have an undetectable performance affect. A few hundred grams, maybe. But 2 pounds, no way. I do not have a lot of experience with many different wheelsets, but it seems to be unamimous that upgrading wheels is the single most effective way to make a bike perform better. But here you are telling me that I could add 2 pounds to my wheelset and not notice a difference.

    Being a clyde, I lose time to the skinny guys in the hills. Aero bike components only make a difference at higher speeds. When you are climbing at 8 mph, there is not much benefit to a set of aero rims. For this reason, I need to run the wheels with the least amount of rotational resistance (inertia) as possible.
    I agree, I have a set of deep v's not for their aero properties but simply for their durability and i have another wheelset that is much much lighter and I feel and measure a noticeable performance improvement. I know the concept of "feel" can be misleading and I know that it's also tough to compare wheelsets under exact same conditions because I may be feeling stronger, the weather conditions may be different, etc. But if I take an average of a specific training loop that I ride in central park between the 2 wheelsets, the light wheelset is noticeably quicker. I will say that it is possible that i'm simply riding harder because mentally i know my "fast wheels" are on the bike.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA USA
    Posts
    3,125
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Being a clyde, I lose time to the skinny guys in the hills. Aero bike components only make a difference at higher speeds. When you are climbing at 8 mph, there is not much benefit to a set of aero rims. For this reason, I need to run the wheels with the least amount of rotational resistance (inertia) as possible.
    Rotational inertia only matters when you're accelerating (it's that whole f = ma thing; no a for acceleration means no extra force needed) but the numbers aren't significant and otherwise it's just weight.

    An extra 800g where the rubber meets the road takes .063 kilojoules to get from 0 to 20 MPH and another .080 kilojoules to spin up to 30. With spindly legs built for a 145 pound climber even I manage 19kj in a 1 minute interval, 75 in 5 minutes, and 148 in 10. It doesn't matter.

    Total weight does matter when climbing, although since speed is inversely proportional to total weight even 1000 grams are just a 1% difference when you're moving 1,000,000 as a Clydestale atop a 20 pound bike.

    If you want to keep up with the skinny guys in the hills, get your weight down to about 2 pounds per inch of height. Loose 60 pounds to drop from 200 to 140 as appropriate for a 5'10" climber and you'll be over a third faster up steep hills on a 20 pound bike, as in 13.8 MPH not 10 MPH.

    Loose 800 grams of weight (leave your 1000 lumen lamp home, sweat through a big water bottle, take a dump, get much lighter wheels) and you'll only gain .8% which may just register on your bike computer as your speed improves from 10 MPH to 10.08 for a 10.1 MPH reading).

    The gains for less contrived cases will be proportionally smaller like the 200g between a pair of light rims easily bent on road obstacles and deep ones that may last until you wear out the brake surfaces - choosing the lighter option will give a Clydestale at most .2% on that hill increasing his speed from 10 MPH to 10.02 MPH.

    Most guys wouldn't want to wear diamond earrings, bracelets, and other baubles like women but we do get a kick out of sports jewelery in black (carbon fiber) and grey (titanium) gold. We appreciate interesting mechanical design, with five valves better than two (even though they don't make our cars faster) and watches with complications are worth owning (even though they keep worse time than a $5 digital).

    I build wheels with 2.0/1.5 spokes and aluminum nipples because it's neat, I can, and it doesn't affect durability when you use long enough spokes and lubricate threads+sockets. It doesn't make me faster. I own carbon fiber forks, cranks, saddle rails, brake/shift levers, and derailleurs which are sexy. They don't make me faster either, but they do look like nice in a contemporary sort of way.

    I did not replace my 400 gram front rim with another of the same weight because it took just a season to bend after reaching Clydestale size (although over a decade at lesser weights didn't even require a return to the truing stand).

    Just be honest about it, accept your your gear lust for what it is, and don't make compromises that will have you limping home.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 08-23-11 at 02:15 PM.

  24. #24
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
    Just be honest about it and accept your your gear lust for what it is.
    How dare you!...While training for cimbing centuries, I frequent the same climbing course several times over 4 or 5 months. I'll switch from a lighter bike with lighter wheels, rims, hubs and tires, double crank, minus a frame pump to another bike with heavier tires (Armadillos), triple chainring, (more weight), Deep V rims and a frame pump.

    I'll do an 8 mile uphill timetrial, 6% grade 2,250 feet of climbing. I see a difference of 40 seconds but that could have been windspeed, the heat that day or the fact that the Cannondale is a stiffer frame than my Lemond. After several times with the same results, that's when you find that all that lighter wheel stuff is all the palcebo effect unless you need to shed .5 off a second on an uphill TT in the TDF.

    It's really strange when riders continue to preach lighter bikes, wheels, tires, time after time but yet, they will never stand a chance of keeping up on the ride.

    And the guys kicking my arse on rides, they'll continue to do so no matter what wheels they ride. I had a dude on a triple mid level bike kicking my arse on every ride. He finally went full custom and guess what, he still kicked my arse on every ride.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern Lancaster County, PA
    My Bikes
    2008 Trek 1.2
    Posts
    339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
    Just be honest about it, accept your your gear lust for what it is, and don't make compromises that will have you limping home.
    Accept my gear lust? If only you knew who you were talking to. My next bike will be a steel race frame. I hate anything carbon. I'm simply making the point that when climbing, light weight has more benefit than aerodynamics.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •