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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   I burn 6000 calories a day, without even lifting a finger. (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/763125-i-burn-6000-calories-day-without-even-lifting-finger.html)

Mithrandir 08-26-11 06:28 AM

I burn 6000 calories a day, without even lifting a finger.
 
At least that's what online nutrition sites tell me. I feel that this is hilariously inaccurate. I signed up for DailyBurn today to start tracking my food intake again. I tracked my calories about a year ago when I first started my weight loss, and somehow over time I simply stopped... I suspect my daily diet has increased in size above 2000 calories again so I'm trying to reanalyze things and figure out why I've plateaued at 99lbs.

Anyway, these sites... I input my health and activity levels, and they all give me insane numbers. I burn 5000-6000 calories a day without exercising. If I eat 4500 calories a day, I should be around 200 pounds within a year. I only need to exercise 2 hours a week. Etc.

YEAH RIGHT!!

Why do these sites give such ridiculous numbers? Is there just a lack of information about people who are severely overweight that the formulas are off the charts? Anyone have any similar experiences?

chefisaac 08-26-11 06:33 AM

I think its because everyone is an individual and its tough to bench mark on that when they write the programs.

UberGeek 08-26-11 06:36 AM

Odd... I used a BMR calculator just now, and assuming you are 5'10", 30 yo, and male, your BMR is about 2981.

This is the one I just used: http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

So, at 2000 calories, you only have a 900 calories daily deficit, which would lead to about 1 lb per week of weight loss (With no exercise).

One thing I'd suggest: Changing up your fitness routine. Sounds like your body (The wonderful, adaptable machine it is) has figured out how to stabilize weight with your current routine.

Are you currently doing interval training in there? If not, I'd suggest it. Are you walking, or just cycling? I'd toss in walking, maybe some jogging routine. Something akin to the "Couch to 5K" program, which will get you up to a decent clip in a decent time frame.

Mithrandir 08-26-11 06:37 AM

Agreed, but I am going to go out on a limb here and posit that no one burns 6000 calories as their basal metabolic rate. That's just an utterly insane number of calories; almost 2 pounds a day worth.

goldfinch 08-26-11 06:38 AM

The sites seem to work great for measuring calories in food, but I agree that they are wildly inaccurate and variable on calories burned. This is because variable is stacked upon variable, increasing error. It isn't like they stick some kind of power meter on people of all different ages, fitness levels, body fat composition, bone density, and who are riding fat tire bikes or skinny tire bikes up hill or down or with a head wind or tail wind and then make a calculator. Even so, it is interesting that the estimates seem invariably high. :)

goldfinch 08-26-11 06:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UberGeek (Post 13135111)
Odd... I used a BMR calculator just now, and assuming you are 5'10", 30 yo, and male, your BMR is about 2981.

This is the one I just used: http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

So, at 2000 calories, you only have a 900 calories daily deficit, which would lead to about 1 lb per week of weight loss (With no exercise).

One thing I'd suggest: Changing up your fitness routine. Sounds like your body (The wonderful, adaptable machine it is) has figured out how to stabilize weight with your current routine.

Are you currently doing interval training in there? If not, I'd suggest it. Are you walking, or just cycling? I'd toss in walking, maybe some jogging routine. Something akin to the "Couch to 5K" program, which will get you up to a decent clip in a decent time frame.

About two pounds, not one.

Mithrandir 08-26-11 06:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UberGeek (Post 13135111)
Odd... I used a BMR calculator just now, and assuming you are 5'10", 30 yo, and male, your BMR is about 2981.

This is the one I just used: http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

So, at 2000 calories, you only have a 900 calories daily deficit, which would lead to about 1 lb per week of weight loss (With no exercise).

One thing I'd suggest: Changing up your fitness routine. Sounds like your body (The wonderful, adaptable machine it is) has figured out how to stabilize weight with your current routine.

Are you currently doing interval training in there? If not, I'd suggest it. Are you walking, or just cycling? I'd toss in walking, maybe some jogging routine. Something akin to the "Couch to 5K" program, which will get you up to a decent clip in a decent time frame.

That seems a bit more realistic. I am not currently doing anything other than cycling. Walking and especially jogging are very rough on my knees and I cannot sustain them at any significant length of time. As soon as winter starts I'll be doing some nordic skiing, but that's still months away. I've been considering taking up kayaking, but I lack the room to store one, as well as worry about drowning. I suppose I could get a gym membership and use an elliptical, but one of the reasons I'm so gung-ho about cycling is the fact that I can go places and it isn't boring like gyms are.

chefisaac 08-26-11 06:44 AM

maybe hit the gym for HIIT with weights or throw in a day or two of going to an excerisse class.

UberGeek 08-26-11 06:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfinch (Post 13135118)
About two pounds, not one.

Yes, thank you. My mental math is not very good :lol:

UberGeek 08-26-11 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mithrandir (Post 13135129)
That seems a bit more realistic. I am not currently doing anything other than cycling. Walking and especially jogging are very rough on my knees and I cannot sustain them at any significant length of time. As soon as winter starts I'll be doing some nordic skiing, but that's still months away. I've been considering taking up kayaking, but I lack the room to store one, as well as worry about drowning. I suppose I could get a gym membership and use an elliptical, but one of the reasons I'm so gung-ho about cycling is the fact that I can go places and it isn't boring like gyms are.

Well, with walking/running shoes are the most critical component. Be prepared to spend about $90 on a pair. And, I noted you are in Buffalo. I'd suggest (If you choose to do the walk/run thing), stop by Fleet Feet to get your pair. They do a fitting/walk-run analysis; and you will walk out with the very best shoes for the activity you are aiming for.

I've got bad knees myself, and I'm assuming your weight has a lot to due with the knee pain there. Most places, and people, fit Clydes with a very cushioned sole, which is the absolute worst thing for the knees. Heavier folks need firmer heels.

And, if you plan to start the walk thing (I can't run, it really does a number on my knees now. Puts me out of commission for a day or two), let me know. I do a lap around the Delaware Park golf course basically every other day :)

TheTreauth 08-26-11 05:32 PM

The fitness industry is very much driven by profit. Sites that tell people what they want to hear (you can eat more and do less and still lose weight, etc) attract more people. So there's far more business in telling people what they want to hear than there is actually helping people reach tangible goals with accurate advice. It's sad but the fact is that the average person would rather take in the BS and remain brainwashed because it's easier to fail than it is to sacrifice and succeed. That then leaves the truly dedicated a cesspool of misinformation to sift through before they'll actually find out what they need to know to reach their fitness goals.

Mithrandir 08-26-11 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheTreauth (Post 13138231)
The fitness industry is very much driven by profit. Sites that tell people what they want to hear (you can eat more and do less and still lose weight, etc) attract more people. So there's far more business in telling people what they want to hear than there is actually helping people reach tangible goals with accurate advice. It's sad but the fact is that the average person would rather take in the BS and remain brainwashed because it's easier to fail than it is to sacrifice and succeed. That then leaves the truly dedicated a cesspool of misinformation to sift through before they'll actually find out what they need to know to reach their fitness goals.

Heh... good point. And if they help you lose all that weight, you won't need their services any longer, so they lose you as a customer! Brilliant!

shawmutt 08-26-11 06:35 PM

Well, I gained all my weight back because I stopped doing the healthy things that were working, but the guy at this podcast didn't. http://www.fat2fitradio.com/ They suggest finding out your BMR and eating the calories you would normally eat at your target weight.


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