Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Neil_B
    Guest

    "Fortune, good night .... turn thy wheel!"

    "Sors immanis
    et inanis,
    rota tu volubilis,
    status malus,
    vana salus
    semper dissolubilis....."

    - Carmina Burana codex

    Paisan and I heard the snap simultaneously.

    "Sounds like you broke a spoke, Neil."

    "It doesn't feel like I broke a spoke. I don't feel resistance when I pedal."

    And so we continued down the Pine Creek Rail Trail towards Jersey Shore, fist-pumping as we went. But soon enough the wheel began to drag. We pulled into a trailhead. I removed my panniers and Paisan spotted the problem immediately.

    "You didn't just break a spoke. You broke the hub flange. See here, it's broken at two spokes on the drive side."

    "So I guess the ride is over. We drove four hours so I could ride a bit more than nine miles."

    "It is what it is. I'll get the truck."

    "We didn't even make Jersey Shore. What a situation....."

    Later Paisan inspected the wheel and felt that the rim and the intact spokes could be used in the rebuild. He gave me specific advice on how to proceed, but since it's not the topic I want to discuss I'll keep it to myself.

    My questions for the group:

    The wheel is a 36 spoke 700 cc build my shop did for me Spring of 2009. It has 2500 miles on it. I've used the bike both on and offroad, on paved surfaces and bumpy canal towpaths. I've broken one spoke in 2009 and one in 2010. Is the hub failing a case of abuse on my part? Or am I victim of Fortune's wheel?

  2. #2
    Senior Member caphits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    My Bikes
    2006 DBR Podium 2
    Posts
    179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Google translate sucks...

    Google search awesome. What an appropriate poem. I know how yall feel.
    Cap-hits, not Caf-its

  3. #3
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by caphits View Post
    Google translate sucks...

    Google search awesome. What an appropriate poem. I know how yall feel.
    "Fate – monstrous
    and empty,
    you whirling wheel,
    stand malevolent,
    well-being is vain
    and always fades to nothing...."

  4. #4
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    North Texas 'Burbs
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    4,832
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Twp years and 2500 miles doesn't seem like enough for a flange to fail on a wheel, but sometimes it just happens. Many of your miles have been loaded touring, or at least with a trailer.

    I'm not sure if tow path surfaces would contribute or not. I don't have any experience in that arena.

  5. #5
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seems a little early for failure like that if you ask me. Did you ever take the wheel back after a few hundred miles for retentioning?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail
    Posts
    2,286
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_B View Post
    "We didn't even make Jersey Shore. What a situation....."
    I see what you did there...


    I was driving through PA down Route 15 last week and saw a sign for Jersey Shore. I laughed.

  7. #7
    not as fat as I was Biggziff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Upstate, NY
    My Bikes
    Trek 7000, Trek 5500, Fuji Newest 1.0
    Posts
    945
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Certainly doesn't seem like 2500 miles is enough to expect from a hand built wheel that was built to your specs by a shop that knows your size, etc. I'd contact the shop and if they pass I'd contact the hub manufacturer and express your concern about a potential manufacturing defect.
    humans can be so....rude

  8. #8
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by bautieri View Post
    Seems a little early for failure like that if you ask me. Did you ever take the wheel back after a few hundred miles for retentioning?
    Yes, it has been retrued as part of the bike's yearly maintenance.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jr59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    the 904, Jax fl
    Posts
    2,189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's really a hard one to call.

    That isn't many miles, although they were hard miles, loaded with weight!

    I would say it's Fortune's Wheel!

  10. #10
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Biggziff View Post
    Certainly doesn't seem like 2500 miles is enough to expect from a hand built wheel that was built to your specs by a shop that knows your size, etc. I'd contact the shop and if they pass I'd contact the hub manufacturer and express your concern about a potential manufacturing defect.
    I might as well let them know. Even if the hub is replaced, I need to have the wheel rebuilt.

  11. #11
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    I see what you did there...


    I was driving through PA down Route 15 last week and saw a sign for Jersey Shore. I laughed.
    Jersey Shore might be a sleep PA town with a funny name, but it's near the location of the declaration of independence from Great Britain. Not the important one, but the one by the landgrabbers known as the Fair Play Men:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Play_Men

  12. #12
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Just contacted my shop via email about the wheel. Let's see what they say.

  13. #13
    2nd Amendment Cyclist RichardGlover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cary, NC
    My Bikes
    Schwinn 2010 World Street, Handsome Speedy w/ SRAM Apex
    Posts
    1,037
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What kind of hub?

    Maybe it's time to upgrade to something more suited to the type of riding you do. Seems like you do some loaded touring, so a hub that's build to withstand that is probably what you want.
    DFL > DNF > DNS
    Clydesdales: Bringing the Horse Power
    Cycling Blog

  14. #14
    already soaked perspiration's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Chicago, IL
    My Bikes
    2011 Surly Crosscheck, 2014 Novara Randonee
    Posts
    272
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Oh, Fortuna, blind, heedless goddess, I am strapped to your wheel!"
    If it's peace you find in dying, and if dying time is near,
    Just bundle up my coffin 'cause it's cold way down there!

  15. #15
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee
    My Bikes
    2012 Kona Jake, 2009 Trek 1.2, 1997 Trek 6700
    Posts
    2,036
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by perspiration View Post
    "Oh, Fortuna, blind, heedless goddess, I am strapped to your wheel!"
    +1 !!!!!!

  16. #16
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by RichardGlover View Post
    What kind of hub?

    Maybe it's time to upgrade to something more suited to the type of riding you do. Seems like you do some loaded touring, so a hub that's build to withstand that is probably what you want.
    Shimano Deore 36 spoke.

  17. #17
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_B View Post
    Shimano Deore 36 spoke.
    Funny but I did a few centuries with another rider about my size. I used the 32 and he used the 36 spoke wheels. He preached over and over the importance of the 36 hole hub.

    I wondered if they were really not as strong since there is less material between each spoke hole since there were more holes. Tandems have more holes but have enlarged flanges to accommodate for the amount of holes and less material between each.

    As an inspector, I always wondered why they did not use a slightly large flange as well on the 36. Most parts specify minimum material allowances for durability and integrity requirements.

    His 36 hole hub lost a chunk of material between the spoke holes as well. Maybe I was correct in my choice to avoid the flanges with less material between the holes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •