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  1. #26
    2nd Amendment Cyclist RichardGlover's Avatar
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    40's and 50's?

    Get leg and arm warmers with a brushed lining.
    Get some full-fingered mid-weight gloves.
    Get an under-helmet beanie with ear flaps.
    Get a wind vest to wear over your jersey.
    Get toe covers for your cycling shoes (if you HAVE cyling shoes - otherwise, nevermind).

    Ride.
    DFL > DNF > DNS
    Clydesdales: Bringing the Horse Power
    Cycling Blog

  2. #27
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
    Not cycling specific, but Costco has Calvin Klein 100% merino wool men's V-neck sweaters for $20 in lots of sizes. They make excellent insulating layers.
    My experience has been the opposite, which is odd and surprising. Merino has to be the world's best base layer fabric, in any temperature. 90 degrees and sunny, I'll wear a light merino shirt to hike steep mountain trails. 20 degrees and it looks like snow? Merino base layer, top and bottom, plus other stuff, too. The stuff is made out of 100 % Grade-A wonderful. So it seems natural this would be the stuff of great insulating midlayers, too.

    Well, I wore a merino sweater (over a merino base layer and under a jacket) on a 35 mile loop, and, 10 miles in, I was starting to carry around a lot of sweat. I stopped at the halfway point for a bite to eat, and both my shirts were soaked, which meant a cold Forrest once the exercise stopped. Every time I did the same ride in a merino base layer and cashmere mid layer, with the same jacket, and there's very little sweat to be found. Better still, perspiration gets pulled away from the skin (because that's one of the awesome things merino does), and then seems to vanish at the next layer. A merino sweater was like a sponge, but a cashmere one ... I don't know, but it's magic. And it's $10 at the thrift store.

    That's really the best "tip" I've learned about exercising outdoors in the cold, in years.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  3. #28
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_B View Post
    These people never seem to be mentioned here:

    http://www.bicycleclothing.com/

    Here's the jacket. It's an unlined shell, very nice but since it doesn't look "roadie" I'm sure people will shun it. I find it very comfortable, and cut generously.



    Interesting. Their fit seems more generous than aerotech's. It's a pity, because I probably would have bought that had I known about the site before.

  4. #29
    Senior Member
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    I checked out the bicycleclothing.com site. Seems right up my alley. I'm glad I did a search rather than start another thread.

    In addition to the sizing issues that these guys seem to address, I like the fact that much of what I see looks like stuff that can be worn as regular apparel - which appeals to me as getting dressed in team colors and such really is not my style - irrespective of my weight.

    First question about jackets - breathable or non breathable. I saw a wind breaker that "repels light rain and breathes well". As I'm not a commuter, I'm thinking this might be a good choice. It does not appear to have uder arm ventilation though. I've also seen breathable and non breathable rain jackets. Both of these types appear to have underarm vents - which seems like a great idea for a guy my size. How well do these serve as windbreakers though.

    Like I said, I'm not a commuter so I'm not sure if I have the same concerns.. I'd like to be able to comfortably cycle in cooler temps. I likely won't be heading out when heavy rain is expected, but would like to have something that repels rain until I get back home. I cycle in an area that get some pretty intense winds coming off of Lake Erie. In the spring that generally means they are pretty cold as well.

    Any advice or recommendations appreciated.

  5. #30
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by dexter9326 View Post
    I checked out the bicycleclothing.com site. Seems right up my alley. I'm glad I did a search rather than start another thread.

    In addition to the sizing issues that these guys seem to address, I like the fact that much of what I see looks like stuff that can be worn as regular apparel - which appeals to me as getting dressed in team colors and such really is not my style - irrespective of my weight.

    First question about jackets - breathable or non breathable. I saw a wind breaker that "repels light rain and breathes well". As I'm not a commuter, I'm thinking this might be a good choice. It does not appear to have uder arm ventilation though. I've also seen breathable and non breathable rain jackets. Both of these types appear to have underarm vents - which seems like a great idea for a guy my size. How well do these serve as windbreakers though.

    Like I said, I'm not a commuter so I'm not sure if I have the same concerns.. I'd like to be able to comfortably cycle in cooler temps. I likely won't be heading out when heavy rain is expected, but would like to have something that repels rain until I get back home. I cycle in an area that get some pretty intense winds coming off of Lake Erie. In the spring that generally means they are pretty cold as well.

    Any advice or recommendations appreciated.
    The best general advice for cold weather I can give is layering. And be prepared to take off and add layers during the ride.

    Christmas Day, Bethlehem, PA, 2007. BTW, a "putz" is an ornamental nativity display. My Jewish friends assure me there's another meaning the Moravians didn't intend.... Anyway, note I'm wearing both a jacket and a sweatshirt on this 40 degree day.



    Same day, at the trailhead. Again, jacket, sweatshirt, long sleeved jersey, base layer, tights, wool socks. I found zipping and unzipping the various layers were enough to keep me from overheating or getting too cold.


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