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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-20-12, 05:30 PM   #1
Jay68442
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Wheelsets for clydes - ROL Race SLR or something else?

I know this question has been asked before but I haven't seen much info for ROL wheels. I shopping for new wheels and I haven't seen much that compares to the SRL in the way of price and weight. http://www.rolwheels.com/rol_race_slr_wheels.php

I'm 210 lbs and I want a strong aero wheel with a high spoke count at an affordable price. Looking to stay below $800. Any other suggestions?

Thanks Jason
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Old 01-20-12, 10:16 PM   #2
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Might want to look at the Velocity Fusion, strong, fairly light. I have them on my road bike with 36 spoke.

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Old 01-22-12, 11:49 PM   #3
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I think you'll find lots of posts about Neuvation wheelsets from BF members. Neuvation wheelsets are not Clyde specific, not high spoke count, but a great value. http://www.neuvationcycling.com/
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Old 01-23-12, 05:42 AM   #4
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You're right at their weight limit... At that price point for alloy wheels, I'd go custom. www.prowheelbuilder.com was great for me. Input your weight, riding type and pick out your components. Velocity Fusion or Deep V, pick your favorite hubs, spokes and nipples and go. You can play around a bit and see what prices are before making your final selection...
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Old 01-23-12, 07:37 AM   #5
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these dt swiss tricons via ebay are a great deal and they have a 220lb weight limit.. Have a friend who rides these exact wheels are they seem very solid.. at 1700g, not the lightest but in the sweet spot for a clyde..

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DT-Swiss-R17...item4ab30925a8

or if you want beefier and more aero the R1900's are a nice deal

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-DT-Swiss...item1c231a0b2d

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Old 01-23-12, 09:15 AM   #6
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Thank you guys. I will do some research on the items listed above.
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Old 01-23-12, 10:26 AM   #7
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I'm just a few pounds lighter than you, and wouldn't consider anything less than a 28h front, 32h rear for an everyday wheelset. With the larger tires I like, the newer breed of 23-24mm wide rims make sense. Find a qualified local builder and have them lace some Velocity A23 rims to a set of Ultegra hubs (32h front and rear, as I don't think Shimano make a 28h front Ultegra hub), with DT or Wheelsmith double butted spokes. You should be out the door for well under $500. If you want to through another $150-200 on the pile, you can always go for Dura Ace hubs, which do come in a 28 hole front drilling. It may be 150g lighter; but not really a better wheelset.

At our size, I'm also fond of larger tires, 28 or 32x700c on my commuter rigs, and 25 or 28x700c on the racier rigs. Some tires, like the Michelin ProRace 2, measure a little fatter than their 25mm marking. I have no use for 23s. Would have to pump 'em up to 110-120psi, and at that points, they ride like solid skateboard wheels. Typical is 90-95psi front, and 95-100psi rear, on Continental Grand Prix 4 seasons.

No, a quality larger tire does NOT slow you down.
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Old 01-23-12, 03:07 PM   #8
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28/32 wheels are overkill. I've got quite a few pounds on you, and I ride Mavic Aksiums and Neuvation M-28's every day. No problems in the past 3 years and close to 10,000 miles combined on them.
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Old 01-23-12, 03:33 PM   #9
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My current wheelset is mavic open sport 24/28
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Old 01-23-12, 03:33 PM   #10
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I'm riding a set of PSImet's @ 28f/2x and 32r/3x for a great price and I have 15 lbs on you.. Just request a qoute and Rob will get back to you with a couple of options...

http://www.psimet.com/

This set came out to 1742 grams. I ordered a second set with the same spoke count that will be in the 1570 gram range.






Williams system 30x
http://www.williamscycling.com/sys30x.html

Boyd Rouleur (choose the higher spoke count ones)
http://www.boydcycling.com/30mm-rouleur/

Boyd Vitesse (choose the higher spoke count ones)
http://www.boydcycling.com/30mm-vitesse/

Soul S3.0
http://www.bikesoul.com/2009/index.p...id=3&Itemid=11

Soul s4.0
http://www.bikesoul.com/2009/index.p...id=4&Itemid=12

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Old 01-23-12, 04:43 PM   #11
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I'm 210 lbs and I want a strong aero wheel with a high spoke count at an affordable price. Looking to stay below $800. Any other suggestions?
If you're interested in tubulars, you can get a 1,206 gram set for almost exactly your budget. You're 10 lbs over their weight limit, but, if you email the guy, he'll probably custom build you a set with extra spokes.

http://www.boydcycling.com/38mm-carbon-tubulars/

I can't say very much about them yet, because I'm waiting for delivery of mine.
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Old 01-23-12, 05:00 PM   #12
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28/32 wheels are overkill. I've got quite a few pounds on you, and I ride Mavic Aksiums and Neuvation M-28's every day. No problems in the past 3 years and close to 10,000 miles combined on them.
Enjoy, it is a free country.

From my perspective, I don't see where 50-100 grams, and 4 less spokes at both ends are going to make me any faster. What else does fewer spokes accomplish? Fewer spokes means lower a "factor of safety." Basically engineering geek speak for how overbuilt something is. If I break a spoke, I'm 99% certain at 200lbs, I can limp home on a 28/32 wheelset after perhaps a little truing. Don't feel a confident about most of the boutique wheels. YMMV.

That PSImet set looks nice and thoughtfully designed. Devil is in the details. Looks like he went with a deeper section rear (Kinlin XR-300?) and slightly shallower front (XR-270?).
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Old 01-23-12, 05:31 PM   #13
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28/32 wheels are overkill. I've got quite a few pounds on you, and I ride Mavic Aksiums and Neuvation M-28's every day. No problems in the past 3 years and close to 10,000 miles combined on them.
Absolutely correct.
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Old 01-23-12, 05:37 PM   #14
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Well I had a set a 36h centaur rear hub and had them built on Velocity aero w/dt spokes and they still came in at 950g, so just because it has a lot of spoke does not mean it has to be heavy.. I agree if a wheel is built well more spokes does not mean better..

my best wheelset is a campy eurus that is 16f / 21r and they are solid and I am 240lbs.
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Old 01-23-12, 06:53 PM   #15
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How do the 30mm vitesse compare to ROL race slr
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Old 01-23-12, 08:36 PM   #16
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You can also check out the Easton EA50 Aeros. I have had no issues and was at almost 280 when I started on them. Got my set for $400 on ebay.
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Old 01-23-12, 09:33 PM   #17
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That PSImet set looks nice and thoughtfully designed. Devil is in the details. Looks like he went with a deeper section rear (Kinlin XR-300?) and slightly shallower front (XR-270?).
Correct!!! Good eye's!! With the higher spoke count this wheelset is very stiff and the ride is outstanding....
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Old 01-24-12, 11:48 AM   #18
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ROL wheels get excellent reviews for their quality and customer service. I would suggest a phone call and see what they recommend. I myself am looking at some of the HED offerings with their Belgian C2 rims. From what I have been finding so far, they may be the ticket. They are the new generation wide rims at 23mm, and when built properly are fairly light at around 1600 grams. Some are using them for CX and claiming them to be bomb proof and Clyde friendly with what is called their Stallion build.

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Old 01-24-12, 12:02 PM   #19
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Enjoy, it is a free country.

From my perspective, I don't see where 50-100 grams, and 4 less spokes at both ends are going to make me any faster. What else does fewer spokes accomplish? Fewer spokes means lower a "factor of safety." Basically engineering geek speak for how overbuilt something is. If I break a spoke, I'm 99% certain at 200lbs, I can limp home on a 28/32 wheelset after perhaps a little truing. Don't feel a confident about most of the boutique wheels. YMMV.

That PSImet set looks nice and thoughtfully designed. Devil is in the details. Looks like he went with a deeper section rear (Kinlin XR-300?) and slightly shallower front (XR-270?).
I don't really care about the weight. I'm just stating that there is no need to get a custom-built set of wheels when there are off-the-shelf wheels that work fine. If you have the money to spare, then by all means get custom wheels. If I had money burning a hole in my pocket I'd probably be riding custom wheels myself. But, I don't, so I'm not.

As for riding home... about 25 miles into a 45 mile ride I broke the hub on one of my Neuvations. The spoke head pulled through the flange. I zip-tied the loose spoke to the neighboring spoke and rode the rest of the way. I did open up my rear brake caliper slightly.

The wheel was replaced under warranty (three years after I bought it).
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Old 01-24-12, 01:26 PM   #20
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and I ride Mavic Aksiums and Neuvation M-28's every day. No problems in the past 3 years and close to 10,000 miles combined on them.



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about 25 miles into a 45 mile ride I broke the hub on one of my Neuvations. The spoke head pulled through the flange.

Something doesn't add up here, low spoke count, higher tension. Not sure where the "never had a problem" comes in with these low spoke count wheels.

Dividing up the 10,000 between the 2 sets, over 3 years?.......A problem like that with only 5000 miles is not a good track record when it comes to wheel durability claims.
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Old 01-24-12, 01:51 PM   #21
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I know this question has been asked before but I haven't seen much info for ROL wheels. I shopping for new wheels and I haven't seen much that compares to the SRL in the way of price and weight. http://www.rolwheels.com/rol_race_slr_wheels.php

I'm 210 lbs and I want a strong aero wheel with a high spoke count at an affordable price. Looking to stay below $800. Any other suggestions?

Thanks Jason
First choice: learn to build wheels (school children have done a fine job after reading _The Bicycle Wheel_), lace the appropriate commodity rim of your choice (Velocity Deep V, DT RR585, Kinlin XR300 although I don't like how tires mount or the manufacturing consistency in the Kinlins) to Shimano or 2000-2006 Campagnolo hubs at the Centaur level and above, validate tension with a Park meter, and be happy.

Second choice: pay some some one else to do that. The ROLs are probably Kinlin XR300s although I'd check on that. I'd opt for a one-man shop with a good reputation (psimet, peter white, etc.) since that means you know your wheels are being built by some one competent. While an under tensioned wheel built by some guy in a formerly reputable shop that won't stay true is mildly annoying a front wheel that folds due to his incompetence really sucks (I pretty much stopped delegating wheel builds at that point).

When you wear out the brake track or crash the wheel the standard parts mean you can get a new rim for $35-$75, move nipples over one at a time, tension and true, and are back on the road. Add $45-$90 in labor plus spokes for $1-$3 each (people won't want to bet their reputation on the fatigue resulting from the last builder's job, and retail price on aero spokes is really high) if you have some one else do the deed.

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Old 01-24-12, 02:32 PM   #22
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Something doesn't add up here, low spoke count, higher tension. Not sure where the "never had a problem" comes in with these low spoke count wheels.

Dividing up the 10,000 between the 2 sets, over 3 years?.......A problem like that with only 5000 miles is not a good track record when it comes to wheel durability claims.
Okay, so I take back saying "never had a problem". But, it was fixed within 2 days under warranty, so one thing in the few years I've used it is not an issue for me. That problem was on the second ride, so obviously it was a manufacturing flaw, and one that John at Neuvation said he has only seen happen once before. Every wheel (even expensive hand-built wheels) can suffer from unseen flaws in the manufacturing from the components. I honestly couldn't count how many rides they've been on since then.

As for mileage, that's a guess. I honestly have no idea how many miles are on them. I switch wheels around between my bikes all the time, so it's hard to say how many miles they actually have. I'd say a conservative estimate is probably 7000, but again, I have no idea. Some people religiously track their miles. I don't. It could be much less than that or much more.

They are the wheels I ride the most. Not because I prefer them over my Mavics, but because I have the cassette on them I like the best for the rides I do most of the time, and since I have spare wheels, I just switch the whole wheel instead of swapping cassettes.
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Old 01-24-12, 02:37 PM   #23
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That problem was on the second ride, so obviously it was a manufacturing flaw, and one that John at Neuvation said he has only seen happen once before. .
Of course they are going to say they've only seen it once before, they are trying to sell a product with low spoke count, low weight and cool factor. FTR, another poster here (JustMe) had the same problem with his wheels.

Funny that the only two cases John has seen happen to be of forum members....just sayin'
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Old 01-24-12, 02:42 PM   #24
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I don't know. He stands behind his stuff. That's all I need. Show me a wheel manufacturer that has never had a failure. I know someone who has broken three sets of Zipps just riding them. No crashes. Does that mean Zipps are bad wheels?

I mean, honestly, if someone wants to buy me a set of high-dollar custom wheels, I'll PM you my address. Until then, I'll gladly roll around on my Neuvations and have no problem doing it.
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Old 01-24-12, 03:05 PM   #25
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I don't know. He stands behind his stuff. That's all I need. Show me a wheel manufacturer that has never had a failure. I know someone who has broken three sets of Zipps just riding them. No crashes. Does that mean Zipps are bad wheels?
No, but that rider shouldn't post "never had a problem".

I guess my point is that to many posters have said "never had a problem" when in fact that isn't true. I see one poster constantly posting that he has never had a problem while riding a carbon frame. When in fact, I remember HIS post a few years back stating that he was sending his frame back to the mfgr for repair after snapping on a ride, no crash.

I would be wrong to say I have never had a problem with an aluminum Lemond frame. It was handled and replaced for free but wrong to say I never had a problem in a "how is alum for a clyde" thread whether it be my massive strength () or mfg issue.
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