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  1. #1
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    First post, looking for advice.

    My wife and I have been talking about getting bikes for awhile now. We received our tax money and decided we would invest and finally get some bikes. We went to a LBS tonight and were testing a few out and I really liked the feel of these two bikes:

    http://www.precisionbikeshop.com/sto...nevada-29-2-0/

    http://www.precisionbikeshop.com/sto...-absolute-3-0/

    Now, I am 6'1" 250 pounds. I really liked the feel of the absolute over the nevada MTB. I also want a more hybrid/road bike. But my concern is my size. I have friends who regularly go on 20+ mile rides and I would like to eventually be riding along with them. They both ride nice road bikes and I am worried if I get the MTB, while it is beefier, would just hinder me from doing the riding I want to do. My only real concern on the Absolute was the wheel set. I know I could swap it out for something larger but I dont have a lot of money to be throwing out right off the bat.

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Get a road bike with 36 spokes wheels and have fun.

    Here is my son-in-law at 260 lbs having fun.

    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
    Senior Member tergal's Avatar
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    Have to agree with the above, i have a mountain bike with thin tyres ( tires) for road , it is good and i love my bike but i would not put my self in the same field as a road bike .

    on the flip side , i can hit a gravel path at speed and not cry

    anyway welcome to the forum , all ways good to have new people
    Tact is for people who arenít witty enough to use sarcasm.

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  4. #4
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    If your goal is to eventually go on 20+ mile road rides with your friends, and they have road bikes, you should get a road bike. I haven't met anyone yet that regularly rides moderate to longer distances (20 - 50 miles) on the road that is happy riding something other than a road bike. I believe that drop bars are critical to staying comfortable on a long road road ride.

    Hey, I made the mistake of buying a hybrid and comfort bike before buying a road bike. Ask your friends, why don't they ride something other than a road bike on the road rides?

    But, if these bikes are what will get you riding, by all means, buy one and get in the saddle... you can buy a road bike later when funds aren't so tight. Have you looked at bikesdirect.com? they have budget friendly bikes.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Dave P's Avatar
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    CMC:

    Well heck, get one of each.

    I tried starting out on a road bike and felt uncomfortable. Switching to a mountain bike has kept me riding.

  6. #6
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    Wow, thanks for the quick and awesome replies. A little more info and something that actually makes it more difficult. I am not against getting a road bike, but my wife wants to have the option for lite trails and some off road capabilities. I see where she is coming from but I just cant see when we would do it. We have a 2 and a half year old that for a little while longer will at least need to be in a tow trailer. So, knowing that, trails are pretty much out of the question for at least another year. Maybe I will go back tomorrow and see what else my options are for 700 dollars, tops.

    EDIT:
    I looked at bikesdirect.com and never got a clear idea on what 90% assembled means. I know how to turn a wrench but dont want to save a few hundred to have to turn around and spend in at a LBS to have them assemble my bike.

  7. #7
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    My road bike...grandson love the trailer rides.

    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  8. #8
    Senior Member tergal's Avatar
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    You might end up following the path i have , i have a mountain bike as i said, but i am looking for a old road bike that i can work on and build up so A i learn and B i save money .

    the way i figured if you get a road you can not go on trails if you get a mountain you can do both but less efficiently. How serious is the other half about the trails, if she is willing to wait a year till the kid is not a issue then you have a year to save up for the mountain bike.

    Edit: sorry mate i just saw how i put that, i don't mean the kid is a issue ouch that came out wrong...
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  9. #9
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    lol, no worries, when it comes to trail riding the kid is the issue haha. Also, she is thinking about getting that Fuji Absolute so, she isnt even getting a mountain bike. Tomorrow morning I am going to go to a few other shops and see what is in my price bracket.

  10. #10
    Senior Member tergal's Avatar
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    yea i would have a look at some LBS, the two near me are great. If they try to tell you, that you can't do it for your budget ( within reason) find a different store till you find one who is happy to work with you in your price.
    Last edited by tergal; 02-09-12 at 01:14 AM. Reason: edited to be english x2
    Tact is for people who arenít witty enough to use sarcasm.

    Early helplessness is the price we pay for later brilliance. Or, at least our later capacity for non-idiocy

  11. #11
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    Within the "road bike" world, there is a category called "cyclocross bikes". They are built to take a bit more abuse and handle a heavier weight load (often with higher spoke count/stronger wheels and wider tires). My first road bike (when I was 265 pounds) is a cyclocross model - specifcally a Kona Jake. I have almost 1500 miles on it and have had no problems with the "stock" configuration. As I lose more weight I will look to move to thinner tires, but for now, I am delighted with the road profile of this bike and with the confidence in its ability to safely bear my weight.

    The "touring" category also has some of these same charateristics, but often in a heavier bike and not very many configuration choices.

  12. #12
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    +1 on the cyclocross or touring bike. The geometry is less agressive than a road race type bike and they are generally just a bit heavier but significantly stronger. Cyclocross bikes can use canti/v-brake brakes and both types of bikes usually have plenty of places for waterbottles and racks if you so desire. A lot of people recommend 36-spoke wheels for heavier riders, but just having 36-spokes doesn't make the wheel neccesarily the right choice. There are high quality 32-spoke wheels available with doublewall rims, eyelets, heavy SS spokes, and good hubs. Handbuilt in the proper configuration they will hold up just fine for the heavier rider. Granted, a 36-spoke wheel will be stronger than an equivalent quality 32-spoke wheel, I'm just saying that if a bike comes stock with good quality 32-spoke wheels designed for cyclocross or touring, it isn't a deal breaker. Quality of build and quality of components is more important than number of spokes. Cyclocross and touring bikes usually have medium width rims that will take a 700x28 or 700x32 tire which will be reasonably quick but more comfortable than a thin 700x23 or 700x25 road tire.
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  13. #13
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    Also, be sure to check Craigslist. Some very good deals can be had if you are careful and are willing to take a drive (sometimes).

  14. #14
    Senior Member GettinMyLanceOn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmcgarvey View Post
    Wow, thanks for the quick and awesome replies. A little more info and something that actually makes it more difficult. I am not against getting a road bike, but my wife wants to have the option for lite trails and some off road capabilities. I see where she is coming from but I just cant see when we would do it. We have a 2 and a half year old that for a little while longer will at least need to be in a tow trailer. So, knowing that, trails are pretty much out of the question for at least another year. Maybe I will go back tomorrow and see what else my options are for 700 dollars, tops.

    EDIT:
    I looked at bikesdirect.com and never got a clear idea on what 90% assembled means. I know how to turn a wrench but dont want to save a few hundred to have to turn around and spend in at a LBS to have them assemble my bike.
    I would go local so you can make sure the bike fits you right. Bikesdirect may be cheaper, but if the bike doesn't fit, you'll have to ship it back. I recommend you getting a road bike if you'll be sticking to the pavement.

  15. #15
    Senior Member RollCNY's Avatar
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    Get a pair of Absolutes. Install Ergon grips, with bar ends (lots of models to chose from). If you find you do trails, put on 32 or 35 knobbies. As to the "you can't go more than 20+ miles on flat bars", I have ridden mine on several 100 mile plus rides, many 75 mile plus, and a plethora of 50 mile + rides. And I rode a Specialized Sirrus (very similar to the Absolute) with roadies many many times. I'm not saying everyone can do it, but distance and speed have little to do with the bike.

    Worry about wheels when and if they break. It usually isn't catastrophic.

  16. #16
    Senior Member GettinMyLanceOn's Avatar
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    My roomie has an Absolute 3.0, and I can't say I'd recommend it just because it's very bottom of the line. If you don't see yourself getting into cycling too seriously, then the Absolute will be fine, but there are better bikes in your price range. I just can't see flat bars being good unless you're riding on rough terrain, anyway. Drop bars get you into a better position, and I feel like it also strengthens your upper body/core better as you have to maintain good posture.

  17. #17
    Senior Member iforgotmename's Avatar
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    A cross bike is a great choice for an all around bike but will be tough to find for $700 tops. I have both a tourer and a cross bike and they are both great road and trail bikes, the cross bike is far better off road obviously.

    While there is nothing at all wrong with a road bike a cross bike gives you more options. I think I would stay away from a mountain bike if you want to hang with the fast guys.

  18. #18
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    So, this morning I settled on a Jamis Coda sport I found at another bike shop. Went for a two mile ride this afternoon with my trailer and kids in tow. Besides my 5 year old significantly weighing down the trailer, I loved it. I live on an Air Force base, my wife is military, and I mapped out a nice 5.3 mile loop around the whole base that is my goal to build up to right now. The gentleman who owns the shop is a bigger guy and says, as long as I stay on pavement this bike will hold up no problem for me. He started riding at 340 pounds and is now down to 220 so I am a little inclined to take his word. He also gave us a sweet deal on a nice Bianchi Cordina for my wife, which she fell in love with as soon as she got on it.

    EDIT: I see people saying drops are better then flat bars. At the LBS they were showing me a Jamis Ventura that was a little more then what I spent on the Coda but completely doable. The one thing that steered me away was I have read a lot of complaints about pulling a tow trailer with a road bike and how hills can become damn near impossible. I live in northern California so, there is no shortage of hills here. If I am at a misunderstanding then maybe I will go and give the ventura another look.
    Last edited by cmcgarvey; 02-10-12 at 05:51 PM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member tergal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmcgarvey View Post
    So, this morning I settled on a Jamis Coda sport I found at another bike shop. Went for a two mile ride this afternoon with my trailer and kids in tow. Besides my 5 year old significantly weighing down the trailer, I loved it. I live on an Air Force base, my wife is military, and I mapped out a nice 5.3 mile loop around the whole base that is my goal to build up to right now. The gentleman who owns the shop is a bigger guy and says, as long as I stay on pavement this bike will hold up no problem for me. He started riding at 340 pounds and is now down to 220 so I am a little inclined to take his word. He also gave us a sweet deal on a nice Bianchi Cordina for my wife, which she fell in love with as soon as she got on it.

    EDIT: I see people saying drops are better then flat bars. At the LBS they were showing me a Jamis Ventura that was a little more then what I spent on the Coda but completely doable. The one thing that steered me away was I have read a lot of complaints about pulling a tow trailer with a road bike and how hills can become damn near impossible. I live in northern California so, there is no shortage of hills here. If I am at a misunderstanding then maybe I will go and give the ventura another look.
    for all the advice in the world , the right bike is the one you are riding and having fun now where is our photos
    Tact is for people who arenít witty enough to use sarcasm.

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  20. #20
    Senior Member iforgotmename's Avatar
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    The coda is a great bike...my son has one. nice choice.

  21. #21
    Senior Member RollCNY's Avatar
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    Looks like you did fine. I have never known drops vs flats to make a difference hill climbing, but never tried either with a trailer. Technique makes way more difference hill climbing than bars, IMO. Check out Ergon grips when you get a chance, best upgrade to a hybrid ever. That isn't my opinion. That is gospel.

  22. #22
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    I haven't met anyone yet that regularly rides moderate to longer distances (20 - 50 miles) on the road that is happy riding something other than a road bike. I believe that drop bars are critical to staying comfortable on a long road road ride.
    Pleased to meet you, now you have. My average ride is 25-35 miles and toward the end of last summer I was riding 50+ at least once a week, all on either a homebuilt hybrid or a flat barred touring bike. +1 on the Ergon grips. I have GC2s on my touring bike and have the GR2s off of my soon to be sold MTB based hybrid, which will go on the 700c Plan B/Trail/Foul Weather/Winter bike that will be my summer project. I've got nothing against drop bars and recently bought my first drop barred road bike, which I got primarily for faster but fairly short (<30 mile) group rides. It's faster and reasonably comfortable, but I still enjoy cruising on my touring bike and will probably continue to use it at least as much as the drop barred bike. I still haven't decided which I will use for my first organized centuries this summer.
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  23. #23
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    Great bike to start getting out there with! I wanted a Coda but could not find one, and got a nice deal on my Sirrus (which I do love!). I personally prefer Flat bars over drops, but I have installed bar ends to give my hands a change in position...I have done near 30 miles on flat bars (mountain bike) with no bar ends, it was no big deal. I prefer the more upright position of flat bars, as well as I am just used to them, and feel more confident on them. I owned a road bike for 3 years, it just wasn't for me. Of course I then gained weight and I am not as fast on the Sirrus, but that is not the bike's fault, its just as quick if I push it

    Ride what you like and like what you ride! Good luck to you and hope you get into cycling, its the most enjoyable sport I have found...
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  24. #24
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tergal View Post
    for all the advice in the world , the right bike is the one you are riding and having fun now where is our photos
    I agree 100%. Who knows; after a couple of years, you may want a nice drop bar road bike too. I bought a nice roadie a year ago, and now I'm looking at getting a flat bar hybrid with disc brakes to use as a commuter/all around bike and saving the roadie for longer weekend rides and triathlons.

  25. #25
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
    If your goal is to eventually go on 20+ mile road rides with your friends, and they have road bikes, you should get a road bike. I haven't met anyone yet that regularly rides moderate to longer distances (20 - 50 miles) on the road that is happy riding something other than a road bike. I believe that drop bars are critical to staying comfortable on a long road road ride.
    I'm quite happy riding a mountain bike on the road, although I put more road-friendly tyres on it (Schwalbe Marathon Plus on the front and Marathon Extreme on the rear).

    I find standard flat handlebars leave me wanting more hand positions but if you put bar ends (bull horns) on the bars you can get the alternative hand positions on a bike with flat bars.

    As someone already said on a MTB (or a cross bike, which looks much like a road bike) you can also ride on gravel. I've noticed that on smooth surfaces I'm significantly faster on the cross bike than I am on the MTB, so for riding with friends who were on road bikes I'd take the cross bike. I'd probably be faster still on a road bike but I like the freedom to go onto trails any time I want to, and would rather keep that freedom than gain a bit more speed.

    Check your weight against the maximum rating of the bikes you're looking at. When I started riding I was slightly north of 280 and was a little over the recommended maximum load on my MTB, but figured I'd be OK because I was within the maximum rating for rider and anything they were carrying. I just didn't carry anything... at first not even a bottle of water because I wasn't going far enough to need it.

    For myself if I had to cut back to only have one bike I'd take the cross bike (mine is a 2009 Specialized Tricross) and put Marathon Extreme tyres on it. That gives me speed on the road albeit less than a pure road bike, decent traction on trails and the ability to go anywhere I'm likely to want to go. I wouldn't take it through full-on MTB territory - the bike would probably cope but the rider probably wouldn't.
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