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-   -   I'm Convinced These are the Secrets to Getting Lean (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/797588-im-convinced-these-secrets-getting-lean.html)

GettinMyLanceOn 02-09-12 07:33 AM

I'm Convinced These are the Secrets to Getting Lean
 
I just want to share what I've learned works for me. Although I haven't really been that overweight in recent times, these rules are what work for me to burn fat, while maintaining muscle mass/strength. I currently do a full-body workout 3 days a week, focused on compound lifts and strength, and cycle almost daily. The cycling is a new hobby of mine, but it's definitely something I see becoming a lifestyle. I know not much of this is really groundbreaking, but I hope it's helpful.

Exercise:
  • Lift weights at least 3 times a week.
  • Do some form of med-high intensity cardio for at least an hour a day.
  • Rest days - 1 day a week maximum-- I like to do this on Sunday where I maybe do a little cardio, but mainly just veg out and let my body recover.

Nutrition:
  • #1. As long as you are following the exercise rules, you should eat until you're satisfied. If you think you ate a bit too much that day, just go for a longer ride. You'll learn how much nourishment your body needs after time.
  • Lots of water. Try to picture drinking around two gallons a day.
  • Eat a ton of protein. (if gaining muscle/maintaining muscle is a goal)
  • Get enough carbs to keep your energy up.
  • Whole foods are better, obviously.
  • Fruits and veggies are great.
  • Nothing wrong with nuts. I don't care what people say about the fat in nuts. I tested this out by eating over a pound of peanuts/PB almost daily for two weeks. Lost almost five pounds while still increasing strength in gym and cycling. Nuts are a great source of protein, healthy fats, and several nutrients. Then again, this was at 6' 2'' and just under 200lbs, so YMMV.

goldfinch 02-09-12 07:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GettinMyLanceOn (Post 13829346)
I just want to share what I've learned works for me. Although I haven't really been that overweight in recent times, these rules are what work for me to burn fat, while maintaining muscle mass/strength. I currently do a full-body workout 3 days a week, focused on compound lifts and strength, and cycle almost daily. The cycling is a new hobby of mine, but it's definitely something I see becoming a lifestyle. I know not much of this is really groundbreaking, but I hope it's helpful.

Exercise:
  • Lift weights at least 3 times a week.
  • Do some form of med-high intensity cardio for at least an hour a day.
  • Rest days - 1 day a week maximum-- I like to do this on Sunday where I maybe do a little cardio, but mainly just veg out and let my body recover.

Nutrition:
  • #1. As long as you are following the exercise rules, you should eat until you're satisfied. If you think you ate a bit too much that day, just go for a longer ride. You'll learn how much nourishment your body needs after time.
  • Lots of water. Try to picture drinking around two gallons a day.
  • Eat a ton of protein. (if gaining muscle/maintaining muscle is a goal)
  • Get enough carbs to keep your energy up.
  • Whole foods are better, obviously.
  • Fruits and veggies are great.
  • Nothing wrong with nuts. I don't care what people say about the fat in nuts. I tested this out by eating over a pound of peanuts/PB almost daily for two weeks. Lost almost five pounds while still increasing strength in gym and cycling. Nuts are a great source of protein, healthy fats, and several nutrients. Then again, this was at 6' 2'' and just under 200lbs, so YMMV.


I think you make a lot of good points. Especially that exercise is key for keeping off lost weight. I also upped my protein intake when I started my weight loss and have kept it high now that I am doing work with weights. However, for me I can never eat until I am satisfied, even with exercising more than an hour a day six days a week, which I am pretty dang religious about. I have no apparent off switch on my appetite. I have trouble recognizing "full" signals until I am way past full. Give me a buffet and 3000 calories can disappear into this 106 pound body. There is a range to my hunger though. I have far more trouble keeping it in check if I eat too many carbs, especially pure sugary sweets, and a higher protein diet seems to help me some in controlling my desire to eat.

cmcgarvey 02-09-12 09:29 AM

You have some great points. A few that are a bit cross. Water, a minimum is half your body weight in ounces. I way 250 so I need 125 ounces of water to maintain. When it comes to food, JOURNAL, when I was over 300, logging every single thing I ate helped me get down to 240 in just a four months. Your workout tips was exactly what I did, every week. Also, anyone who says nuts are a bad snack need a light smack upside the head. Obviously, pounding a whole can of nuts is a bad snack. But a properly portioned snack of nuts is incredibly healthy. The fat in nuts is similar to the fat in fish. In proper sizes its very healthy for you. When it comes to protein and carbs, typically, unless you are a body builder, your caloric goal is like 45% carb, 30% protein and 25% fat. You will find different values, but they are usually right around that. But, I digress, getting into carbs and proteins will turn into a small book being written if you really want to get into the details.

maidenfan 02-09-12 11:00 AM

There is a lot of diet advice out there, so figuring out what works for you is a key component.

Seattle Forrest 02-09-12 11:12 AM

Great advice in genereal.

Quote:

Originally Posted by GettinMyLanceOn (Post 13829346)
Nothing wrong with nuts. I don't care what people say about the fat in nuts. I tested this out by eating over a pound of peanuts/PB almost daily for two weeks. Lost almost five pounds while still increasing strength in gym and cycling. Nuts are a great source of protein, healthy fats, and several nutrients. Then again, this was at 6' 2'' and just under 200lbs, so YMMV.

A small handful of almonds is kind of filling. More so than a lot of other snacks you could have. Perfect when you get hungry at work. I think the combination of protein and fat lets triggers something in your body, sort of a "don't worry, there's no starvation coming" message.

freighttraininguphill 02-09-12 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest (Post 13830185)
A small handful of almonds is kind of filling. More so than a lot of other snacks you could have. Perfect when you get hungry at work. I think the combination of protein and fat lets triggers something in your body, sort of a "don't worry, there's no starvation coming" message.

Yes it is! It doesn't help that I live about a mile away from the Blue Diamond almond plant. I've tried every flavor they have, and almost every one of them is delicious!

TrojanHorse 02-09-12 11:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maidenfan (Post 13830135)
There is a lot of diet advice out there, so figuring out what works for you is a key component.

I'd tweak that and say that DOING something is key. And not fooling yourself.

paisan 02-09-12 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GettinMyLanceOn (Post 13829346)
[*]Nothing wrong with nuts. I don't care what people say about the fat in nuts. I tested this out by eating over a pound of peanuts/PB almost daily for two weeks. Lost almost five pounds while still increasing strength in gym and cycling. Nuts are a great source of protein, healthy fats, and several nutrients. Then again, this was at 6' 2'' and just under 200lbs, so YMMV.[/LIST]

I agree with this statement about nuts. I eat alot of seeds/nuts in my diet but you're off on one point. Peanuts are not nuts, they are legumes. Nutritionally they are similar to nuts but if you're on a diet that restricts legumes(for example Paleo) then peanuts are off limits.

RedC 02-09-12 11:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfinch (Post 13829411)
I think you make a lot of good points. Especially that exercise is key for keeping off lost weight. I also upped my protein intake when I started my weight loss and have kept it high now that I am doing work with weights. However, for me I can never eat until I am satisfied, even with exercising more than an hour a day six days a week, which I am pretty dang religious about. I have no apparent off switch on my appetite. I have trouble recognizing "full" signals until I am way past full. Give me a buffet and 3000 calories can disappear into this 106 pound body. There is a range to my hunger though. I have far more trouble keeping it in check if I eat too many carbs, especially pure sugary sweets, and a higher protein diet seems to help me some in controlling my desire to eat.

It took me three years to figure out I can't ride faster than I can eat. :( I finally started tracking what I eat and the weight is coming down. I lost about 40 lbs the first year I was riding but I added 20 back since last May even though I'm riding more than ever.

jethro56 02-09-12 12:03 PM

I think the OP's post is probably sound for someone like himself. I kinda fit into his program after 2 1/2 years of the journey. I'm a 3 day a week resistance trainer but at 55 the high intensity stuff I have to limit to 3 days a week. The other 3 days a week is for low intensity recovery stuff. I take one day off a week and it drives me dingy. For most newbies this program is way too much. If there's a secret it's patience and consistency.

goldfinch 02-09-12 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jethro56 (Post 13830408)
If there's a secret it's patience and consistency.

Well said!

GettinMyLanceOn 02-09-12 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paisan (Post 13830300)
I agree with this statement about nuts. I eat alot of seeds/nuts in my diet but you're off on one point. Peanuts are not nuts, they are legumes. Nutritionally they are similar to nuts but if you're on a diet that restricts legumes(for example Paleo) then peanuts are off limits.

I had no idea. You would think they'd be nuts with the word nut in them?

tony_merlino 02-09-12 01:35 PM

I think it really depends on what you're trying to achieve. My own experience is that losing weight is all about diet, with exercise playing a supporting (but not major) role. The routine the OP describes is about a lot more than "getting lean". It's great if you have the commitment and the time. I really don't have the time to exercise 2+ hours a day, and really don't want to spend my life that way. I need time to work, spend time with my kids, read, write, play music, walk, ... and ride a bike. So my aim is to get back into the "normal" BMI range, reasonably fit, but not spending every free minute working on my body.

I shoot for 45 minutes of exercise per day, 5-6 days per week, and concentrate on sticking to a low-calorie diet that's probably a more skewed toward proteins and complex carbs than the "normal diet". It fits into life, without taking it over.

Tractortom 02-09-12 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedC (Post 13830372)
It took me three years to figure out I can't ride faster than I can eat. :( I finally started tracking what I eat and the weight is coming down. I lost about 40 lbs the first year I was riding but I added 20 back since last May even though I'm riding more than ever.

Red, you are the last guy I expected to see on this board. I know I fit well on here at 250lbs, but you never looked that heavy to me. Yeah, you're a big guy, but most times I still can't keep up with you when we ride. It's better now that I have the Bacchetta, compared to the Catrike, but still you challenge me.

Tractor Tom in Okeechobee

bassjones 02-09-12 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GettinMyLanceOn (Post 13830760)
I had no idea. You would think they'd be nuts with the word nut in them?

Corn isn't a vegetable either... It's a grain.

iforgotmename 02-09-12 05:03 PM

I have found the same thing with nuts, when I stop eating them I usually gain weight. I assume that supplying your body with healthy fats encourages it to burn the stored fats. If you have a steady supply no need to hoard.

Seve 02-09-12 05:43 PM

I think GettinMyLanceOn has a lot of good things going on there.

Although, I don't understand what is meant by "eat until you are satisfied" ?
People are sated with food well in advance (up to 20 minutes) before the stomach communicates that to the brain. If one keeps eating until that point, they are consuming more calories than needed / over eating.

I suspect a lot of people don't have the time to devote to intensive exercise and physical activities which poses another challenge.

I have always thought that a great place to start was with published Federal guidelines (same for most countries).
Dietary Guidelines for Americans
http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/Default.asp
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
http://health.gov/paguidelines/

GettinMyLanceOn 02-09-12 06:24 PM

Me in bold.

Quote:

Originally Posted by bassjones (Post 13831418)
Corn isn't a vegetable either... It's a grain.

Well, that much I knew. I feel like I am pretty knowledgeable when it comes to nutrition, which is why the peanut thing came as a surprise.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Seve (Post 13831975)
I think GettinMyLanceOn has a lot of good things going on there.

Although, I don't understand what is meant by "eat until you are satisfied" ?
People are sated with food well in advance (up to 20 minutes) before the stomach communicates that to the brain. If one keeps eating until that point, they are consuming more calories than needed / over eating.

For me, I just eat until my stomach is happy. I find that when I am consistent with my exercising as described in my original post, that my appetite is controlled. If I don't stay active, I tend to eat constantly. When I'm more active, I REALLY depend on whey protein to get enough protein in me since I'm just not as hungry.

I suspect a lot of people don't have the time to devote to intensive exercise and physical activities which poses another challenge.

This is the number one excuse I hear people say, but I don't understand why people can't devote one hour of their day to exercise. If you want to change your body, you'll make the time.

I have always thought that a great place to start was with published Federal guidelines (same for most countries).
Dietary Guidelines for Americans
http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/Default.asp
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
http://health.gov/paguidelines/

Forgive me if I don't trust the government on nutrition, let alone much else.



Quote:

Originally Posted by iforgotmename (Post 13831809)
I have found the same thing with nuts, when I stop eating them I usually gain weight. I assume that supplying your body with healthy fats encourages it to burn the stored fats. If you have a steady supply no need to hoard.

This makes sense. It's as if your body decides to burn fat instead of carbohydrates for energy, thus keeping your muscles loaded with glycogen and keeping you energized?



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