Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-21-12, 07:08 PM   #1
Dec1st
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Dec1st's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Saskatchewan
Bikes: 1972ish Ralegh Superbe step through in green, 1983 Nishiki International diamond frame in black with gold pinstriping
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Becoming Athena

I'm 35 years old. I have a three year old daughter. I have just been told by my doc (in a very nice way) that I could stand to lose 20 lbs. OK, 20 - 30 lbs. I'm under the 200lb mark, but I'm also short (5'3). I never really thought of myself as an Athena cyclist. I have always just biked as alternate transportation.

Any tips on how to transition to biking for fitness/weight loss?
Dec1st is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-12, 11:00 PM   #2
jimnolimit
attacking the streets!
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes: Jamis Coda Elite
Posts: 249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
the most important thing in the weight loss/get healthier equation is wanting to make the change.

my personal philosophy on weight loss/lifestyle change is:

1. do an audit of everything you eat and when you eat it for one week. this will help you to make the dietary corrections necessary to achieve your goal.
2. start off small and work your way up. there is no need to over exercise and derail yourself as you start your journey.
3. take your time and set reasonable goals. you didn't gain your weight over night, so don't expect to lose it over night.
4. treat weight loss as a life style change not a short term diet.
5. little things add up. this goes for both positive and negative things. constant snacking on junk food will help you gain weight (this is where the audit helps). constant little bits of exercise will help you lose it.
6. try to generally be more active. this includes walking more and moving more throughout the day.
7. scales are useful tools but they can drive you crazy if you let them. no matter how many times a week i jump on a scale, there is only one day a week that i "officially weigh-in". my "official weigh-ins are the only ones that count. i also weigh in under the same conditions every time, either saturday or sunday morning, in my underwear, after i go to the bathroom.
8. stay away from soda, both diet and regular (seltzer doesn't count as soda). even though diet soda has no calories, it's really sweet and it will keep your taste for sugary foods.

if exercise is a "chore" you will find reasons to not workout, if it's fun you will fit it into your schedule more often. i love biking and i make sure my rides are fun.

good luck on your journey.
jimnolimit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-12, 11:53 PM   #3
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Got a long way to go baby. I believe the (female) Athena mark is 145 (?, around there). The (male) Clyde is 200+ lbs.
Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 04:52 AM   #4
jethro56 
Watching and waiting.
 
jethro56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mattoon,Ill
Bikes: Trek 7300 Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
Posts: 2,019
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
I made fitness a habit by limiting myself to treadmill walking 20 minutes/day 3 times a week for 6 months. After awhile it was something I looked forward to. I was learning discipline that I carried on to the real way to lose weight... Calorie reduction. I suggest a target of a pound a week or a 500 Calorie/day deficit. No fast foods, no sweets.

Last edited by jethro56; 02-22-12 at 05:23 AM.
jethro56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 07:46 AM   #5
goldfinch 
Senior Member
 
goldfinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minnesota/Arizona and between
Bikes: Trek Madone 4.7 WSD, 1969 Schwinn Collegiate, Surly Long Haul Trucker, Terry Classic, Gary Fisher Marlin, Litespeed Ocoee
Posts: 3,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Lucky or unlucky for us women, we don't have to meet the 200 pound "rule" to be an Athena Instead, it is a 140 pound [EDIT:150 pounds] cut off. I'm short. At one time I met the Athena weight.

Exercise alone is not a good recipe for weight loss. Exercise can make people hungry and often people will eat as much or more calories that they are burning in their new exercise program. Or, they exercise and then they reward themselves with food. Plus, it takes a lot of exercise to burn off 500 calories in a day. You can find calculators to figure out roughly how many calories you burn at your current weight, with a rough judge of activity levels here: http://www.caloriesperhour.com/index_burn.php

How fit are you? How much do you bike now? When I was starting people suggested increasing my mileage about 10% a week. How do you use the bike as alternative transportation? Do you have a trailer for your daughter so that you could haul her around on adventures with you? Jethro says make it a habit. Jimno says make it fun. This is invaluable advice.

Last edited by goldfinch; 02-25-12 at 03:37 PM.
goldfinch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 12:41 PM   #6
Myosmith
Lover of Old Chrome Moly
 
Myosmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NW Minnesota
Bikes:
Posts: 2,548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Try riding intervals. Warm up, ride hard for a mile, cruise for a mile, repeat. This is an extremely simplified version and there are dozens of variations of intervals and intensities. Intervals are great for building strength and stamina as well as losing weight. Start by doing 2-3 intervals followed by a cool-down at a comfortable pace. As you improve, try shortening the intervals, increasing the intensity and number of intervals. If you get to the point you want to go hardcore, look up The Tabata Method.
Myosmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 02:47 PM   #7
CommuteCommando
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium
Posts: 3,010
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dec1st View Post
. . . I have always just biked as alternate transportation.

Any tips on how to transition to biking for fitness/weight loss?
First, keep biking as alternate transportation. I have been commuting by commuter rail and bike for over five years. The bike portion was only two miles for the first four years. Now with a new job in the last year, the commute is five miles each way, and I decided to get serious.

1. Get a good bike for commuting, and I suspect you have one already. I don't know how flat or hilly Saskatchewan is. A one speed bike may be appropriate, but I recommend gears, especially if there are hills.

2. Get a decent "weekend bike"; road or mountain is up to you. Mine is a road bike.

3. When you have extra time, take the long way home from work, as a workout. I sometimes "race the train" to the next stop, or two, down the line. This is up to twenty miles.
CommuteCommando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 03:18 PM   #8
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 13,713
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dec1st View Post
Any tips on how to transition to biking for fitness/weight loss?
Yep. Forget the idea, and bike for fun instead. Have so much fun that you don't like ending your rides. The rest will take care of itself.
Seattle Forrest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 04:19 PM   #9
Seve
Senior Member
 
Seve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: The GTA, Ontario, Canada
Bikes: 2009 Rocky Mountain RC30 D
Posts: 737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dec1st View Post
I'm 35 years old. I have a three year old daughter. I have just been told by my doc (in a very nice way) that I could stand to lose 20 lbs. OK, 20 - 30 lbs. I'm under the 200lb mark, but I'm also short (5'3). I never really thought of myself as an Athena cyclist. I have always just biked as alternate transportation.

Any tips on how to transition to biking for fitness/weight loss?
One of the best things you can do undertake some advanced planning. This is an excellent resource for that. My Healthy Weight Action Plan™ by the Heart and Stroke foundation.
https://www.heartandstroke.ca/hwplan.asp?media=hw_ This will flesh out many of the points others have touched upon and provide you with a lot of helpful information and tools.

Good Luck
Seve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-12, 11:08 PM   #10
nkfrench 
Senior Member
 
nkfrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Bikes: 2006 Specialized Ruby Pro aka "Rhubarb" / and a backup road bike
Posts: 1,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sub 140 to get out of the Athena club ? I'm only 5'6" but ... yikes. I thought it was 150.

Cycling as alternative transportation is wonderful.

Anyhow, my advice is to first focus is on fitness. Pounds are important, just not as much as fitness.

Despite my weight/bmi/body fat, my doc is pleased with recent blood test results, blood pressure, etc.
My HRM shows that I can perform at a high level of maximum for a while, then heartrate drops quickly at rest.

What works for me: change the mindset that food is recreation (it is fuel). After a good hard workout you may have more of an appetite for good food choices.
Find people that have similar priorities (bike club?) and hang out with them instead of people who don't have healthy lifestyles. You can be a great role model for your family and others in your life.
I have a competitive streak in me so I make goals where I compete with myself to be the best cycling nkfrench I can be.
Assess what is important in your life and do some house-cleaning. What brings you joy?
If you do something just because you think you "should" be doing it, quit and use the time/money towards things that benefit your health.
nkfrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 01:30 AM   #11
cmcgarvey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
Try riding intervals. Warm up, ride hard for a mile, cruise for a mile, repeat. This is an extremely simplified version and there are dozens of variations of intervals and intensities. Intervals are great for building strength and stamina as well as losing weight. Start by doing 2-3 intervals followed by a cool-down at a comfortable pace. As you improve, try shortening the intervals, increasing the intensity and number of intervals. If you get to the point you want to go hardcore, look up The Tabata Method.
THIS! Oh man, when I started training brazilian jiu jitsu I weighed 240 and was doing HIIT training every other day and when I would roll with the younger, much fitter looking people, I out lasted them every round. Interval training can do wonders for your stamina.

But you really need to learn a lot about your body. The best is to push yourself to about 80% MHR. Anything beyond that for extended work outs will do a lot more harm to you then benefit. I learned this the hard way. Pushed myself way too far one time and got really lite headed and was shaking really bad for about 10 minutes. Also for indoor interval training its better to either have at home equipment or go to a more "meat head" friendly gym, or during off hours at a basic gym like 24 hour fitness.
cmcgarvey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 07:58 AM   #12
Dec1st
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Dec1st's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Saskatchewan
Bikes: 1972ish Ralegh Superbe step through in green, 1983 Nishiki International diamond frame in black with gold pinstriping
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
How fit are you? How much do you bike now? When I was starting people suggested increasing my mileage about 10% a week. How do you use the bike as alternative transportation? Do you have a trailer for your daughter so that you could haul her around on adventures with you? Jethro says make it a habit. Jimno says make it fun. This is invaluable advice.
That's always a tough question. In the spring, summer and fall, I cancel the plates on the car and bike EVERYWHERE. I do have a trailer and take my daughter with me. In the winter time, I don't bike much at all. I might be keeping warm on the bike, but my daughter in the trailer isn't. Plus, I'm north enough that they don't really bother keeping the side streets clean, they just expect people to know how to drive in the snow. Doesn't really work on a bike with a trailer.

In a few weeks, I'll be back to buying groceries for five on my bike. Right now, my exercise is water walking and open gym time running with a preschooler three or four times a week. (between 60-90 minutes each time). I don't feel out of shape.
Dec1st is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 08:11 AM   #13
Dec1st
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Dec1st's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Saskatchewan
Bikes: 1972ish Ralegh Superbe step through in green, 1983 Nishiki International diamond frame in black with gold pinstriping
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkfrench View Post
Sub 140 to get out of the Athena club ? I'm only 5'6" but ... yikes. I thought it was 150.

Despite my weight/bmi/body fat, my doc is pleased with recent blood test results, blood pressure, etc.
My HRM shows that I can perform at a high level of maximum for a while, then heartrate drops quickly at rest.
What brings you joy?
If you do something just because you think you "should" be doing it, quit and use the time/money towards things that benefit your health.
I thought it was 150 too
MY BMI has me overweight, but not obese. I had been at a stable weight for 15 years before I had my daughter and now I'm about 35lbs heavier. I raised the subject with my doc because I wanted to lose a couple of pounds and found out that she would like to see me be a lot closer to my starting weight than I would have guessed.

Biking brings me joy. If I have to "exercise more" I want it to be on a bike.

However, my road bike still needs to be adjusted more (or maybe replaced) and my other bike(s) is a vintage Raleigh.
Dec1st is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 08:45 AM   #14
CommuteCommando
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium
Posts: 3,010
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkfrench View Post

What works for me: change the mindset that food is recreation (it is fuel).
I agree with one caveat. Food as recreation is o.k. if a big part of the fun is in the preparation. Learning to cook well, and challenging yourself to make it tasty and healthy is something I enjoy doing.

The bike club is a good idea, especially if there are several in your area to choose from. Look first at how fast the club rides are and go with one whose typical pace you are comfortable with. An interesting psychological aspect I have heard of, and then experienced for myself, is that you will comfortably maintain a higher pace riding with a group, than you will solo.

I ride with two clubs. One, at the work side of my commute, does rides with fewer hills, but getting there is not always convenient. The other is very local, but their rides can be very challenging hill wise. Where I live is quite hilly.

Last edited by CommuteCommando; 02-23-12 at 08:48 AM. Reason: added thoughts
CommuteCommando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 09:07 AM   #15
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,031
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Using the bike to burn alot more calories is tough because it takes time in the saddle and sustained effort. You may not have that time. If you do, regular 3 hr moderate rides will do wonders, but relying on one exercise alone is defeating in the long run.

Recall, a bike is a very efficient machine; you are using what translates to walking power to cruise 10-15mph, it's not a killer workout unless you push the intensity dramatically - which probably means time.

If you have access to a spin class, that 45 minutes will get you partway there, consider it your structured interval training without stop lights. I suggest you mix it up with a run or fast walk. 2 spins classes + 2 runs or fast walks a week...I think you'll see the pounds fall off assuming you control your intake.

Last edited by FrenchFit; 02-23-12 at 09:12 AM.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-12, 12:17 PM   #16
cyclokitty 
Not safe for work
 
cyclokitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Bikes: KHS Town and Country 100 & Jamis Durango Femme 1.0
Posts: 2,115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ride as much as possible and add more challenging terrain whenever you can. Enjoy the ride!

I find the riding part easy because it's so enjoyable but the diet change part I find tougher. But what works for me is lots of veggies, plenty of fruit, leaner cuts of meat and whole grains.
__________________

cyclokitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-12, 02:31 AM   #17
jimnolimit
attacking the streets!
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes: Jamis Coda Elite
Posts: 249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i forgot to add in my post above, i recommend also adding weight training to your routine. light weight/high reps will burn calories and tone your body.

p.s. IMO, that BMI scale is a general guide, not an end all be all.

Last edited by jimnolimit; 02-24-12 at 03:00 AM.
jimnolimit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-12, 02:45 AM   #18
jimnolimit
attacking the streets!
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes: Jamis Coda Elite
Posts: 249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
Using the bike to burn alot more calories is tough because it takes time in the saddle and sustained effort. You may not have that time. If you do, regular 3 hr moderate rides will do wonders, but relying on one exercise alone is defeating in the long run.

Recall, a bike is a very efficient machine; you are using what translates to walking power to cruise 10-15mph, it's not a killer workout unless you push the intensity dramatically - which probably means time.

If you have access to a spin class, that 45 minutes will get you partway there, consider it your structured interval training without stop lights. I suggest you mix it up with a run or fast walk. 2 spins classes + 2 runs or fast walks a week...I think you'll see the pounds fall off assuming you control your intake.
that's why i don't totally rely on biking for all of my exercise. i walk around and move a lot throughout the day, weight train regularly and bike (weather permitting). a few times a week i'll throw an extra 15 minutes of cardio into my day at the gym (now that it's too cold for biking), even 3 times a week adds up to 45 minutes of extra cardio at the end of the week.

im a big fan of multiple small-medium cardio workouts, than just a couple of long cardio workouts. at the end of the week the calorie burn will be about the same but your body won't be as worn and you won't have to dedicate several hours to cardio. also, buy spreading my workouts more throughout the week, i spend less time just sitting around.

p.s. i don't run because it puts too much wear and tear on your joints.
jimnolimit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-12, 11:51 AM   #19
Pamestique 
Shredding Grandma!
 
Pamestique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: So Cal
Bikes: I don't own any bikes
Posts: 4,797
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dec1st View Post
I thought it was 150 too
.
Depending on the discipline the athena weight category is 140 - 150 and in some instance 175... just for clarification.

For guys its 200+...

The key is consistancy... doesn't matter if you ride alone, with a club, at night, during the morning, weekends... you just need to maintain a schedule and stay on it. Sometimes its best to fit in other sports such as walking or hiking, swimming etc. if you find cycling too difficult to maintain. Distance is not that important either, at least in the beginning... try to maintain at least an hour of steady pedaling in teh beginning. As that hour shortens, add intensity and climbing to keep the time at an hour. Eventually the hours will stretch out to 1 1/2, 2, 3+... just stick with it, even at a recreational pace...
__________________
______________________________________________________________

Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

Last edited by Pamestique; 02-24-12 at 11:56 AM.
Pamestique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-12, 12:32 PM   #20
freighttraininguphill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Northern California
Bikes:
Posts: 2,642
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
I believe the (female) Athena mark is 145 (?, around there).
From Tom Stormcrowe's stickied thread here: "Why an Athena? Look at Greek art, and the idealized form. The Greek culture portrayed the Goddess Athena as, well......statuesque. To be an Athena, you are not going to be a skinny little stick girl. Athena was the Patroness Goddess of Athens, and was not only the goddess of the gift of wisdom, she was a warrior Goddess, portrayed as a large, well muscled, strong and athletic woman that embodies the ideals of wisdom, knowledge, beauty, and strength. This term also comes from the Tri world, and is given to women over 150 pounds and/or 5'10"."

Hopefully this will put some minds at ease around here. If the cutoff was 145 or 140, I probably would have never left Athena territory last summer.

I don't have anything else useful to add, as everyone else has covered that already.
freighttraininguphill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-12, 03:34 PM   #21
goldfinch 
Senior Member
 
goldfinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minnesota/Arizona and between
Bikes: Trek Madone 4.7 WSD, 1969 Schwinn Collegiate, Surly Long Haul Trucker, Terry Classic, Gary Fisher Marlin, Litespeed Ocoee
Posts: 3,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by freighttraininguphill View Post
From Tom Stormcrowe's stickied thread here: "Why an Athena? Look at Greek art, and the idealized form. The Greek culture portrayed the Goddess Athena as, well......statuesque. To be an Athena, you are not going to be a skinny little stick girl. Athena was the Patroness Goddess of Athens, and was not only the goddess of the gift of wisdom, she was a warrior Goddess, portrayed as a large, well muscled, strong and athletic woman that embodies the ideals of wisdom, knowledge, beauty, and strength. This term also comes from the Tri world, and is given to women over 150 pounds and/or 5'10"."

Hopefully this will put some minds at ease around here. If the cutoff was 145 or 140, I probably would have never left Athena territory last summer.

I don't have anything else useful to add, as everyone else has covered that already.
Oops! I had inadvertently lowered the weight limit. Either way, I was over Athena weight. Sorry all!

There really can be two kinds of Clydes and Athenas. The person who just is too fat, whatever their weight. Then there is also the "large, well muscled, strong" person who may weight quite a bit but not be fat. So, you may have some who never leave the weight category but are not overweight.

Last edited by goldfinch; 02-26-12 at 03:56 PM.
goldfinch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-12, 09:13 PM   #22
nkfrench 
Senior Member
 
nkfrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Bikes: 2006 Specialized Ruby Pro aka "Rhubarb" / and a backup road bike
Posts: 1,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
oh thank goodness its 150, that's more realistic and long-term sustainable.
Not fooling myself that I am carrying too much body fat *but* I will never be a stick girl.
I think I have been sub-140 for one day in my adult life.
At that time I was bench-pressing 145# freeweights (180# machines) etc.
Still have the 11C shoes and bone density tests agree I have a large frame.

Next question: There are Super Clydes and Uber-Clydes. Are there similar Athena sub-categories?
Or is that a "Let's Just Not Go There" decision by some wise people.
nkfrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-12, 10:00 PM   #23
tergal
Senior Member
 
tergal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Logan, QLD ,Australia
Bikes: Trek 4300
Posts: 790
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommuteCommando View Post
First, keep biking as alternate transportation. I have been commuting by commuter rail and bike for over five years. The bike portion was only two miles for the first four years. Now with a new job in the last year, the commute is five miles each way, and I decided to get serious.

1. Get a good bike for commuting, and I suspect you have one already. I don't know how flat or hilly Saskatchewan is. A one speed bike may be appropriate, but I recommend gears, especially if there are hills.

2. Get a decent "weekend bike"; road or mountain is up to you. Mine is a road bike.

3. When you have extra time, take the long way home from work, as a workout. I sometimes "race the train" to the next stop, or two, down the line. This is up to twenty miles.
i would like to post something useful but after reading the above post all i can think of was,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G_L9tXEwmc

First laugh in a very long week/weeks thank you
tergal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-12, 09:09 AM   #24
tony_merlino
Senior Member
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Bikes:
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
Oops! I had inadvertently lowered the weight limit. Either way, I was over Athena weight. Sorry all!

There really can be two kinds of Clydes and Athenas. The person who just is too fat, whatever their weight. Then there is also the "large, well muscled, strong" person who may weight quite a bit but not be fat. So, you may have some who never leave the weight category but are not overweight.
I've always choked a little on the Clydesdale name when applied to me. A Clydesdale is a big, strong horse. I think I'm more of a Bacchus, working on being an Apollo.
tony_merlino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-12, 10:02 AM   #25
CommuteCommando
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium
Posts: 3,010
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post

Recall, a bike is a very efficient machine; you are using what translates to walking power to cruise 10-15mph, it's not a killer workout unless you push the intensity dramatically - which probably means time.
Yes. At the job I had when I started commuting by bike. the ride was only two miles, and was not really a workout, other than making me more tolerant of a bike saddle. Walking that two miles was a better workout, and I sometimes did it.

The interesting thing I found, was that if you ride 60 min at 10 mph (roughly comparable to a 3mph walk), you will burn about the same calories as riding 40 min at 15 mph. You will cover the same distance. For this reason I figure my bike workout based on miles ridden, and elevation gained. Five miles is the minimum that I would call a workout, and is the length of my current commute. Ten is better, and I try to do at least twenty on a weekend ride.

As for the Clyde/'Thena label. There is fat and flabby, and there is fat and fit, then there is just big. To me, any one who has transcended the flabby, or is seriously working on it, qualifies. I am down sixty from where I started.
CommuteCommando is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:53 AM.