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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-01-12, 05:45 PM   #1
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My Madone has ruined me.

It was way too windy to ride yesterday so I spent some time tuning up my Madone. I know better than do do this in front of my 7300.(whiner) Anyway after it (the 7300) kept sobbing and acting out I finally told it "Alright already I'll put the new seatpost in and ride you tomorrow."

So off I go on an 18 mile slow cruise. Stopping every few miles to dial in the seatpost. Riding home with a gentle breeze I'm getting sore. My back hurts. My butt's getting sore. My neck feels stiff. Finally my right leg is bordering on cramping up.

I rode my madone over 200 miles in Florida in a little over 3 days and felt great. I need to sell the 7300 and get something else that has room for 35 ish tires, fenders and a rack. It just isn't a fun bike anymore.

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Old 03-01-12, 06:01 PM   #2
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I don't get it. You rode the Madone and felt great but want to sell it? Or is your writing unclear?
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Old 03-01-12, 06:06 PM   #3
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I don't get it. You rode the Madone and felt great but want to sell it? Or is your writing unclear?
My bad. Fixed. Thanks Beanz.
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Old 03-01-12, 06:11 PM   #4
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Hey Jethro, can you give a ride report on Florida? Tell us about the trail you did. How about the roads? I am thinking of doing Florida next year.

Oddly, I have ridden my hybrid many more miles than my Madone this winter. Too many thorns, too many flat tires, and some really rough roads and trails. I guess I am lucky, I love both bikes.
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Old 03-01-12, 06:21 PM   #5
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My bad. Fixed. Thanks Beanz.
Ah cool! Had me there for a minute, thought I was losing my mind.

But ain't it a much better more efficient bike lets say, more than a cruiser? I've had other posters claim that there should be no difference between riding a cruiser and a nice roadie. Funny, they even debated that a cruiser should be just as nice on the climbs.

But I see you've experienced and enjoyed the ride of a good bike!

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Old 03-01-12, 06:32 PM   #6
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http://www.traillink.com/trail/withl...ate-trail.aspx is where I went and is a 46 mile 12' wide asphalt rail trail. There's only one crossing of a busy street about 8 miles north of Inverness Florida. It might as well be the Trike Capital of the world. I stayed at the Central Motel about 100' off the trail and while it's older it's clean and was like $52/night taxes and all. The trail is flat and inhabited by friendly people. I went down by myself and found ample conversation. Lots of farmers. The trail is well maintained and patrolled by the Citris County Sheriffs who were friendly as well. I did crash in the rain but I really can't blame anyone and 3 guys stopped to help me. I'll be going back next year. If fact if I had not sprained my thumb I might still be there.
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Old 03-01-12, 10:31 PM   #7
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Fast road bikes are so temperamental. They get all jealous and sob if they find out you rode a stationary spin bike at the gym. They whine if you don't clean/lube them. They get all moody and depressed during the winter. They nag at you if they find you trying to sleep late on a nice summer morning. They love going fast but pitch a tantrum if you use the brakes to curb speed on a nice downhill. Then the way they trash talk with the other bikes... embarassing. Make sure you monitor your email in case your bike gets online and subscribes to bike magazines "just to read the articles" or tries to buy airline tickets to France to watch the Tour.

If you have more than one bike and one is a fast road bike, the taunting and bickering between them can be incredible.

The old bikes are much easier to get along with. They are just grateful if you ride 'em once in a while and let them shoot the BS with their bike friends.
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Old 03-02-12, 07:21 AM   #8
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So I guess I know which one you'll be on the next time we ride together.
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Old 03-02-12, 07:27 AM   #9
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Fast road bikes are so temperamental. They get all jealous and sob if they find out you rode a stationary spin bike at the gym. They whine if you don't clean/lube them. They get all moody and depressed during the winter. They nag at you if they find you trying to sleep late on a nice summer morning. They love going fast but pitch a tantrum if you use the brakes to curb speed on a nice downhill. Then the way they trash talk with the other bikes... embarassing. Make sure you monitor your email in case your bike gets online and subscribes to bike magazines "just to read the articles" or tries to buy airline tickets to France to watch the Tour.

If you have more than one bike and one is a fast road bike, the taunting and bickering between them can be incredible.

The old bikes are much easier to get along with. They are just grateful if you ride 'em once in a while and let them shoot the BS with their bike friends.
Heck, my bike Roark has his own Facebook account. It seems all he does is post about how I never ride him and how fat I am.
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Old 03-02-12, 09:48 AM   #10
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So is your experience a counter-argument to all those people who claim there's no point in getting a light(er) bike if you yourself could stand to lose weight? I realize that Madone has a lot going for it beyond simply being lighter...
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Old 03-02-12, 10:35 AM   #11
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So is your experience a counter-argument to all those people who claim there's no point in getting a light(er) bike if you yourself could stand to lose weight? I realize that Madone has a lot going for it beyond simply being lighter...
I don't presume to speak for our friend Jethro, but I'd say if you're the least bit interested in performance biking, you should get the lightest bike you can afford. I've been fat on cheap, heavy bikes and fat on nice, light bikes, and fat on nice, light bikes is better.
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Old 03-02-12, 10:46 AM   #12
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Oh, I agree with you 100% but those discussions tend to go sideways into "weight weenie" accusations, even though (IMO) there's a real and noticeable benefit to improved equipment.
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Old 03-02-12, 11:15 AM   #13
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I don't presume to speak for our friend Jethro, but I'd say if you're the least bit interested in performance biking, you should get the lightest bike you can afford. I've been fat on cheap, heavy bikes and fat on nice, light bikes, and fat on nice, light bikes is better.
"and fat on nice, light bikes is better"

and if it's better you tend to do it more often thus the potential to lose more weight It's the dog chasin' his arse deal.
There is also the axiom of 'n+1' that we all *must* abide by.

I myself would like to get rid of my Tarpon but I jump on that when it's nasty out or I want to huff and puff up a climb on a 34# bike
Perhaps I'll add a CX type bike to my stable and then be able to rid myself of the Tarpon
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Old 03-02-12, 11:20 AM   #14
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I don't think its so.much the weight of a nicer bike, eg it being lighter, its just nicer, ya know.....
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Old 03-02-12, 11:47 AM   #15
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I guess my point is that my body has so adapted to the 4.5 Madone that the upright, so called "comfort" fit of a hybrid bike is no longer comfortable. I thought I'd be able to use the Hybrid on non paved trails similar to the GAP in PA & MD. My prejudices tell me a 25mm tire is a poor choice for Crushed limestone trails. I tend to believe a 35 is a better/safer choice. Add in the fact that the Madone has 24 spoke wheels and adding a rack and fenders is problematic. All this leads me to thinking more and more about a cyclocross/light touring addition to the stable.

I've been pouring over the charts comparing the geo's of touring versus cyclocross bikes and understand the difference from an object viewpoint. It's the subjective that eludes me. Central Illinois appears to be a barren area for these bikes which makes finding them in the right size difficult. (The Madone is a 60 cm)
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Old 03-02-12, 12:31 PM   #16
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Oh, I agree with you 100% but those discussions tend to go sideways into "weight weenie" accusations, even though (IMO) there's a real and noticeable benefit to improved equipment.
Weight weenie, pixel peeper ... all hobbies have some term to mildly insult some of the people who get into them.
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Old 03-02-12, 12:36 PM   #17
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Fast road bikes are so temperamental. They get all jealous and sob if they find out you rode a stationary spin bike at the gym. They whine if you don't clean/lube them. They get all moody and depressed during the winter. They nag at you if they find you trying to sleep late on a nice summer morning. They love going fast but pitch a tantrum if you use the brakes to curb speed on a nice downhill. Then the way they trash talk with the other bikes... embarassing. Make sure you monitor your email in case your bike gets online and subscribes to bike magazines "just to read the articles" or tries to buy airline tickets to France to watch the Tour.

If you have more than one bike and one is a fast road bike, the taunting and bickering between them can be incredible.

The old bikes are much easier to get along with. They are just grateful if you ride 'em once in a while and let them shoot the BS with their bike friends.
Funny stuff. I say that because my road bike, while getting a lot of riding early in the winter, hasn't had much road bike weather as of late to ride in. So Sunday it was nice out and I decided to take it out for a short ride. Little did I know how short it was going to be.

A block and half from the house I have a flat rear tire. Thinking you dummy why didn't you check them before you left I walked it back home and filled it back up. Being the dummy I am instead of waiting to see if it was really a flat and not just low on air I hopped right back on and up the street I go only to make it the same block and half before it is flat again. I mumble dummy under my breath as I hoist it on my shoulder and walk it back home again. This time I take the time to remove the tube to find the problem. Hum small hole in the middle inside of the tub. Better look at the wheel and tire. Sure enough the tire is starting to split at the bead. Stupid road bike. Luckily I had bought a set of tires (Michelin Pro 3 Race) online on sale last fall for 60 bucks for the pair so I guess it could have been worse. Since it was being such a brat I only road it up the block just to make sure all was Ok and said screw it for the day. I did ride it to work Monday though just to shut it up.

Now the pretty little Panama Blue Hybrid is looking at me going hey what about me? I've set longer then the road bike has! I must admit I've been neglecting it since the road bike and new MTB came home with me lately.

Hummmmm... you know what? It's lunch time. I think I'll take the long route to the coffee shop on the little Panama Blue bike right now...

fasthair

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Old 03-02-12, 01:22 PM   #18
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So maybe Jethro56 needs to shed the 7300 other bikes,
and get something he does not have to travel to FLORIDA
to be able to enjoy riding this time of year in his home state?

Felt makes some real nice all Carbon cross bikes, but that leaves off the other desire
to kit it out for mudguards and racks and be practical.

take fit data off the Madone and hire a custom frame of metal like that , perhaps?

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Old 03-02-12, 01:44 PM   #19
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My prejudices tell me a 25mm tire is a poor choice for Crushed limestone trails.
Your prejudices are right. I tried it once on the Elroy-Sparta trail, 30 years ago, and it was a mistake.

Of course, I was also sporting an overloaded handlebar bag, which didn't help the handling any.
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Old 03-02-12, 05:42 PM   #20
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I've been to Devils Lake many times. Kinda a neat area geologically speaking.
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Old 03-03-12, 09:23 AM   #21
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My prejudices tell me a 25mm tire is a poor choice for Crushed limestone trails. I tend to believe a 35 is a better/safer choice. (The Madone is a 60 cm)
I had 28's with mild knobs on my single speed and it was actually quite nice on crushed limestone. I agree 35 is nicer than 25, but 28 and 32 are also viable options, IMHO.
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Old 03-03-12, 09:29 AM   #22
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I guess my point is that my body has so adapted to the 4.5 Madone that the upright, so called "comfort" fit of a hybrid bike is no longer comfortable. I thought I'd be able to use the Hybrid on non paved trails similar to the GAP in PA & MD. My prejudices tell me a 25mm tire is a poor choice for Crushed limestone trails. I tend to believe a 35 is a better/safer choice. Add in the fact that the Madone has 24 spoke wheels and adding a rack and fenders is problematic. All this leads me to thinking more and more about a cyclocross/light touring addition to the stable.

I've been pouring over the charts comparing the geo's of touring versus cyclocross bikes and understand the difference from an object viewpoint. It's the subjective that eludes me. Central Illinois appears to be a barren area for these bikes which makes finding them in the right size difficult. (The Madone is a 60 cm)
I've done many, many trails like the GAP on 32s. Even on the worst surfaces I've ever ridden - the C & O and the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike - a 32 was fine.
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Old 03-03-12, 09:42 AM   #23
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I know the feeling. I had a mountain bike I absolutely love and adored, but I finally had to let it go. Even though inside I loved it and had endless great memories of it, I found myself unable to comfortably ride it no matter what adjustments I did to it after I got my Long Haul Trucker. So I eventually sold it for next to nothing to a reader of my blog with a good purpose and need.

I miss it, but mainly miss the memories. And having a backup bike. Soon enough, though, soon enough.
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Old 03-03-12, 09:43 AM   #24
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I've done many, many trails like the GAP on 32s. Even on the worst surfaces I've ever ridden - the C & O and the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike - a 32 was fine.
I concur with Neil. I had a Trek FX with 32's and I rode many a gravel trail, and even gravel roads on slick Bontrager 32's. The latter were a little sketchy not due to the size, but the lack of tread. I've also used 37's and 35's - all were fantastic.
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Old 03-11-12, 08:57 PM   #25
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This bike is on the finalist list. http://salsacycles.com/bikes/casseroll/ Not thrilled about Tiagra triple but a total custom build with a 105 groupset and wheels is $600 more. Champaign cycle is quoting $1200 for the complete version.
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