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  1. #1
    Pain ?? What Pain !!
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    Who bought new wheels lately ??

    I'm looking for new wheels and tires and was wondering if anyone here has bought any lately and how they worked out. I was surprised last week when I compared the wheels on my old and new bike. The wheels (Mavic CXP22) on my new bike are heavier than the wheels (Alex DA-22) on my old bike. Besides I really don't like the wheel tire combo so I'm looking for something newer and lighter. The tires are Vittoria Zaffiro's, on which I had 3 flats last year. The old Michelin Carbon's were much more flat resistant. I also worry about spoke count. I weigh in at 205lbs and have broken spokes several times on the Alex rims. So far none on the Mavic. Thoughts ?? Thanks !!
    2010 Felt F75

  2. #2
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    At 205 lb you're sort of a mini-clyde. Subsequently, you have a lot of options available to you that some of us at 250+ can't really consider. Some many options in fact, that your really need to provide some details to help narrow down the options. Intended use? Training, racing, recreation, CC Touring? Budget? Etc.

    If being used for training, I think you'll find a lot of clydes not concerned about pushing 2,000+ grm wheels around. Recommendations for such will focus around rims like your CXP22's, CXP 33's, Velocity Deep V's, DT 585/RR1.2's, etc.

    If you're looking for event day wheels on a budget, you're going to hear about Mavic Ksyrium Elites. Someone will say they've had good luck on a pair Bontragers, even though we hear lighter riders complaining about some of their models. There will then be a discussion about whether you would be better served by factory low spoke count wheels or a pair of custom hand built 28/32h wheels.

    If money is no object and you just what to feel like you've got the best bike ever, some of the clyde rated Zipps or Enve's.

    One pair of wheels to go from training to events and do it all. Probably a pair of Open Pro's, velocity fusions or DT 465's, etc. 32h, laced 3X with 14/15 spokes.

    Touring, listen to someone other than me.

    Basically, if you're after weight savings, someone at your weight could go reasonably low (sub 1500gr) and it becomes a balance between your wallet and willingness to maintain or replace them.

    If you're after durability and not breaking spokes, 32 14/15 spokes 3X, is going to be more than adequate if built up by a knowledgable and good wheelsmith. Weight would then be determined by your choice of hub and rim. Back to what's the budget?

    For what its worth, I just order a pair of 32h DT 585 rims and Ultegra hubs to go with them. I'll build those up with 14/15 3X spokes and brass nipples. I expect them to be long lasting training wheels for myself at 250 lbs and riding 100-150 miles/week, though mostly hilly terrain.
    Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.

  3. #3
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    I got a pair of Easton EA 90 SL wheels about 2 years ago and they've been fantastic & stayed true. They're also pretty light despite having a 25mm or so cross section.

    I started using those wheels at 241 and despite having what should be a shocking low spoke count (24 in front, 28 in back), they've been very reliable.

    It doesn't surprise me that you broke spokes on a low-end, machine made wheel. Most people will tell you that a well-built, by hand wheel will be far more reliable and that requires somebody who knows how to get the proper spoke tension in each spoke while keeping the wheel true. Its a little bit of a black art but the results speak for themselves.

    If you're looking for new wheels I think Mavic Ksyiriums are available in a variety of price points and you can generally find them for less than an arm and a leg... Performance had the Equipes on closeout recently for 299, which is a great deal.

    Depends on your budget really... and how frantic you are to get new wheels. I'd wait for some kind of sale if I were you but it depends on your sense of urgency. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    At 235 I bought a Mavic Ksyrium Elite Wheelset from Performance (2009?) on clearance for $399.00. So far they have been a great upgrade from the Mavic Aksiums which came on the bike and had over 3500 miles on them. The Aksiums are still going strong on another bike. Unfortunately neither Performance nor Nashbar seem to have the Ksyrium on sale now.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Padley's Avatar
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    I'm 214 and just bought a set of November FSW23's with the SOB 28/32 build. Under $500 and at 1520g well under my stock Alex rims. Don't have them yet but have heard nothing but great things about them and November.

    www.novemberbicycles.com/fsw-23/
    First Bike - '05 Specialized Allez elite

  6. #6
    Senior Member metalheart44's Avatar
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    i'm about your size -- dt swiss 415 rims with 240s hubs with conti 4000s tires, 32 rear 28 front

  7. #7
    Pain ?? What Pain !!
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    Just ordered Mavic Ksyrium Equipe's from Nashbar on sale for $239.00/pr. and Michelin Krylion Carbon tires along with Michelin UltraLite tubes. At that price I couldn't resist. As I said above I've had good luck with Michelin Carbon's in the past. We'll see how it goes. Thanks for all the input !!
    2010 Felt F75

  8. #8
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    I got a pair of Boyd 38 mm carbon tubulars. I like them so far. Unfortunately, I haven't had as much chance to use them as I'd like, thanks to living in Seattle.

    I was a bit over the weight limit, so Coach Boyd custom built me a pair of wheels with 24/28 spokes, instead of 20/24 as normal. The spokes are CX Ray - oval shaped.





    Don't believe everything you think.

  9. #9
    Senior Member mtalinm's Avatar
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    Harris Cyclery built me a pair of 20" wheels for my folder using Sun Rhyno Lite rims. Some say they are indestructible. I suspect I'll give them a good workout on the Boston potholes
    Trek Domane 4.5 (commute/distance), Specialized Roubaix (climber), Xootr Swift (winter/travel), Trek Soho (around town)

  10. #10
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Forrest - how are you liking your wheels? They certainly look sharp and the weight seems to be consistent with regular light (not super light) aluminum wheelsets. Supposedly you don't really get any aero benefits till 50mm though? If that's the case, what's the point of 38? Stiffer? Look better?

  11. #11
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    The 38 mm rims are heavier but stronger than the 24 (?) mm ones. Mostly, it was the strength that attracted me to these. I'm using them as every (dry) day wheels, and didn't want anything too deep, to not be too susceptible to cross winds. Also, it was light weight I was after with these, which also leads me to shallower rims - and the 38s were the ones that were strong enough to hold me.

    The truth is, I've had a hard time figuring the aero thing out. I could babble some more, but I'll just say I think these are slightly more aerodynamic than my old (stock) wheels, but not terribly more so, more aero than MadFibers, and less so than Zipps.

    At the end of the day, I'm happy with them. Also, these are tubulars - I'm enjoying that. They feel great through corners!
    Don't believe everything you think.

  12. #12
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    When I got my Synapse last summer, I didn't trust the OEM Shimano wheels (RS10 or R510, I can't remember which is right), so I got a pair of Neuvation M28X Aero wheels for backup. I like them just fine, especially for the money. Turns out the Shimanos have been fine, too.
    Craig in Indy

  13. #13
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    Also, these are tubulars - I'm enjoying that. They feel great through corners!
    My experiences with tubulars is limited to the pair that came on my old Gitane TdF when I bought it in '84. They were Wolber Aspin rims, but I don't recall whose hubs they were.

    Tubulars did feel really great, but they required a whole different set of tire skills, and for me at least a whole different tire budget. I could never afford the nicely aged tires, so I had to buy relatively cheap Vittoria Nuovo Pros (in '85 they were about $20 each, compared to $50-$150 for the good ones). But cheap tires aren't aged like the expensive ones are, and the rubber is softer, making the tires pick up every last little bit of debris that could and would work its way through the casing to puncture the tube. I got really good at avoiding the garbage at the side of the road (when I could), and learning to clean the tires with the palm of my gloved hand while riding (when I couldn't). I never did bother to learn to open them up, patch the tube and sew them back together.

    I finally gave up the frustations of carrying whole spare tires and the mess of gluing, when I had to replace the wheels. I had a wrench friend build me a set of the new narrow high-pressure clinchers with Mavic rims and Campy hubs.
    Craig in Indy

  14. #14
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
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    really depends on how much you have to spend.. 200.00 there are a few choices - get into 400.00+ and you can have a nice custom wheelset built

  15. #15
    Senior Member gyozadude's Avatar
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    I've recently been riding a set of 32H 700c Velocity Fusion clinchers for last couple of weeks. Laced 3X to vintage 600 Ultegra 6400 tricolour hubs with 14g straight spokes. Fairly stiff and true after only about 150 miles of commuting and just one 50 miler group ride. Built them myself. Got the rims and hubs pretty darn cheap. Wheelsmith spokes. I'm running Michelin Dynamic sport 700x28c tires. It's not the lightest, but it seems to work okay for someone like me at 280 lbs. I'm looking for some 36H Fusions now and considering building with some double butted spokes. 480grams for the rim, as compared to 510grams for Mavic CXP22.

    Not as recent, but with about 1000 miles on them are some Alex DC19 700c 36H wheels that came on the single speed Nashbar Hounder I bought last year. Rims are pretty heavy. 530 grams for DC19s. But strong. I have broken a spoke or two on rear drive side with those stock rims w/ no name spokes early on. I replaced all 18 drive-side spokes with fresh stainless 14g spokes and so far so good for the last 6 months.
    Yes, I can roll my own potsticker skins!

  16. #16
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    Also, it was light weight I was after with these, which also leads me to shallower rims - and the 38s were the ones that were strong enough to hold me.
    Those Sapim CX-Ray spokes don't hurt, either! They're tough to beat on their durability. A lot of 'cross racers use them on lower count builds. If I end up going with a rebuild to sub-32h rims on my 'cross rig, I'm doing them up with CX-Ray spokes.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kragg View Post
    I'm looking for new wheels and tires and was wondering if anyone here has bought any lately and how they worked out.
    I've been riding a set of 32 hole 1996 Campagnolo Chorus hubs, DT 2.0/1.5 Revolution spokes except DT 2.0/1.8 Competition spokes rear drive hubs, alloy nipples, and either Reflex clinchers (didn't take long to put a flat spot in the rear even at 145 pounds; although the front made it about 13 years until after I grew to Clydestale dimensions although the brake track was worn so it was due for replacement anyways) or Open Pros since I built them in 1998 (I last changed a rear Open Pro when I crashed it around 2006). I eschewed bike computers for many years but used them for all but about 1200 of the 5209 miles since getting my bike computer in August 2010.

    I only true them to limp home after bending a rim and when replacing the rims (IOW I haven't touched my rear wheel for 6 years and the front went 13 years without seeing a spoke wrench).

    While I wouldn't recommend the Open Pros (they bend more easily than deeper and heavier rims and cracking problems have been reported in newer models) you can't go wrong with your choice of deeper commodity rim (DT, Mavic, Velocity, I don't like the shallow well in the middle of Kinlins or the variation in ERDs but some people like them), 32 butted spokes (fewer will work fine, but with 32 if you put a slight bend in a rim it often stays true enough for you to finish your ride with an open quick release) brass nipples (they'll tolerate short spokes or big rims and idiots who don't properly lubricate when building), and Shimano or Campagnolo cup and cone hubs with a competent wheel build (if you have patience, are literate, and slightly mechanically inclined you can do it yourself and guarantee it's done right).

    Once you wear out a brake track or crash a wheel you just move the spokes over to its replacement.

    With boutique wheels you can have problems getting replacement rims, may need to spend hundreds of dollars for the manufacturer's crash repair program, and will be out of action for a lot longer.

    Some time I'll get around to rebuilding my Powertap SL+ into a new wheel. I have a 32/28 hole set of Kinlin XR300s in shiny silver but was not happy with the first one I built into a wheel. Maybe Velocity rms with the new HALO reflective coating. DT Aerolites. Alloy nipples because I'm smart enough to measure ERD, buy the right length, lubricate with anti-seize, can still turn mine after over a decade, and reuse all but the few damaged in road-side tweaks when putting a new rim on.

    I was surprised last week when I compared the wheels on my old and new bike. The wheels (Mavic CXP22) on my new bike are heavier than the wheels (Alex DA-22) on my old bike.
    A full pound will slow you down 0.4% and let the chasing peleton gain 16 seconds an hour on you when you're racing off-the-front to an up-hill mountain stage finish.

    You will have 0.8% more kinetic energy at a given speed if that's where the rubber meets the road, but the total change to accelerate up to speed will be less because so much of your power is going into aerodynamic drag.

    In other words it's not interesting.

    I weigh in at 205lbs and have broken spokes several times on the Alex rims.
    That's most likely a bad wheel build but could also be cheap spokes.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 03-13-12 at 06:27 PM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    I got a set of campy Khamsin and Scirocco wheels last year and haven't had any problems with them at all. I was building up my bianchi and just wanted a cheaper set of wheels that would work with a 11 speed cassette. These have worked fine, and the cost was about $225.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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