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  1. #1
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    Bought a bike. What else do I need?

    Well, I finally bought a bike. Got a Giant Roam 1 (2011). I plan to pick up a lock (not sure what kind) and a bottle, but other than that I have no idea what else I need. Any essentials I should get?

  2. #2
    Fat Cyclist
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    • A quality U-lock and maybe a cable lock to lock your wheels as well.
    • Front and rear lights.
    • A water bottle cage if you don't have one.

    Those are the only things you will need. But there are a bunch of other goodies you could buy for your bike. Do you use this bike to commute? Or is it for fun/fitness?

    • Racks and bags to carry stuff.
    • A helmet.
    • Mirrors.
    • Bell/airzound
    • Reflective tape or vest
    • Bicycle computer

    Etc.
    “It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.” - Jiddu Krishnamurti

  3. #3
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    I got them to throw in the water bottle cage. I've been trying to decide between a Polar Insulated and a Camelback Podium. I don't really care for cold water so I figure the Podium would be fine.

    On the lock. Is there a reason to get he U-lock over a cable lock? It seems like the cable lock would be more secure because you could wind it through the wheels.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Seve's Avatar
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    The Podium water bottle is fine and IMHO a much better one to boot.

    The lock is a personal choice, I think Axiom was suggesting both a U-Lock and a cable lock?

    You will probably want to get a saddle bag, spare inner tube, air pump/co2 cartridge, patches, multi-tool and some tire levers.

    Nice bike, btw, so enjoy the ride

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube.

    Been riding consistently for 15 years. For 12-13 years I offered so many tubes to unfamiliar unprepared riders that it isn't funny. Last couple of years I decided I couldn't afford to support other riders any longer so if I see them walking with a flat, they can walk. I don't care how cute you are.

    Note: We ride where there are plenty of cyclists passing every few minutes so it's not like leaving a rider stranded in the woods.

  6. #6
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    IMO, before all whistles and bells, I'd make sure you have good rim strip in the wheels. Many times the stock rubber or plastic strip sucks. Shifts to the side allowing punctures and blow outs.

    Be sure it's this type of strip, adhesive surgical type strip. Velox is well know, but I have just as good luck with the Performance brand. Don't let the shop tell you the cheapo plastic junk is good enough.


    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...1604509_400941

  7. #7
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    Lots and lots of threads around on this...

    Helmet
    Gloves
    Shorts
    Small seat bag
    Multi-tool
    Spare tube(s)
    Patch kit
    Tire lever(s)
    Water bottle(s) & cage(s)
    Floor pump
    Frame pump
    CO2 carts if that's your bent

    As far as bottles go, I used a Polar for years and thought it was great, until the valve broke off in a spin class a few weeks ago and I replaced it with a Camelback Podium Chill. Much better valve and a lot better at keeping liquid cold, IMO.

    And as in all other pursuits, there are lots of other things you can get depending on your budget and desired level of bike-geekiness.
    Craig in Indy

  8. #8
    Senior Member tony_merlino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube.
    +1

    And 3 tire irons, a rag, a multi-tool that has the common sized Allen wrenches, hex wrenches and a screwdriver. Some zip ties can't hurt to throw in the bag.

    A lightweigh little saddle bag fits this all nicely.
    L'asino di Buridano...

  9. #9
    Senior Member jmccain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoe_24 View Post
    Bought a bike. What else do I need?
    You need to ride it. Lots. Have fun!

  10. #10
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    I think that it really depends on what kind of riding you will be doing on what to get first. I have to agree with the "Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube. Get a PUMP and a spare tube." comment, a tire lever set, patch kit, multitool, HELMET for sure but a lot of the other stuff I would kind of see how things went and decide what you need.

    Of course if you will be leaving the bike unattended a lock is needed but I have been riding since 2009 and have only needed to lock my bike one time, but thats mainly because I ride on rail trails and random single tracks mostly so.... with that said I do have a small cable lock that I carry in my pack just in case and its been sufficient thus far. water bottle? sure BUT I have a box of water bottles that I don't use right now because I find it more convenient to just shove a Powerade bottle in my cage, I do like I said have a ton of bottles but only one gets used and that is very rarely, I don't think a lot of thought needs to go into a water bottle really, have one but which one doesn't really matter IMHO, start over thinking stuff and you end up with tone of stuff that you don't use

    If you plan on riding at night lights will be needed but I wouldn't call them a necessity unless, well.... you are riding at night

    In my pack I have

    2 bandanas
    tire lever set
    hex key set
    cheapy bike tool (because it has a screw driver on it mainly)
    1 tube
    patch kit
    Leatherman multitool
    mini pump
    One red, one white Nite Ize spotlit (clipped to my pack for just in case)
    air pressure guage

    I have only needed a random hex key from my pack for a seat adjustment since I got back into riding BUT I consider myself VERY lucky for that and would never go on a ride without grabbing the pack. but I would recommend the items I mentioned in the first paragraph for starters and see what you need from there, a good floor pump to keep home is a great thing to have also, I usually check pressure before I leave on a ride and the floor pump is nice to have for that.

    Good luck with the new bike!
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  11. #11
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    In order of priority (bike bottle/cage are obvious, so I won't cover them):

    -Helmet
    -Pump, Patches, spare tube, Tire levers, Multi-tool all in a seat bag
    -I will second checking your rim strips. If they are rubber replace with Velox, anything else if they look OK, give them a shot, if you have issues, replace with Velox. All but my Sirrus (factory wheels) have Velox rim tape, never a single issue.
    -Strong legs

    That will get you rolling for now. Down the road (so to speak) you might find you want gloves, bike jersey/athletic shirt, bike shorts, Bike computer, and all kinds of other things. But the basics are listed above. I don't even have a multi-tool, and I need one. My canal path bike has allen wrenches in the seat bag, so I am covered there.

    Enjoy the bike! (oh, and Podium bottles are wonderful, they make them insulated too...)
    2012 Diamondback Podium 2 - Ready for spring! :D
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  12. #12
    Senior Member SuncoastChad's Avatar
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    +1. Ride. At first you'll probably be close to home so all the "gear" is not necessary. Probably just the water bottle, helmet (if inclined that way - I never leave home without it), gloves, and a smile on the face. Remember it's a journey and not a race!
    Before hitting "Enter" or "Send" ask yourself: Is this true? Is this kind? Is this NECESSARY?
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  13. #13
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    at least one lung and a heart.

  14. #14
    Senior Member tpelle's Avatar
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    After a couple of flats you will probably decide to upgrade your stock (cheap) tires and tubes to puncture resistant types. When you do so, take one of the old tires and cut a couple of sections a couple of inches long (cut the bead off of each side, too, as you only want the sidewall and tread area) and store in your seat bag with the rest of your flat-fixin' stuff. If you run over a piece of debris, such as a flattened tin can (this stuff always gets "swept" into the bike lanes), your tire will be cut and the tube will bulge out through the cut and explode. You can use the piece of tire to reinforce the cut area.

    I had to push a bike almost 10 miles in the hot sun - the last five after running out of water - because of a cut rear tire. Wish I had known of that trick then!
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  15. #15
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    I plan on picking up a pump first. I was looking at this pump http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER It seems good, but I'd rather have a pump that sits ontop/below the frame instead of to the side. Any suggestions. I'm afraid that it will get in the way being on the side.

  16. #16
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoe_24 View Post
    . I'm afraid that it will get in the way being on the side.
    It won't.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  17. #17
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    Would a larger pump be better? I notice that some mount to the top bar and are larger.

  18. #18
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoe_24 View Post
    Would a larger pump be better? I notice that some mount to the top bar and are larger.
    With frame pumps you can't always go by size as an indicator. My little Topeak Road Morph outperforms my old Zefal frame-fit pumps from years ago.

    You may want to pay attention to your tires' air needs when choosing. Some pumps are designed to move large amounts of air with each stroke, getting you to a relatively low pressure in a large tire more quickly, but then they get real hard to pump when you want high pressure. Others are designed to move relatively small volumes of air at high pressures, making it easier to fill skinny road tires, but leaving you pumping and pumping and pumping if you have a larger volume of air to move.
    Craig in Indy

  19. #19
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoe_24 View Post
    Well, I finally bought a bike. Got a Giant Roam 1 (2011). I plan to pick up a lock (not sure what kind) and a bottle, but other than that I have no idea what else I need. Any essentials I should get?
    My suggestions:

    Helmet - I never go out without mine.
    Bottle cage + bottle (maybe x2, depending on how far you're expecting to ride and in what conditions)
    Basic toolkit (a multitool will work just fine)
    Tyre levers, spare inner tube or puncture patch kit, pump (listed on one line as if you don't have them all the ones you do have are useless in isolation)
    Saddle bag (useful for storing the above, as well as some food for longer rides)
    Lights (if there's any chance you'll be out after dark)

    Other stuff that can be useful but isn't necessary:

    Some form of eyewear to keep bugs out of your eyes
    Cycling computer / GPS
    Additional storage (rack and panniers don't leave your back sweaty like a backpack does)

    Then over time you'll probably want to add things like cycling clothing - shorts, jerseys, shoes etc.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  20. #20
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Oh yes, before you load up on tools make sure you know how to use them. There's really no benefit having all the equipment to repair a flat in the field if when it happens you don't know how to actually do the job.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  21. #21
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    The wheels are listed as Kenda Kwick, 700x40. Which type of pump would I need? one that moves at high pressure or volume?

    I plan to pick up a bottle and pump first. Most of my rides will be close enough to my house/bike shop which I shouldn't run into to many problems. But I'd like the pump because I figure it will be important to keep tire pressure up.
    Last edited by mojoe_24; 03-20-12 at 12:58 PM.

  22. #22
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoe_24 View Post
    The wheels are listed as Kenda Kwick, 700x40. Which type of pump would I need? one that moves at high pressure or volume?

    I plan to pick up a bottle and pump first. Most of my rides will be close enough to my house/bike shop which I shouldn't run into to many problems. But I'd like the pump because I figure it will be important to keep tire pressure up.

    If you're going to be staying near home for a time the repair stuff can wait, as long as you're willing to take the risk that you'll be walking home if anything does go wrong.

    If you're wanting a pump to keep the tyres topped up look at track pumps. They are much bigger than the things you'd mount on a bike, and can pump a tyre much faster. I use my track pump to pump the tyres on my car, since my footpump broke and I never got around to replacing it - I wouldn't care to attempt that task with the pump I carry on the bike with me.

    It does potentially mean you end up buying two pumps, if money is too tight to consider that then get something you can mount on the bike later on.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  23. #23
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    What's the recommended pressure for those tires?

    And no one has said so yet, but ultimately (probably sooner rather than later) you'll need two pumps - one frame pump for taking on the bike, and one floor pump to keep at home. It takes a fair bit of work to pump up a tire with a frame pump, even an exceptionally well-designed one, compared to the ease of floor pumps. Plus with most frame pumps that attach directly to the valve stem you always run the risk of damaging that stem, especially as you get more tired from pumping and your form/grip goes to hell. Floor pumps are easier to use in general, and with their heads at the ends of a flexible hose, you're much less likely to damage anything.
    Craig in Indy

  24. #24
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    I have a compressor at home. I could jut use that right?

  25. #25
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    mojoe, that's not really a good idea... depending on the valve on your tube, it may not even work. compressors tend to move a large amount of air very fast, so you can blast the tire right off your rim if you're not careful.

    If it's all you have then by all means - go for it. You still need something to inflate tires while you're riding. I have one of those little dinky compressor things in my saddle bag because I got sick of my frame pump rattling.

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