Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thoughts for megaclyde

    Hey guys -

    Just wanted get some input on a possible used bike purchase. I'm 6'2'' and weigh 355lbs. I'd like to use the bike for exercise and recreational use. Want to take advantage of a nice, local bike path, as well as cruise around town. I won't be doing any offroading or venturing on dirt paths.

    Do you think something like this would suit me well?

    http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb...958237811.html

    The real wheel has a 36 spoke count, which seems like a plus. Obviously I won't know anything unless I test it out, but would you suggest something like this to someone my size and to someone with my desires for biking?

  2. #2
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    10,844
    Mentioned
    178 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That bike will be way too small for you. I don't mean insufficient for your weight, I mean you're 6'2", you should probably be looking at bikes in about the 58cm range. Depending on your leg length relative to your torso, you may prefer one size up or down.

    As to whether something like that will hold up under you, I think we have some other riders here that can probably give you better advice. As a worst case scenario, the wheels fail prematurely and you will end up buying sturdier wheels, but that's hardly the end of the world.

    If you're bebopping around town, a hybrid with a rigid fork might be more suitable to get started on, and you can still put miles on it when you want to.

  3. #3
    Fat Cyclist
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Florida
    My Bikes
    '11 Cannondale SuperSix Dura-Ace
    Posts
    672
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At 6'2 I think you would want a 61cm frame or larger (I believe) and yeah, sturdier wheels. I am 284 and I my wheels have been giving me a lot of trouble lately.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. - Jiddu Krishnamurti

  4. #4
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    10,844
    Mentioned
    178 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm 6'2 and I stick with my 58 cm recommendation. I've owned 57 (a little too small), 61 (way too big) and 58 (just right!) so somewhere in there should work for you.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last edited by Rifford; 04-17-12 at 11:58 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    509
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Axiom View Post
    At 6'2 I think you would want a 61cmframe or larger (I believe)

    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    I'm 6'2 and I stick with my 58cm recommendation. I've owned 57 (a little too small), 61 (way too big) and 58(just right!) so somewhere in there should work for you.


    Everyone’s built a little different but I agree with TrojanHorse. I'm also 6'2" and a 58cm Top Tube is what fits me best, a 61cm top tube is just too long.

  7. #7
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm 6'2" and I ride a 60cm with a 90 mm stem so a 59 is probably a perfect fit. If it was a 56 I say probably not but a 54 is for more like 5'8" guy's bike.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Would the bikes shown support my weight and suit my needs?

  9. #9
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    10,844
    Mentioned
    178 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Those 3 bikes all look roughly equivalent - down tube shifting is annoying but the good news is that it's friction shift, so you don't have to be fussy about setting up your shifters & derailleurs. I think that salmon color would keep me from riding in public though.

    The other thing to consider at that price point is consumables - the fuji bike owner admits you'll probably have to buy new tires, and those can run you about $30 each for modestly priced ones. Chain & sprocket wear is something else worth looking at and I wouldn't know how to describe how to check that in a post but you can do a little light internet reading before you go shopping.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow, that guy with the bikes from Azusa has annoying listings...

    Anyways, the Univegas were built by Miyata, so if it fits you and is in good shape, you could certainly do a lot worse.

    I have a mid-80s Bianchi that was built in Japan and is a very nice (looking and riding) bike. I've read and heard the opinions that a Japanese-built Bianchi should not sell for as much as an Italian-built, though Mr. Sheldon Brown opines that the Japanese-built ones were better quality and I would agree whole-heartedly.

    That Fuji looks nice. Newer. Possibly made in Taiwan.


    I don't know your market prices for used bikes, but around here (Cincinnati, OH) those are all WAY high. By double, maybe.
    NB: Well, high for normal pricing. I forgot to factor in the spring-time inflation.
    Last edited by Wolfwerx; 04-18-12 at 12:20 PM. Reason: inflation

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    The other thing to consider at that price point is consumables - the fuji bike owner admits you'll probably have to buy new tires, and those can run you about $30 each for modestly priced ones. Chain & sprocket wear is something else worth looking at and I wouldn't know how to describe how to check that in a post but you can do a little light internet reading before you go shopping.
    +1
    It's easy to hit $100 real fast when making your used "treasure" rideable. Tubes, tires, rim tape, wraps, cables/housings, chains, etc...

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    50
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just another experience to throw out there - I'm around 6'2" but ride a 56 that I've made a few adjustments too since I have a really long torso and arms, but very short legs (29" inseam, 33" length).

  13. #13
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,998
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Axiom View Post
    At 6'2 I think you would want a 61cm frame or larger (I believe) and yeah, sturdier wheels. I am 284 and I my wheels have been giving me a lot of trouble lately.
    I'm closer to 6'4 and find myself between a 58 and a 61. In terms of the length of the bike I'd go for a 61 but chose a 58 Tricross because the top tube on the 61 was uncomfortably close to my more sensitive parts when I stood over it. Ideally I'd like a 61 with a slightly lower top tube but for now at least don't fancy the expense of having a frame custom made.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  14. #14
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "At 6'2 I think you would want a 61cm frame or larger..."
    "I'm 6'2 and I stick with my 58 cm recommendation. I've owned..."
    "I'm also 6'2" and a 58cm Top Tube is what fits me best..."
    "I'm 6'2" and I ride a 60cm..."
    "I'm around 6'2" but ride a 56..."
    "I'm closer to 6'4 and find myself between a 58 and a 61..."

    This is exactly why one should never get fit opinions over the internet from people who have never seen you. One of them may be right but do you know which one? It's much better, if you don't know how to fit yourself properly, to go to a good bike shop and get fitted so that you know exactly what you are looking for. There is way more to bike fit than just how tall you are.

    Regarding wheels, don't put too much stock in spoke count all by itself. A 40 spoke wheel will fall apart just as fast as a 28 spoke wheel if it isn't built properly. Whatever bike you buy (even if it's used), make sure that the wheels are tensioned properly or you'll be breaking spokes before you know it. btw, those vintage Puegots are nice bikes but $350 is a bit steep.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  15. #15
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    10,844
    Mentioned
    178 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On the contrary Homey! Clearly the stack of 6'2" riders here have universally selected bikes larger than 54, which is what the OP was originally considering.
    The guy on a 56 says he has unusual proportions and the guy on the 60 says he's using a somewhat smaller stem than normal.

    I don't think anybody is saying you have to ride a 58 if you're 6'2" but it's interesting to see for normative reasons.

    The point about getting a good bike shop to fit you is sound advice though, I'll +1 that.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've visited some LBS and got to look at some great bikes. I just thought that going used for my first bike in many years might be a good way to save money. But I can see how the dollar sign can go up even on a used bike after you have to invest money to make sure you're getting a quality ride.

    One thing I've always considered with CL is that when someone asks for a certain dollar amount, they're not going to get that amount. They're throwing up a high number that is meant to be brought down. I wouldn't just hand someone $350 and call it a day. Asking for $350 shows the potential of getting the item for $250.

  17. #17
    Senior Member gyozadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sunnyvale, California
    My Bikes
    Bridgestone RB-1, 600, T700, MB-6 w/ Dirt Drops, MB-Zip, Bianchi Limited, Nashbar Hounder
    Posts
    1,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rifford:

    All your CL links look like you're committed to a road bike with somewhat narrow tires.

    And just FYI, I'm around 6' 1.5" with short legs, long torso, mid-short arms. I ride a 58 cm for road/ss/fixie/flat bar street. 59 cm for touring and 57 for cyclo-cross... roughly and 53cm - 56cm (effective seat tube Center-to-Top) for MTB.

    What I thought might be interesting is to ask the question whether you considered perhaps an early 90's steel MTB?

    Old steel MTB frames would use oversized butted tubing which should be a bit sturdier than a road frame. Many had beefy, unicrown solid forks (non-suspension) and they support wider tires. They should also all have vertical dropouts if post 1990.

    The dropout isn't a deal-killer for me, but the one thing I'm paranoid about being a Clyde is my propensity to pull wheels forward on horizontal drop outs. The multiple right elbow abrasion and lump of bulging scar tissue with no hair left that covers the elbow tip is sort of testament to why I should be paranoid. I even have chain-tugs to stop axle creep on my ss/fixie because it does slip. Yes, I could torque those nuts down really good and maybe it wouldn't move. But if I'm doing a 30 - 50 mile ride out in to the semi-boonies, I need the 15mm axle nut to be loose enough to be removable by portable tools to take that wheel out and replace the tube. If I really torque down the drive-side nut, I can't. It happened once on the way to work just 2 miles out on my 9 mile commute. A chunk of metal gouged a massive gaping hole in the tube that didn't take to a patch well. I couldn't remove the wheel, but I was able to patch it long enough to get to work and then use tools at work to properly remove the wheel and then replace the tube. I now have chain tugs that prevent forward creep. I keep a spare one in my seat bag in case the M6 threaded bolt fails due to fatigue and I get a little slippage. Then I can install the replacement and continue on. I don't know if others ride that hard, but I've dealt with component failure due to being big for quite some decades and this is what some of us have to do. I'd rather be prepared for it and know what to do, instead of get stranded or have to call someone for help, who may not be there.

    On vintage road bikes, I have to only buy high-quality frames with thicker forged rear drop-outs (usually ones with the Campy-style adjuster screws). Reason is these provide enough meat for the QRs to bite into so I don't pull the axle out. I had a fellow rider do exactly that on an older Univega with stamped drop-outs this weekend. At age 59, the crash wasn't bad abrasion-wise because he wore long sleeves and long pants and gloves. But it happened at mile 34 of a 52 mile ride. We fixed the problem and he finished - no broken bones - but not without him taking a double dose of Motrin IB at the next stop 3 miles from there and we rested for nearly 1 hr to let the med take effect and have him eat something.

    And if you've never broken a newer QR skewer, well, it's not fun. I have and primarily in recent years using newer hubs/QRs on vintage bikes with horizontal dropouts. More abrasion on the right elbow. They just don't make 'em like they used to. I do sometimes go on eBay and buy old skewers. I luckily have some inventory on older stock Shimano skewers now (love the 600 Ultegra tri-colour ones - 6400 series). They have held up really well for me. But again, not an issue with vertical dropouts if the frame is still aligned.

    But I digress, because the drop-out issue is important to me.

    But here's something I think you might like. I recently picked up an upgraded Bridgestone MB-6 that had Deore XT/Deore DX equipment that was frankly, dirty, but in excellent condition. I paid $100 for it. Even the rims and hubs were still good. I spent some time cleaning it, and overhauled every piece, and it now rides really nice. The seller had new 2.125 knobbies on it. I replaced them with a set of 26 x 1.5 IRC metro 2 city tires and added some old fenders on it and I made a great flat bar commuter bike. It hauls my 279 lbs around pretty nice and I've done 50 milers no problem with this. It's a 56cm frame, a little bit bigger than what I use for offroad (53cm - more standover clearance), but otherwise perfect for street riding and quite comfy. There's clearance for 2.25 inch knobbies with this bike or go with 1.75, 1.95 or 2.0 inch semi-slicks for even more comfortable and bomb-proof city riding.

    I spent about $30 for a new set of light Nashbar/Tektro Oryx cantilever brakes, about $15 for 72 new cheap 14g stainless spokes (I get bulk pricing sometimes), and I replaced the BB with a sealed cartridge unit with steel cups (vuelta BB - $13) and got a cheap 175mm Vuelta, Montagna crankset ($25) and used about $6 worth of new housing and caps, and $4 in new brake and derailleur cables. He had a pretty new, unstretched silver KMC Z chain. I added IRC metro2 26 x 1.5, which were $15/pr, and tubes were $5.00/pr. I used about $2 worth of bulk German rim tape and $9 for a Kalloy 350mm 26.2mm diameter seat post, and of course, $14 for an MTB anatomic gel foam saddle. Yes, I had to shop for prices and free shipping. But I tend to stock lots of parts myself too, so not necessarily a fair comparison on prices for the average hobbiest. But I spent another $130 or so.

    For $230, it's far better equipment than I think one can get at Walmart or Target. And if you were my neighbour, I'd probably loan it to you to try out just to get a feel for it. I think it'll take 400 lbs without too much complaining. After all, I was 325 at my heaviest and rode around with fully loaded panniers on a similar bike I converted to drops. I even broke pedal spindles on that bike and both frame and wheels certainly have held up and it's been such a pleasure to ride something that stable and road-worthy.

    Just thought you might think about other aspects of bike shopping and what to look for.

    Good luck.
    Yes, I can roll my own potsticker skins!

  18. #18
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rifford View Post
    I've visited some LBS and got to look at some great bikes. I just thought that going used for my first bike in many years might be a good way to save money. But I can see how the dollar sign can go up even on a used bike after you have to invest money to make sure you're getting a quality ride.

    One thing I've always considered with CL is that when someone asks for a certain dollar amount, they're not going to get that amount. They're throwing up a high number that is meant to be brought down. I wouldn't just hand someone $350 and call it a day. Asking for $350 shows the potential of getting the item for $250.
    There are a couple formulas that will get you close to the proper frame size for you. They aren't as good as a full fitting but they will put you in the ballpark. The first is the Lemond formula. It is your inseam x 0.67. The second is the Peterson/Rivendell formula. It is your inseam -15cm. In general, Peterson/Rivendell formula will give you a slightly larger frame size and the LeMond formula is typically adjusted upwards for riders above 6' tall.

    To measure your inseam stand in your bare feet with your back against a wall, feet comfortably apart. Place the spine of a large coffee table book against the wall between your legs and slide it up along the wall until it is firmly against bone. Have a friend run a tape measure from the floor to the top of the book. This is your inseam, or pubic bone height.

    Finally, for reference, a few years ago I bought a 1970 Peugot Competition Lite in similar condition as the one you're looking at for $100 from a bike shop.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  19. #19
    Senior Member gyozadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sunnyvale, California
    My Bikes
    Bridgestone RB-1, 600, T700, MB-6 w/ Dirt Drops, MB-Zip, Bianchi Limited, Nashbar Hounder
    Posts
    1,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    There are a couple formulas that will get you close to the proper frame size for you. They aren't as good as a full fitting but they will put you in the ballpark. The first is the Lemond formula. It is your inseam x 0.67. The second is the Peterson/Rivendell formula. It is your inseam -15cm. In general, Peterson/Rivendell formula will give you a slightly larger frame size and the LeMond formula is typically adjusted upwards for riders above 6' tall."
    I like the Rivendell system a little better because for me, the taller frame means the handlebars aren't too low. I don't usually ride the drops, and if I do, I like them higher because crouching too low for a middle aged guy like me with some gut isn't great for breathing or my neck. I don't race anymore. I just tour and do casual rides which might have steady grades, but I spin and honk a little. With short legs and short arms sort of, I don't like to sit too far back and spin. I have more torso mass and like to have a little bit more vertical weight over the pedals, hence shorter seat post, higher handler bars.

    But I can see the advantage of a more sit-back and spin style for guys with more of a "cycling" physique. And 20 years ago, I really liked that style. But alas, my glutes and hamstrings aren't what they used to be.
    Yes, I can roll my own potsticker skins!

  20. #20
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    "At 6'2 I think you would want a 61cm frame or larger..."
    "I'm 6'2 and I stick with my 58 cm recommendation. I've owned..."
    "I'm also 6'2" and a 58cm Top Tube is what fits me best..."
    "I'm 6'2" and I ride a 60cm..."
    "I'm around 6'2" but ride a 56..."
    "I'm closer to 6'4 and find myself between a 58 and a 61..."

    This is exactly why one should never get fit opinions over the internet from people who have never seen you. One of them may be right but do you know which one? It's much better, if you don't know how to fit yourself properly, to go to a good bike shop and get fitted so that you know exactly what you are looking for. There is way more to bike fit than just how tall you are.

    Regarding wheels, don't put too much stock in spoke count all by itself. A 40 spoke wheel will fall apart just as fast as a 28 spoke wheel if it isn't built properly. Whatever bike you buy (even if it's used), make sure that the wheels are tensioned properly or you'll be breaking spokes before you know it. btw, those vintage Puegots are nice bikes but $350 is a bit steep.
    I think this thread taken as a whole would tell an inexperienced shopper that there is a variety of sizes that 6'2" people ride. As far as LBS sizing how is a new buyer able to tell a good LBS from a sell you what we got LBS? Not one LBS I've ever been in measured me before trying to sell me a 58cm roadbike... if they had one. He is looking at used bikes so spending $150 on a fitting doesn't seem to be what the OP is in to. I won't even get into the lack of uniformity on the Bicycle's mfg's sizing or possibly that seat tube measurements are only one consideration when fitting a bicycle. Yes those of us that ride a lot have a good idea what fits. Someone without a bike has only other people's opinions.

  21. #21
    Senior Member gunner65's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lexington KY
    My Bikes
    Salsa Casseroll for Street and Airborne Hobgoblin for dirt
    Posts
    476
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I were looking for an inexpensive entry level steel bike I would by this one so long as I knew what size I needed and I am 6'2" and I would buy the large but I know my needs.

    http://www.giantnerd.com/schwinn-le-...-beginner.html

  22. #22
    Fredly
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    My Bikes
    Surly Long Haul Trucker w/ SRAM Rival, & 36H 38's, Late 70's Santana Tandem w/ Double Diamond frame
    Posts
    471
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm 6'2" and was 330 when I started riding my Surly Cross-Check.

    If I was you, I'd have an LBS build a Surly Cross-Check with SRAM Apex setup so you can do some easy climbing. Have them or someone else build you a set of 36H Velocity Chukker rims on Shimano XT hubs. That's what I'm using and my wheels are "bomb-proof". I've even broken 2 spokes on one ride and still had a rideable wheel. (The builder overtensioned a number of spokes to 200-230 which has since been corrected.)

    I'm around 285 now and since I rebuilt these wheels to be perfectly tensioned and true it's the first time ever I've been able to jump a curb and not have to worry about my wheel going out of true. I'd recommend them for any clydesdale.



    Quote Originally Posted by Rifford View Post
    Hey guys -

    Just wanted get some input on a possible used bike purchase. I'm 6'2'' and weigh 355lbs. I'd like to use the bike for exercise and recreational use. Want to take advantage of a nice, local bike path, as well as cruise around town. I won't be doing any offroading or venturing on dirt paths.

    Do you think something like this would suit me well?

    http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb...958237811.html

    The real wheel has a 36 spoke count, which seems like a plus. Obviously I won't know anything unless I test it out, but would you suggest something like this to someone my size and to someone with my desires for biking?
    Last edited by iconicflux; 04-20-12 at 09:23 AM.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jethro56 View Post
    I think this thread taken as a whole would tell an inexperienced shopper that there is a variety of sizes that 6'2" people ride. As far as LBS sizing how is a new buyer able to tell a good LBS from a sell you what we got LBS? Not one LBS I've ever been in measured me before trying to sell me a 58cm roadbike... if they had one. He is looking at used bikes so spending $150 on a fitting doesn't seem to be what the OP is in to. I won't even get into the lack of uniformity on the Bicycle's mfg's sizing or possibly that seat tube measurements are only one consideration when fitting a bicycle. Yes those of us that ride a lot have a good idea what fits. Someone without a bike has only other people's opinions.
    It's really a tough question. People are all over the place size wise and if you ask if a bike is going to fit you you're going to get a bunch of "personal" opinions. Without someone actually taking the appropriate measurements most of those personal opinions will be wrong. Then you have a beginner out there on an uncomfortable bike that they are not going to want to ride. It is a bit of a "rock and a hard place" situation. That's why I posted those basic fitting formulas. That at least will get him close to where he should be and is way more productive than a bunch of people saying "I ride this or I ride that..." Everyone here has very good intentions and I don't see anyone out to steer anyone wrong but when you have so many different experiences/opinions all put forth at the same time all it does is muddy up the waters.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  24. #24
    Senior Member gyozadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sunnyvale, California
    My Bikes
    Bridgestone RB-1, 600, T700, MB-6 w/ Dirt Drops, MB-Zip, Bianchi Limited, Nashbar Hounder
    Posts
    1,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    It's really a tough question. People are all over the place size wise and if you ask if a bike is going to fit you you're going to get a bunch of "personal" opinions. Without someone actually taking the appropriate measurements most of those personal opinions will be wrong. Then you have a beginner out there on an uncomfortable bike that they are not going to want to ride. It is a bit of a "rock and a hard place" situation. That's why I posted those basic fitting formulas. That at least will get him close to where he should be and is way more productive than a bunch of people saying "I ride this or I ride that..." Everyone here has very good intentions and I don't see anyone out to steer anyone wrong but when you have so many different experiences/opinions all put forth at the same time all it does is muddy up the waters.
    I think the basic formulas you posted work just fine. They get into the ball park exactly as intended. And if you look at all the folks (include myself) who chimed in on frame size, for someone 6ft 1 - 2 inch tall, the exact frame that lies in the middle that the vast majority of folks in that height range can adapt to ride very comfortably will be 58 cm.

    For me, the real issue is the unseen cost of a good professional fitting that will swap and install key parts like stems, handlebars, cables and housing, new wrap, and possibly saddle and seat post if required. I know some shops do charge appropriately for a professional fitting. But I also know that lots of folks looking to just get into cycling have no initial concept of what a good fitting bicycle ought to feel like and expect a pre-assembled bike off the floor to fit them equally well. And if they're lucky, the pre-assembled bike may be a great fit with just minor adjustments. But based on a lot of riders I see out there, their bikes could use a better fitting and that might require parts and labour. That's why I think getting the frame size in the right ball park is the easy part. It's getting the other stuff like stem rise, stem extension, handlebar width, handlebar rotation, brake lever position, handlebar sweep angle (flat bars), handlebar rise/cant, cable housing length, cable length, seat fore/aft position, tilt, seat post extension, crank arm length, Q-factor, etc. that all affect the ride.
    Yes, I can roll my own potsticker skins!

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    672
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Several of the bikes you listed are considered vintage. I ride only vintage bikes

    and have preference for the classic stuff. The Bianchi looks like it had some thought put into it with the bar-end shifters. The Fuji is the only 'modern' cycle on your posts but it would be easier to maintain as many shops simply have never seen the old stuff and parts can be hard come by. As mentioned, the weak spots are the wheels. 36 spokes should work for you with a strong rim. I would go with a 700x28 or700x32 tire.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •