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  1. #1
    Tuc
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    Need some confirmation from the Clydes!

    My buddy is 6'2", 280lbs and at 25 years old is strong and fit - especially his legs since he has ridden bikes everywhere all his life. But, he rides mountain bikes in a style like those little 80lb punk kids on BMX bikes, always jumping curbs and doing tricks that hammers the heck out of all of his bikes. Twists BB, cranks, seatposts and seats, breaks pedals and I don't know how many rims he has either taco'ed or broke spokes on. So, right now he is struggling to keep one bike going at all and he had to bail on a ride with me this morning because the hub gave out two blocks from his house.

    Now, here is what I want to ask you; I have a 62cm 1984 Motobecane Grand Touring bike with probably only a hundred miles total on it - essentially brand new. I took off the steel 27" wheels and put on clincher Mavic Open Pro wheels with Ultegra hubs and 10 speed cogs. Sorted out all the chainline stuff, and greased/adjusted everything and it is a sweet ride but just a little big for me. My buddy will not ride it, saying it is not a strong enough bike, that it won't support his weight. I have told him it will, that I can take care of anything that gets broke easily from my spares - just don't go hopping it off curbs while we are out road riding.

    Can I get a little support here? Is this bike with those rims strong enough to support both his weight and strength as long as he doesn't ride it like a BMX bike? This pic was taken with a different set of rims, but the ones I had in mind for him was the Mavics that I have on it now.

    Thanks for any insight you can give.

    Last edited by Tuc; 04-22-12 at 12:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    first piece of advice is to tell him to stop riding that way when you lend him your bike.

  3. #3
    Tuc
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    Yes, I think he is cool with that, but he still thinks it is his weight and not his riding style that causes all the breakage,... he is young, only carrying that much weight and strength for what? Maybe six years tops? Some of you guys on this forum have been riding for 30 years looking for a stout enough bike to ride respectfully - is this a model that holds up? I could put the steel wheels back on, the extra 5lbs won't bother him.
    Last edited by Tuc; 04-22-12 at 01:04 PM.

  4. #4
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Wow, that is a beautiful bike. I'd give you a very good price for that, especially as it looks exactly my size, it's an absolute crackerjack.

    On the basis of what you say, I'd be cautious about loaning this to your friend. Yes, it can take his weight. But it certainly can't take the treatment he is accustomed to dish out. For example, I ride mavic openpros myself, with 32 DT Swiss spokes. And while I am only just over 200 lbs, and a fairly "light" rider in terms of my demands on the equipment, I'd be reasonably sanguine about putting another 50lbs or so on the bike. But I wouldn't be bouncing them around, staying in the saddle through potholes, and so on. Also, it's a big frame. It is inevitable that it is slightly more vulnerable to lateral, twisting forces than a smaller one in the same tubing. Again, this is no problem if it is treated right. Someone who habitually twists BB shells wouldn't be my choice.

    Sorry, I am unduly influenced by my lust for this absolutely lovely bike. But if you really want to loan it to him, I'd do so as a training exercise for him. If he treats it with respect, it will be fine, and he will have learned that the problem is not what he is, but what he does. BUt does he know how to treat it with respect?
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  5. #5
    Tuc
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    Wow, that is a beautiful bike. I'd give you a very good price for that, especially as it looks exactly my size, it's an absolute crackerjack.

    On the basis of what you say, I'd be cautious about loaning this to your friend. Yes, it can take his weight. But it certainly can't take the treatment he is accustomed to dish out. For example, I ride mavic openpros myself, with 32 DT Swiss spokes. And while I am only just over 200 lbs, and a fairly "light" rider in terms of my demands on the equipment, I'd be reasonably sanguine about putting another 50lbs or so on the bike. But I wouldn't be bouncing them around, staying in the saddle through potholes, and so on. Also, it's a big frame. It is inevitable that it is slightly more vulnerable to lateral, twisting forces than a smaller one in the same tubing. Again, this is no problem if it is treated right. Someone who habitually twists BB shells wouldn't be my choice.

    Sorry, I am unduly influenced by my lust for this absolutely lovely bike. But if you really want to loan it to him, I'd do so as a training exercise for him. If he treats it with respect, it will be fine, and he will have learned that the problem is not what he is, but what he does. BUt does he know how to treat it with respect?
    Very thoughtful response, thank you. As for selling it, I don't know - recently I have engaged the "N+2" acquisition threshold with a Raleigh Pro purchase - there is some push back from the wife - let you know....

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    always push back from the wife

  7. #7
    Tuc
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    ah, my girl is a peach, because even I recognize the "N+1" has been violated!

  8. #8
    Senior Member RedC's Avatar
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    I ride a CF Lemond Buenos Aires with Mavic Open Pro rims 36 spokes in the back and 32 in the front. I've ridden this bike since December 2008 when I weighed 280lbs. I am not a gentle rider and the only problems I've had were broken spokes and rim issues. There is no reason your friend can't ride your bike
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    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedC View Post
    I ride a CF Lemond Buenos Aires with Mavic Open Pro rims 36 spokes in the back and 32 in the front. I've ridden this bike since December 2008 when I weighed 280lbs. I am not a gentle rider and the only problems I've had were broken spokes and rim issues. There is no reason your friend can't ride your bike
    LOL. The only problems you have had are broken spokes and rim issues? On a 36-spoke wheel? How many problems do you want?
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I rode Mavic OP's at 230 lbs, mostly smooth trail and I THRASH Mavic OP's. I've never had an OP last over 2000 miles in a rear wheel, all hand built different builders. I had one front OP that lasted about 4000 miles. All 32 spoke wheels.

    IMO, I wouldn't let the dude borrow the bike. You're gambling with your wheels and if something does happen, you get "I told you so" and you're left with a $100 bill to rebuild the sucker.

  11. #11
    Senior Member tergal's Avatar
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    Can you teach him ?

    show him how to ride road, and how to treat the equipment ?

    I ask because some people just need to he shown, others well we won't go there
    Tact is for people who arenít witty enough to use sarcasm.

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  12. #12
    Tuc
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    Never heard him mention owning a road bike, it is possible he has rarely ridden one. And I can see from the direction of the comments, that the rims are the weakest point for his riding style, and that doesn't really surprise me too much because I have broken rims off road. But then, a broken spoke on an Open Pro on a road bike let go last year instantly getting fouled in the chain and pulled the rim surrounding the spoke grommet out, and I was riding reasonably.

    Please feel free to add comments on the sturdiness of the Grand Touring and it's SupraLight cranks,BB, etc, I will appreciate them. And I did search this Clydes forum for the impressions people have given on the strong part upgrades you have made to your bikes, maybe I can work with some of those ideas even on an old French bike.

    Made up my mind to put the original steel wheels back on the bike and offer to let him ride with me on that - again to state the situation correctly: I offered and he refused saying the Motobecane is not strong enough for his weight. And of course, he might be able to sort out one of his own mountain bikes before next weekend which makes it moot, I just don't have any useful parts to help him on that.
    Last edited by Tuc; 04-23-12 at 07:38 AM.

  13. #13
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuc View Post
    Yes, I think he is cool with that, but he still thinks it is his weight and not his riding style that causes all the breakage,... he is young, only carrying that much weight and strength for what? Maybe six years tops? Some of you guys on this forum have been riding for 30 years looking for a stout enough bike to ride respectfully - is this a model that holds up? I could put the steel wheels back on, the extra 5lbs won't bother him.
    In he thinks it's not his riding style, he will break it, no question about it.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member volosong's Avatar
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    Just as a "test" for him, ask him to just ride down the street to the end and back. He'll see that the bike won't fold up under him. Then, go for a mile or so.

    But, as other have said, give him a little lecture first about how to "respect" and ride a road bike. Then, don't let him out of your sight when he's riding that sweet gem of a bike.

    p.s. I've been riding for several years with 16/20 spoke count wheels, and have had no issues at all. All I do is just watch the road and avoid little potholes, rocks, road debris and such. I'll even take my weight off the seat when I go over those unavoidable expansion cracks in the asphalt.
    Last edited by volosong; 04-23-12 at 07:52 AM.
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  15. #15
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    Let him borrow it, but only when you and he go riding together. Chances are he's not going to abuse your bike while you're there with him. Under normal riding conditions the bike should be strong enough to handle his weight. No bike is strong enough to withstand willful abuse for an extended amount of time.
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    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
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    I think that he will kill Open Pros fast. They are not made to take big impacts, and like with Mr. Beanz, they fall apart on me just hitting potholes and going over rather smooth RR tracks.

    He has broken/bent bottom brackets...hmmm.

    If it were me, I'd lend it to him, but fully expect to have to replace the rims, BB, and perhaps the rear hub.

    He should not hurt the frame, handlebars, seat, etc.

    Perhaps he can pitch-in cash as he breaks things?
    Last edited by Pinyon; 04-23-12 at 12:38 PM.
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  17. #17
    Carpe Velo Yo Spiff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuc View Post
    Can I get a little support here? Is this bike with those rims strong enough to support both his weight and strength as long as he doesn't ride it like a BMX bike?
    As long as those wheels are well made, and he doesn't abuse them, not a problem. I was at 286 pounds in February of 2010 and my skinny tired road bike held up just fine.
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  18. #18
    Tuc
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    Spoke with the friend that introduced us, he says the guy has had hassles over financing his masters in college, he probably just doesn't want to borrow anything from anybody right now. Oh well, he was one of five other guys that would ride regular, now three are too busy or reluctant to get out before 6am to beat the heat and the other is recovering from major surgery. Guess I will continue riding alone, but I put the steel wheels on anyway, just in case he changes his mind. I personally think the OP wheels with Ultegra hubs are strong enough, I weigh 190lbs, but I am not too sure of the BB and the cranks on that French bike.

  19. #19
    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    He's 6'2" and the frame is a 62cm? IMHO, the bike is too big for him, anyway - if he has average proportions. I'm 6'2" and have been told 58 is ideal - 60 if I want it a little bigger.

    I rode my Motobecane Super Mirage almost every day through high school. It was an awesome bike for me!
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  20. #20
    Tuc
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    Sometimes I wonder about frame size recommendations; here is a chart http://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-too...izer/road-bike at 6'2" does this chart predict a 58cm frame for you? At 5"11" with longer legs (and arms) than many people I measure 33 1/2" leg length, measured properly not going off from pant sizes. The chart says 58cm for me, and I ride 58's and 60's - this Motobecane is the largest I own at 62cm, and it took some adjusting to get it comfortable for me, even though it is awkward to stop or throw a leg over. Sure is shiny tho,..

  21. #21
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJoe View Post
    He's 6'2" and the frame is a 62cm? IMHO, the bike is too big for him, anyway - if he has average proportions. I'm 6'2" and have been told 58 is ideal - 60 if I want it a little bigger.

    I rode my Motobecane Super Mirage almost every day through high school. It was an awesome bike for me!
    I think the advice you have been given is too simplistic. People are sized to bikes too small for them these days, which is fine for young racers who can maintain an aggressive aero position(the pros ride tiny frames) but uncomfortable for the recreational rider.

    I am 6'3" with a 35" inseam, crotch to floor. I own a track bike which is a 58 and fits me but in a very aggressive posture that some people would struggle to tolerate. I also own a classic touring bike from the early eighties that is a 25" - 64cm - and fits me like a glove, but with very little seat post showing and the bars almost level with the saddle. This used to be standard but these days bikes are fitted with a bigger saddle to bar drop. I have a carbon road bike with a compact frame that is the equivalent of about a 60cm, and an expedition tourer at about 61cm.

    Bigger frames can often feel smaller, because the longer head tube puts the rider in a more upright position. The reach may be longer but doesn't feel as much of a stretch. It's a mistake to think that a given rider will want the same size frame for every bike, much depends on the style of riding that he/she wants to do and what makes them comfortable, given the geometry of the frame.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  22. #22
    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    I'll be the first to admit I'm no expert. In my untrained opinion, the OP's bike looks like it would be way too big for me, and way too big can't be fixed. I guess I should have been more clear. Bottom line, IF the friend is going to borrow it, I would think a basic test-ride would be appropriate to see if it does in fact fit him comfortably. Though I do see your point about seat to bar drop in the posted pic.
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  23. #23
    Tuc
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    The aggressive aero position, yes, that is a big factor in trying to fit as small a frame as possible for the racer. And too, smaller frame = less weight. Anyway, to shift from 58-60-62, I had to work the reach out to the same number on each that I feel comfortable with. What that number is for me is irrelevant, if I tweak my back dancing with the youngsters at a wedding I have to redo all the stems again,...

  24. #24
    Tuc
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    He went for a ride with me today on the Grand Touring, we had a blast but he misses his mountain bikes. He says he just doesn't like road bikes, but he enjoyed the ride anyway without breaking anything. He especially liked going really fast, knobby tires won't hit that kind of top end speed without a cliff.

  25. #25
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuc View Post
    He went for a ride with me today on the Grand Touring, we had a blast but he misses his mountain bikes. He says he just doesn't like road bikes, but he enjoyed the ride anyway without breaking anything. He especially liked going really fast, knobby tires won't hit that kind of top end speed without a cliff.

    Doesn't like road bikes? The boy ain't got no education.

    look on the bright side. Maybe that Motobecane has had a narrow escape.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

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