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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   Emergency Clyde Wheel Help Question?????? (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/813934-emergency-clyde-wheel-help-question.html)

Gator1313 04-26-12 12:39 PM

Emergency Clyde Wheel Help Question??????
 
I am a 50 year old Clydesdale 220 5'10" i ride a cannondale synapse alum with cf forks but I keep busting spins and getting flats. I was told to upgrade my wheels but the ones the bike store recommended where more expensive than the bike was to begin with! Any suggestions out there?

Tom Stormcrowe 04-26-12 04:20 PM

OK, first question: What wheels are they recommending? Personally, I'd recommend Velocity Deep V, in a 32 or 36 spoke configuration. 220 pounds isn't that heavy as Clyde's go, but with the Deep V, you'll get a wheel with decades of service life, so it's a good deal over time, and as you upgrade frames later, the wheels can move to the new frame, as well. Most you'd have to do is change out the cassette for the new gear setup if you opt for more gears in the newer setup.

I run Deep V's on my Alllez, with 36 spokes, and they are pretty much bulletproof. You can order them in sets here for less than $200.00. http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=Velocity+Deep+V

Mr. Beanz 04-26-12 04:37 PM

Have only the rear wheel built to save money.

I myself order a Deep V online, $60-$70. A hub ($100) then take to the shop to have them build it. Might be $65 labor plus spokes.

$250 should get you a darn good wheel. If you go through the shop, expect to pay more for the Deep V rim ($85) and for the hub ($150).

Order a wheel at prowheelbuilderdotcom.

Deep V, 105 hub, Dt Swiss spokes, 32 hole, 3cross wheel handbuilt for $169 thru their wheel building program, plus shipping.

------------
I'd buy online then have them build the front. For this price, you cn get both adnhave teh front hub ready for a later build


105 pair....$60
http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/roa...pd/SHIMHUBR492

Ultegra pair for $118
http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/roa...00/SHIMHUBR330
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Buy the rim online from prowheel....

Deep V for $61

http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/veloc...-700c-rim.html

or a Kinlin for $48

http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/veloc...-700c-rim.html

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$118 hubs, $60 rim, labor and spokes ($100)....$250 for a good wheel and you have the front hub for later as well. ;)

Yo Spiff 04-26-12 04:42 PM

Heck, I have cheapie wheels costing $30 each on my mountain bike and they hold up just fine. I did break a spoke on the previous rear wheel last summer, but the wheel was 10 years old. The Mavic wheels on my road bike have held up fine for 12 years now. I'm about the same weight as yourself right now, and have been over 280 at one time. I think there was some other problem with the construction of your wheels.

What is "busting spins"? Did you mean "spokes" or am I setting myself up to be ridiculed for not knowing a piece of terminology?

CACycling 04-26-12 05:00 PM

I'm heavier than you and running the stock, low-end Alex wheelset (20 spoke front / 24 spoke rear) on my road bike. Thousands of miles and haven't broken a single spoke. Did break a couple of spokes on my old commuter (really low-end, low-spoke-count wheelset and the spokes broke at the threads) but that was over several thousand miles of rough commuter service. At your weight, you shoulld not be having these issues unless you are really abusing them or they were not built properly.

As for flats, stock tires are usually not worth running. Get some decent tires with kevlar belt (or some other flat-resistant layer). I've had good success with Gatorskins but even the inexpensive Forte brand tires at Performance I run on my commuter are less prone to flatting than most stock tires.

bigfred 04-26-12 05:05 PM

220 isn't "that" heavy as far as clydes go. What wheels do you currentlyhave? If they're 32 hole, a new rim and spokes would probably suffice, as long as it's built by a knowledgable wheelsmith.

If you're not expriencing issues with the front, a new rear would be the next option. A 32 or 36 spoke hub of whatever quality you're willing to pay for, paired to a reasonably deep cross section rim, laced with straight 14ga or 14/15 double butted spokes and brass nipples should be more than adequate for your weight. As recommended above, I've just built up a Deep V to replace a Mavic pro that had earned retirement. I'm also waiting on some hubs to show up in the mail over the next day or two that will be getting laced to DT Swiss 585 rims.

As has alread been pointed out, a velocity Deep V laced to either a generic or shimano hub can be had for not much coin. However, I would suggest that such a wheel be taken to a wheelsmith, who can ensure that the spoke elbows have been properly formed to the outer flange, stress relieved and evenly tensioned. A little bit of time, attention and money at the earliest stage of a wheels life can extend its expectancy considerably.

fietsbob 04-26-12 05:05 PM

Spokes may have been under tensioned , in that case its lack of maintenance
rather than a parts problem .
Flats happen , but less with a top kevlar belt tire or the Schwalbe marathon + ..

bigfred 04-26-12 05:07 PM

With regard to the flats: Are they "pinch flats" or "punctures"? If pinch flats, you're not running enough pressure in your tires and bottoming out the rim against the road surface. This will definately place additional stress on the rim and spokes as the shock absorbing qualities of the tire have been eliminated.

sstorkel 04-26-12 05:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gator1313 (Post 14148701)
I am a 50 year old Clydesdale 220 5'10" i ride a cannondale synapse alum with cf forks but I keep busting spins and getting flats. I was told to upgrade my wheels but the ones the bike store recommended where more expensive than the bike was to begin with! Any suggestions out there?

The cheapest Synapse sold today has a MSRP of around $1000. I can't imagine you need wheels which are that expensive!

First step, I would think, it so make sure that your shop is doing the right things to solve the problem. Are they simply replacing a broken spoke and truing the wheel? Since you've broken multiple spokes, I would think they should check the tension on each and every spoke using a tension meter. Having each spoke properly tensioned is critical to wheel longevity!

The second step would be to figure out why you're getting so many flats. Are they pinch flats due to under-inflated tires? If that's the case, you may need to check tire pressure more frequently (ex: before every ride) or consider a higher-volume tire. If the flats are caused by debris (nails, staples, thorns, glass) you might consider switching to a tire that offers more flat protection (ex: Continental Gatorskin or Specialized Armadillo). If you're changing inner tubes yourself, make sure that you find the cause of the flat before installing a new tube. Leaving a piece of debris stuck in the tire will lead to another flat in relatively short order.

Gator1313 04-26-12 07:35 PM

Thank you for the advice...I have the Gatorskins already which have been great and I do check my pressure before every ride. I really do try to find whatever is causing the flats and sometimes I do but I guess I just don't do a real good job when I install it. Will the mechanics at the bike store really build my wheels if I buy the materials somewhere else? Sorry for the typo on the spokes...

bigfred 04-26-12 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gator1313 (Post 14150393)
Will the mechanics at the bike store really build my wheels if I buy the materials somewhere else? Sorry for the typo on the spokes...

That depends upon the shop. And, do you even want them rebuilding the wheel if they haven't been successful with the current? The answer to that question may have a lot to do with whether it was a new wheel, or if you bought it used, whether they had every opportunity to maintain it in the first place, or not, and any council they provided you along the way, which you may or may not have followed.

Typically, if I was going to ask a shop to build a wheel for me, I would purchase the parts from them. Unless they could not supply the exact parts I wanted. Then I would have no problem providing my mechanic of choice with my parts of choice. But, if you're simply asking about trying to buy parts from the internet for the lowest possible cost and provide those to them for their mechanic to work on, don't be surprised if you find some resistance. While its true that you should be paying for the mechanics time, LBS' need every revenue stream to help pay for the bricks and mortar.

Mr. Beanz 04-26-12 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gator1313 (Post 14150393)
Will the mechanics at the bike store really build my wheels if I buy the materials somewhere else?

I've been there. I looked for a shop with a builder via recomendations. It ook the parts in and asked him to build the wheel. He did. Labor plus spokes is about $100. If they don't want the money, somebody else will. ;)

But honestly, I myslef wouldn't waste my time with the LBS. I'd go to Prowheelbuilderdotcom. Kinlin 105 32 hole 3 x for a decent price

go to "wheelbuilding program" you chose and select the components then it totals it up at the end with a price. Front, rear or both. ;)

click on image to enlarge

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7053/7...de9d5a515d.jpg
wheelprogram by gulpxtreme, on Flickr


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