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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 05-24-12, 03:42 PM   #1
1weasel
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Major Mechanical



Well, first time for anything I guess. Had the bottom bracket separate from the seat & down tubes on my ride today. Called the shop I usually deal with and got two suggestions: buy a new bike or find a frame welder, without offering anyone who can do the work.

Guess I'll be riding the fixed gear this weekend.
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Old 05-24-12, 03:50 PM   #2
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Yep. That's pretty major. There's an upside. You can get a better frame and move the parts over!
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Old 05-24-12, 04:04 PM   #3
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I really want a picture.
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Old 05-24-12, 04:16 PM   #4
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I should shoot for that this weekend, then get the Ti frame I want...
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Old 05-24-12, 05:33 PM   #5
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Major Bummer. Upgrade time!
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Old 05-24-12, 05:47 PM   #6
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Major Bummer. Upgrade time!
+1!
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Old 05-24-12, 06:10 PM   #7
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First, I'm sorry to hear that. What kind of frame was it?

Second,



Thirdly, and I swear I am not on commission nor do I benefit in any way, but what size frame do you need?

http://www.lynskeyperformance.com/st...os-size-l.html

Size Large Lynskey Helix OS for $3,959 painted red. Not sure if it's a demo or an upgrade/return. Only one at the price, so when it's gone, this post is useless.

Sorry, I thought the post about the Ti frame was from the OP. I realized after re-reading that it's not. Nevermind!
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Old 05-24-12, 06:27 PM   #8
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Well, first time for anything I guess. Had the bottom bracket separate from the seat & down tubes on my ride today. Called the shop I usually deal with and got two suggestions: buy a new bike or find a frame welder, without offering anyone who can do the work.
Finding someone to repair your frame will be difficult. You can't just find a random welder, you need someone who knows about bicycle frames. If you're able to find this welder, they'll have to strip the paint around the area to be repaired, do the welding while trying to keep the frame straight, and then you'll have to pay a bundle to get the frame repainted.

If you buy a new frame from the same company that manufactured the broken frame, you might see if they'll sell you the new frame as part of their crash replacement plan... if they have one. Some manufacturers give generous discounts if you're buying a new frame to replace one that was damaged in a crash.
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Old 05-24-12, 06:37 PM   #9
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If you buy a new frame from the same company that manufactured the broken frame, you might see if they'll sell you the new frame as part of their crash replacement plan... if they have one. Some manufacturers give generous discounts if you're buying a new frame to replace one that was damaged in a crash.
Excellent idea!
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Old 05-24-12, 08:37 PM   #10
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I think this is all a scam, he is telling his partner that the bike broke so he can get a new one....... hence the no photos
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Old 05-24-12, 11:17 PM   #11
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Can't a guy get home first?
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Old 05-24-12, 11:22 PM   #12
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That's not a mechanical, that's structural.
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Old 05-24-12, 11:31 PM   #13
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Can't a guy get home first?
Holy carp.

Judging by the crank set this was not a high end frame so the monetary loss may be minimal and explains why the frame failed as it did.
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Old 05-24-12, 11:42 PM   #14
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It does not appear that the frame would be worth what it would cost to have it properly repaired. However, for a frame of that quality, I wouldn't be opposed to pulling the BB from the frame and finding a reasonablably talented welder, who should be capable of welding it back to gether again. It's nothing exotic that requires a "frame builder". Don't know where you live, but, look for someone with TIG experience with 16ga stainless tube. Chances are, they'll have the skill and experience required to successfully stick it back together. A slab of beer to the welder and a can of rattle paint, Bob's your uncle, Fanny's your aunt.
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Old 05-24-12, 11:44 PM   #15
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Is it fair to say, that based upon the rust in the photo, that the frame has been partially fractured for a while and finally failed altogether?
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Old 05-24-12, 11:59 PM   #16
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It's nothing exotic that requires a "frame builder". Don't know where you live, but, look for someone with TIG experience with 16ga stainless tube. Chances are, they'll have the skill and experience required to successfully stick it back together. A slab of beer to the welder and a can of rattle paint, Bob's your uncle, Fanny's your aunt.
I've been trained in TIG welding and bicycle frame building. I would not recommend this approach! Any TIG welder who will work for "a slab of beer" isn't to be trusted around bicycles. Tolerances are tight, bicycle tubing is relatively thin and it is extremely easy to have it distort (or burn through) unless you know exactly what you're doing. Tweak the alignment even a bit during welding and the bike will never ride straight again. Do the repair right or don't do it at all...
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Old 05-25-12, 12:06 AM   #17
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I've been trained in TIG welding and bicycle frame building. I would not recommend this approach! Any TIG welder who will work for "a slab of beer" isn't to be trusted around bicycles. Tolerances are tight, bicycle tubing is relatively thin and it is extremely easy to have it distort (or burn through) unless you know exactly what you're doing. Tweak the alignment even a bit during welding and the bike will never ride straight again. Do the repair right or don't do it at all...
This.
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Old 05-25-12, 12:10 AM   #18
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Can't a guy get home first?
Judging by that rust around the backside of the weld point, that frame's been cracked for a while at the weld, or had a faulty weld. What was the frame warranty? Lifetime or a fixed period?
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Old 05-25-12, 01:25 AM   #19
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I've been trained in TIG welding and bicycle frame building. I would not recommend this approach! Any TIG welder who will work for "a slab of beer" isn't to be trusted around bicycles. Tolerances are tight, bicycle tubing is relatively thin and it is extremely easy to have it distort (or burn through) unless you know exactly what you're doing. Tweak the alignment even a bit during welding and the bike will never ride straight again. Do the repair right or don't do it at all...
With all due respect: The bicycle industry's idea of "tight tolerances" are anything but. Come on. That frame will have been welded in a jig and possibly pop out with misalignments measured in hundrenths not ten thousandths. In any area with much food processing you're going to find plenty of welders who fuse 16ga double purged stainless tube all day long.

With regard to not trusting a welder who'll do a minor side project for beer. I've known welders who are responsible for welding the blades into turbines for military jet engines that spin at "classified" speeds who'll do a side project for "a slab of beer". Don't judge the welder by how much they want to charge. And I suspect that if you were to suggest to them that "any" bicycle is built to tight tolerances, they would struggle to keep a straight face. Just wonder over the frame builders forum and do a quick search for "cold setting". I think you might get a hit or two.

Anyhow. The frame doesn't appear to be worth investing even the time into.

Time would be better spent shopping Craig's or fleabay.
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Old 05-25-12, 05:43 AM   #20
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I'm a good welder and welding the frame back together wouldn't be that hard of a job. The problem is what happened to the seat stays when this let go. If it could have been caught when it was just a broken weld then I'd fix it. Now the frame is toast.
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Old 05-25-12, 10:58 AM   #21
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Was it making any noises?
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Old 05-25-12, 02:09 PM   #22
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Is it fair to say, that based upon the rust in the photo, that the frame has been partially fractured for a while and finally failed altogether?
From the rust in the photo, the joint looks like the joint was never cleaned properly or the bead (which is present) never bonded to the BB shell, and that might be due to improper protection from oxidation by inert gas (TIG = Tungsten Inert Gas). I suppose it's not a rare problem that in these 2nd world sweat shops, the actual factory has jury-rigged a few tanks of compressed argon or helium with who-knows what purity grade, and they may have a whole gang of folks pulling gas off the same tank which leads to insufficient pressure and flow around the weld site to form a barrier against oxygen penetration. Hence a weld that is already rusty and doesn't stick well.
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Old 05-25-12, 04:57 PM   #23
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Can't a guy get home first?
Some zip-ties, duct tape, and some super glue will get you good to go.
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Old 05-25-12, 06:54 PM   #24
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Some zip-ties, duct tape, and some super glue will get you good to go.
If you're going to affect such a repair. Do It Right! Use at least two hose clamps (jubilee clips).

Oh, and some JB weld:-)
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Old 05-28-12, 10:55 PM   #25
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Some zip-ties, duct tape, and some super glue will get you good to go.
Good one.

Going the new frame route.

The bike lasted some 10 years of regular use (25,000+ km) and more than fulfilled its purpose. My cycling ambitions have evolved since I bought this GT bike so it's finally time to upgrade.
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