Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 41
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Suggestions on upgrading/modernizing a Fuji S12-S ?

    First a little about myself. 54 year old male, 5’9” 275 lb but otherwise good health - getting back in cycling for weight loss and improve my overall fitness. Started getting back into cycling in 2010, but did very little in 2011 for various reasons. This spring I am making a renewed effort, but because of my current work schedule (6 days/week, 13 hours/day, night shift) I am only doing short 30 minute rides (6.4 miles) in the afternoon before going to work. This is working well to get my fanny reacquainted with Mr. Brooks and slowly start building up my strength without wearing myself out before work each day. In a few weeks I’ll be back to a normal day shift work schedule and plan to start building up to 60 minute rides each afternoon after work and a longer ride (2-3 hours) on Saturdays. My goal for this summer is to work myself up to be able to ride a metric century this fall.

    The bike I am riding is a Fuji S12-S I bought new back around 1981. In 2010, after almost 20 years of non-use, I cleaned and lubed it up, gave it a new (adjustable) stem, new 1-1/8” tires and got it running pretty good. I like the tighter freewheel I put on, but I don’t find myself using the 53 chain ring unless I have a pretty good tailwind. Right now I find myself using the 44 chain ring and the middle of the freewheel range most often. Right now I average around 13mph.

    The Fuji specs are:
    Triple crank (original) 53/44/36
    Freewheel (not original) 14-24, 6 speed
    seat tube 58cm
    top tube 57cm
    Seat and head tube angle 73deg
    wheelbase 100.7cm
    standover height 82.5 cm (32.5")
    Brooks saddle (circa mid ‘70s)
    clipless pedals

    My ultimate goal is a comfortable road bike that could do some light touring or handle a gravel trail – no road race sprints or cyclo-cross mud in my future.

    I considered buying a new 2012 Trek 2.1 Apex. I really like the SRAM double-tap shifting and the 50/34 & 11-32 gearing. The bike rode great on the nice smooth street behind the LBS, but I am hesitant about how the aluminum ride would feel on some of the rough NW Ohio backroads, even if I could go to 28mm tires.

    So I started to look at other options and ran across the Surly Cross-Check. Haven’t ridden one, but all the reviews sound great. However, I’m not wild about the built-up version because I really want to get away from the bar-ends and I’d like to get into SRAM or Shimano 105 level components if I’m going to start spending money. I even briefly considered buying a Cross-Check frame and a $899 cyclo-cross from BikesDirect as a donor bike. Build up a very sweet Surly, and sell the leftover frame.

    But - reality started sinking in and I started realizing that I probably don’t have $1500 worth of dissatisfaction with the Fuji. The frame is probably a size too big by todays standards, but it seems comfortable for me the way I have it set up now. So I have come around to the approach of upgrading the Fuji a little at a time. I realize that this path will ultimately be more expensive, but I can spend the $$$ a little at a time over the course of a year or two. If I eventually want something beyond the Fuji, I could always use my new components on a new frame in a few years.

    So – any thoughts for a logical progression for upgrading the Fuji? I’m not looking for a vintage restoration, I am looking for modern, efficient components on the Fuji’s comfortable steel frame.

    My initial wish list is to end up with 105 or SRAM shifters/derailleurs, a 50/34 compact crank, a 9 or10 speed cassette with fairly tight gearing (for the flat NW Ohio landscape), and new brakes that could accommodate some sort of fender eventually. I would like to stick with 28mm (or 1-1/8") road tires, but have the option of putting on some 32mm mixed-surface tires and a wider range cassette if I ever decide to tackle my ultimate goal of cycling the trail from Pittsburgh to Washington DC.

    Can't figure out how to post photos of my Fuji, but they can be seen here: https://picasaweb.google.com/1116721...509/MyFujiS12S

    Thanks for any suggestions or ideas!
    Last edited by mschreuder; 05-29-12 at 08:28 PM. Reason: photo problems

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    Posts
    25,346
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride what you got.

    When something breaks, that is the time to replace parts.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,472
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes the bd route has some other drawbacks...chek what wheel set comes with the bd and make sure it fits your needs / weight.

    I just ordered all the parts to build a cross heck from the frame up, using a wheel set I already have, and think I went cheap, and it cost more than ou think.

    I can't say I know. Uh about your current bike, but I have found from a cost perspective, that many older bikes don't make sense to upgrade ( exceptions may be if you have a bike coop near you and can get cheap parts and help changing them over.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
    Ride what you got.

    When something breaks, that is the time to replace parts.

    +1. This is the most sensible approach.


    I, too, like old steel bikes. I don't care if they are particularly "worth" upgrading. If they fit and are sound, then I put the parts I want on my bikes. Stuff can always be taken off and moved to a different frame. Why punish yourself with sub-par parts just because Joe Schmoe doesn't like your model of bike?

    Anyways, my thoughts on the progression of upgrading your ride:
    -if you have steel rims, consider going to aluminum. Parallel to this move, also consider switching to 700c, if it makes sense with your brakes.
    -What kind of brakes does that bike have? I'm at work, and my search results aren't being very helpful. If you have some old centerpulls or single-pivot sidepulls, then moving to double pivot sidepulls is a nice upgrade. To reiterate my point above, consider switching wheels to 700c at this time, so you can make sure that the brakes/rims work with each other.
    -If you plan on touring with the bike, maybe a triple crankset would be more comfortable. 50/39/30 (or lower, like 46/36/26) would be nice.
    -Racks and fenders. For me, these are not a "must have" on all of my bikes, but I do tend to put them on anything that I use for utility or for really long solo rides or commuting duty.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it doesn't make sense for you to go to 700c wheels, another option is to have your hubs re-laced to 27" aluminum rims. Or even go for a modern hub (i.e. with freehubs instead of a freewheel) laced to 27" aluminum rims. This way, you can have your wheel-builder dish the wheel for 8/9/10 speeds. There are still plenty of good 27" tires out there, and your dropout spacing can usually be moved out quite far, if necessary for a modern hub to fit.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am facing a similar dilemma. I have a 1985 Schwinn LeTour Luxe with 6 speed freewheel. I don't think you can upgrade to 9 or 10 speed cassette without spreading the frame apart.

    So rather than spend a ton trying to upgrade what is a nice, but not especially valuable vintage bike, right now I have my eye on the Salsa line of bikes. Not really sure, but the Casseroll seems to be just what I need, sort of a modern version of the LeTour Luxe. I also like the look and durability of the Vaya and the Fargo as well. I plan on test riding all 3 and making up my mind in the next few weeks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    I am facing a similar dilemma. I have a 1985 Schwinn LeTour Luxe with 6 speed freewheel. I don't think you can upgrade to 9 or 10 speed cassette without spreading the frame apart.

    So rather than spend a ton trying to upgrade what is a nice, but not especially valuable vintage bike, right now I have my eye on the Salsa line of bikes. Not really sure, but the Casseroll seems to be just what I need, sort of a modern version of the LeTour Luxe. I also like the look and durability of the Vaya and the Fargo as well. I plan on test riding all 3 and making up my mind in the next few weeks.

    I am a big fan of the Le Tours, but if you are wanting to upgrade from a 6s freewheel to 8/9/10 speed set up (meaning new ders, shifters, cassette, crankset, hubs) then, unless you're very fond of the Schwinn, I'd buy a whole new bike and have the Le Tour as a back-up, or make it serve some other purpose for you.

  8. #8
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfwerx View Post
    I am a big fan of the Le Tours, but if you are wanting to upgrade from a 6s freewheel to 8/9/10 speed set up (meaning new ders, shifters, cassette, crankset, hubs) then, unless you're very fond of the Schwinn, I'd buy a whole new bike and have the Le Tour as a back-up, or make it serve some other purpose for you.
    That is pretty much where I am heading. Just haven't decided yet whether to keep or sell the LeTour. We do have guests come visit from time to time, so it isn't the worst thing in the world to have a couple of extra bikes to lend out to out of town guests. And, in a few years, my son might be tall enough to ride it, and he really seems to like riding.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    ...so it isn't the worst thing in the world to have a couple of extra bikes. And, in a few years, my son might be tall enough to ride it, and he really seems to like riding.
    I wouldn't sell it at all. Use it as your "grocery getter" with a nice rack on it. Use it for tooling around the neighborhood with the family.
    Keep it in good shape (with your son helping you, that way it'll be a cool father/son thing.) and definitely pass it down to him, if able. It ought to last forever.

  10. #10
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your roads are like mine you'd miss the wider tires that the Fuji can run. I agree with you in that a Cross Check Complete just isn't my cup of tea. I ended up buying a C.C. frameset and building it up with a Rival Groupset. If you have downtube shifters then one upgrade would be bringing them up to the stem. Adding more gears/sti shifters becomes rather expensive as it becomes an almost complete changeout of the components.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The rims are aluminum and I haven't had any problems with them, so I was thinking of putting the 700cc wheels further down the list. The brakes are single pivot and work, but not especially well when wet. I was thinking to upgrade them when I go to new integrated shifters, but I would want to get something long enough to work with a 700cc rim eventually. The triple crank might not be a bad idea. I want a fairly tight range on the cassette for the flat riding I normally do, but a granny gear on the triple might be worthwhile if I take the bike somewhere with some hills.

    Anyone have any idea if the bottom bracket of a 1981 Fuji would be compatible with modern day cranksets? I'd like to replace the bottom bracket when I get a new crankset, but I don't know if a "standard" BB would fit this frame...

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Some photos of my Fuji


  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    Yes the bd route has some other drawbacks...chek what wheel set comes with the bd and make sure it fits your needs / weight.

    I just ordered all the parts to build a cross heck from the frame up, using a wheel set I already have, and think I went cheap, and it cost more than ou think.

    I can't say I know. Uh about your current bike, but I have found from a cost perspective, that many older bikes don't make sense to upgrade ( exceptions may be if you have a bike coop near you and can get cheap parts and help changing them over.

    I agree that in a financial sense it doesn't make sense to upgrade an old bike like this, I've no doubt that if I head down this path that 2-3 years from now I will have spent way more than the cost of a new bike now. But on the other hand, by carefully upgrading a little at a time with re-usable components, I will have a bike that does exactly what I need it to do - and I can always upgrade the frame anytime along the way if the mood strikes me. plus I don't have to plunk down a big pile of money now when I don't know exactly what I want...

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mschreuder View Post
    Wow, she looks pretty good.

    Well, if you're happy with the wheels (and cogs) for now, I would probably switch over the brakes to something that would allow a 700c conversion for when you're ready. I just recently did that very thing. Bought some Tektro R730 long reach brakes. They look fantastic (and not out-of-place on my old bike) and were a HUGE improvement over the old crappy single pivot sidepulls. Next up, salmon Kool Stops.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mschreuder View Post
    Anyone have any idea if the bottom bracket of a 1981 Fuji would be compatible with modern day cranksets? I'd like to replace the bottom bracket when I get a new crankset, but I don't know if a "standard" BB would fit this frame...
    You may have a better time with this over in the mechanics subforum.
    I doubt you would have a problem throwing a (for example) Shimano external bearing BB on there, but I don't know this first hand.

  16. #16
    Getting older and slower!
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Bowling Green, Kentucky
    My Bikes
    Trek Domane 6 series Project One, Trek Madone 6.9, Trek XO1
    Posts
    296
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used to ride a Fuji S12 and my brother still rides one. So I am very familiar with the bike and it was a nice ride, for it's day. But if you are trying to upgrade it to a modern ride, it will be an endless money pit. Kind of like trying to upgrade an early 80's car. Now if you want to "restore it" to its original condition, you will have a classic ride.

    I would recommend you buy that Trek 2.1, and keep the Fuji as is.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cychologist View Post
    ... it will be an endless money pit.

    How?


    I don't understand some people's theory that an old bike isn't worth riding. If the frame is sound and fits your body, then what is wrong with putting components you like on it? How is that different than ordering a QBP frame (that will also be "worthless" in 20 years) and building it up? If you like a frame, then it is worth riding. If all you are interested in is investment potential, then you're not going to ride it anyways, and that is a whole different conversation.

  18. #18
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfwerx View Post
    How?


    I don't understand some people's theory that an old bike isn't worth riding. If the frame is sound and fits your body, then what is wrong with putting components you like on it? How is that different than ordering a QBP frame (that will also be "worthless" in 20 years) and building it up? If you like a frame, then it is worth riding. If all you are interested in is investment potential, then you're not going to ride it anyways, and that is a whole different conversation.
    I don't think that was what he was saying. He seems to be echoing your advice. Ride the Fuji as is, upgrade parts only as needed. FWIW, this is pretty much the advice people have given me, including the good folks at my LBS about my vintage bikes. At one point, I was prepared to "modernize" my LeTour, and the owner of the bike shop advised me not to, despite the fact that he would have made hundreds more indulging me.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I just re-read his post, and I can't make out how he's mirroring my advice. It is very much the opposite, really.

    Your case with the Le Tour and the OP's seem to be slightly different. The OP is happy enough with the frame, and seems to understand that it's a more expensive route that he's taking, and is OK with that. In my mind, your situation is different because you want the complete new bike. You don't seem to especially care to keep the Le Tour, which makes it not as good an idea to upgrade it, rather just maintain it. Both routes are fine... the bottom line is this: Spend the money on what you want, or make a compromise. Compromises are not always bad.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfwerx View Post
    Well, I just re-read his post, and I can't make out how he's mirroring my advice. It is very much the opposite, really.

    Your case with the Le Tour and the OP's seem to be slightly different. The OP is happy enough with the frame, and seems to understand that it's a more expensive route that he's taking, and is OK with that. In my mind, your situation is different because you want the complete new bike. You don't seem to especially care to keep the Le Tour, which makes it not as good an idea to upgrade it, rather just maintain it. Both routes are fine... the bottom line is this: Spend the money on what you want, or make a compromise. Compromises are not always bad.

    That's pretty much where I'm coming from. Sure a shiny new Trek would be very nice, but at the level I'm riding right now I can't honestly say there is anything wrong with the Fuji. I think that some changes to gearing and brakes would make my ride a little more comfortable, but honestly I could probably keep on riding this bike just the way it is for several more years. If my riding increases over the next year or so (which I hope it will) I might decide to build a up a new bike around a Cross-Check (or something similar) using the components I have purchased and end up with a bike suited exactly to what I need. Who knows, maybe 5 years from now I'll be happily riding a '81 Fuji frame with $2k worth of components hanging on it. I've done crazier things...

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    FWIW, I am particularly fond of Japanese lugged steel bikes. I would rather have an early 80's CroMo Panasonic, Miyata, Fuji, etc. than almost any "comparable" current bike.



    **by "comparable", I mean something that would be considered the same level and/or purpose of bike. I don't mean price. A $500 bike from the 80's would be a hell of a lot different than a $500 bike from today.
    Last edited by Wolfwerx; 05-31-12 at 12:44 PM. Reason: more.

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well after mulling things over for a few weeks, I finally started down the upgrade path. The first step was taking the Fuji to my LBS for a tune-up to try to get rid of the noise in the bottom bracket. He pulled the bracket apart (first time since probably 1982) and found it pretty dry, but no scoring or damage. Lubed it up and put it back together. Turns out the rear wheel had three broken spokes and several more chewed up pretty good from overshifting at different points over the last 30 years. Talked about it with the bike shop owner and decided it was a good time to upgrade the wheelsssss. He had a set of new Bontrager wheels somebody traded up to off their Trek, so I went with those and a set of 28mm Continental Gatorskins. The existing freewheel was obviously of no use, so we went with an 8 speed cassette (12-23).

    IMG_4319.jpgIMG_4318.jpg

    It rides noticeably better now, very smooth and no annoying noise from the bottom bracket. However, the rear shifting is not that great with the old Suntour derailleur, and the brakes, although they reach the new rims, seem even more anemic than they were before

    SO -
    Placed an order with VeloOrange last night for their (very pretty and shiny) 48-36-24 triple crankset, a set of Tektro RR559 long reach brakes, and a set of Tektro RL340 Aero brake levers (with black hoods). I also ordered a Tiagra RD4600 GS rear derailleur, a Tiagra FD4603 front, and some Kool Stop Supra 2 salmon brake pads from Amazon. Going to stick with bar end shifters for now, hopefully the old ones I have will work with the new derailleurs since I am sticking with friction shifting for now. Everything should be here by the end of the week, so hopefully I can get it all put together and out for a long ride by the weekend!

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My Bikes
    '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mschreuder View Post
    Placed an order with VeloOrange last night for their (very pretty and shiny) 48-36-24 triple crankset, a set of Tektro RR559 long reach brakes, and a set of Tektro RL340 Aero brake levers (with black hoods). I also ordered a Tiagra RD4600 GS rear derailleur, a Tiagra FD4603 front, and some Kool Stop Supra 2 salmon brake pads from Amazon. Going to stick with bar end shifters for now, hopefully the old ones I have will work with the new derailleurs since I am sticking with friction shifting for now. Everything should be here by the end of the week, so hopefully I can get it all put together and out for a long ride by the weekend!

    Good luck!

    FWIW: I have all of those parts except that crankset, and they all work quite nicely. You should be pleased with what it will do for your Fuji.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Central PA
    My Bikes
    Old Fuji road,Cirrus Sport
    Posts
    291
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm in the same boat. I have an old Fuji steel frame given to me by a good freind. I'm gonna rebuild her. I'm using Sora brakes and new Shimano MTB derailers. Gonna use the down tube shifters. And keep the friction as well. Probably keep the original wheelset for now. Can't afford new wheels. And I'm stuck at 126mm in the back. Not a lot of choices in that size anyway. Looking to go 7 speed freewheel, 12 to 32. I live in Central PA so hills are a fact of life. So gotta use some serious gears. Not sure on what cranks to use. I have a standard set of Bontraegers. But I can only get down to 38 on that. Not sure yet what I'll do. This is gonna be a budget build.

    Mark Shuman

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Near Toledo Ohio
    My Bikes
    1981 Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well the derailleurs showed up today, mounted and adjusted the rear with no problem - looks like it works just fine with the old bar end shifters. The front derailleur will take a little more work,. The original front derailleur had a stop for the cable jacket - something for the derailleur to pull against when shifting. It looks like the Tiagra front is assuming that the cable comes from below the bottom bracket or something. Going to have to do a little research on the web to educate myself a little on my options - gotta believe there is some sort of cable stop out there that does what I need. In the meantime, the original front still works fine with the old crank. The new VO crank and brakes are supposed to be delivered on Thursday, so maybe that morning I can get to the LBS get what I need to set up the front crank and derailleur all at once.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •