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  1. #1
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    Random mumblings from DntWorryB.Happy

    Now that i have my bike, and theres no "random thoughts" thread in this section, i guess i'll update this one periodically.


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    Don't see a thread with the requirements for help, so i'll post as much as i can to assist ya'll.

    Im 5 ft 7 201 pounds 21 years old, yeah, it's not pretty.

    I measured myself with shoes, flat footed theres 31.5 inches from the ground to my man parts. Tip toes adds another 5 inches.

    Why i need help.

    I know nothing about bikes, road them when i was younger, but never for fitness/commuting.I don't know why some bikes are more expensive than others, i didnt know what Shimano was until i googled I want to nip this weight gain in the bud before i spiral out of control, of course im gonna manage my diet better. Im not a good runner, and id love to explore using a bike while helping my situation.

    Budget.
    I know cheap and good quality shouldnt be in the same sentence, but im gonna try anyway.
    450 give or take is my budget willing to add a bit more if need be, but i'd like to keep it within that range, although its not set in stone.

    What are my plans/goals
    I plan on traveling to the gym, roughly 10 miles away according to googlemaps.
    More than likely ill do that 4 times a week.Other three days i'll be cycling, miles? not sure, depends on how i feel.

    Road conditions.
    Roads in my city arent the greatest i worry about car tires while driving on all those bumps, so bike tires i'll have anxiety issues when im out . I need something thats durable and wont get a flat easily. (I'll even consider specialized tires if they're not bank breakers).There arent many bike lanes here, about 1/4 of my gym trip has a bike lane, rest will be side walks, and im positive they'll have glass on them. And curbs, not all have a ramp, so i'll have to slow down and hop them. with those skinny tires i see this potentially being a major issue?

    What type of bike i want.
    Wouldnt mind a road bike with a flat bar, but they seem hard to come by, so its not a requirement.I want it to be relatively fast, light, and strong enough to take my weight, plus the few extra pounds i'll have in my backpack (maintenance gear) etc.

    One thing that is a requirement
    My funds are on paypal, so the site i buy from has to accept paypal, i know this throws a wrench in the plan, but i don't have any other options.
    I was looking here http://www.bikesdirect.com/ , but as i said before, i know nothing about these types of bikes and why others are better and what to look for.

    Thanks for reading.
    Last edited by DntWorryB.Happy; 07-05-12 at 07:21 PM.

  2. #2
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    Look for a non-suspension hybrid style with V or disc brakes and clearance for wider tyres.
    Rack and fender fittings give you all weather/utility use. Every errand done on a bike saves you money and adds to the exercise.
    A more sporty all-rounder style is cyclo-cross but you cant get cheap ones. Same goes for touring bikes.
    Almost every brand does a flatbar roadbike/rigid hybrid. There are variation in the brake style, tyre clearance and gearing.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the quick response MW

    I understand V brakes, the rest, seems like chinese and i only speak english

  4. #4
    Bicycle Commuter Bluish Green's Avatar
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    Good luck, I hope you find a great bike that fits you and you enjoy riding.

    I have switched to commuting to work by bike, and it is really great exercise. Before the bicycle commuting, I was working the treadmill at the gym, but the bicycling is a better workout for me, much lower impact on my knees, and something I usually enjoy rather than dread. Instead of abandoning my gym membership, what I do now is work upper body strength a couple of times a week at the gym (and bike there too). The bicycle commuting is the main exercise, though. And the pounds are dropping off of me. My commute is 6 miles each way, and the gym is only 1.5 miles.

    I'm not a bicycle expert, but you will get lots of advice on this forum. One thing I have on my bike that I like is "puncture-resistant" tires. They are Kenda tires with "Iron Cap", kind of like a kevlar reinforcement. Not 100% puncture proof, but supposed to be helpful. No problems yet.

    Good luck, and be safe when riding.

  5. #5
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    Thanks, was looking into new tires a week ago. Best thing i THINK i came across were Armadilo tires? they cost a pretty penny, but i guess they're quality?

  6. #6
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    What you are searching for is commonly called a hybrid bike. It will have straight handle bars, wide tires, but not the shocks (and expense) of a mountain bike.
    Since you will be riding pavement, you should go with tires with tread that is more "smooth" than "rough". There are lots of choices for hybrid bikes, and most of the manufacturers should have an entry level bike at or near your price range. Here is an example from Trek, a popular and well regarded brand.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...ness/fx/7_2_fx#

    Best advice I can give is to buy from a local bike shop (LBS) with a good reputation for service and repairs. They will be your ally in your cycling journey.
    Not sure how you will be best able to convert your paypal money into something the LBS will accept, but hopefully there are others who can give advice there.

    Go to a few bike shops, test ride several bikes, and it should become obvious which shop and which bike is right for you.

  7. #7
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    Your weight really isn't a big issue on your bike choice, your riding style is. If you plan to jump curbs to ride the sidewalk (which I wouldn't suggest - sidewalks are for walking but that's another topic), I would go for an MTB. Were it not for the PP caveat, I'd say used MTB from the early '90s. The problem with going BikesDirect is that you need to know something about bikes to assemble, adjust and maintain it once the box arrives. I'd think something around a 17" frame like this if you go the BD route: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._cliff4700.htm.
    Then swap out the tires for slicks or semi-slicks with kevlar belts to help prevent flatting (and keeping them near the top end of their recommended inflation will help with that as well).

  8. #8
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    Clarification, i dont plan on jumping curbs like a mad man, too old for that!

    I will slow down and hop up.

    MTBs are considerably slower than road bikes? don't think i want to sacrifice speed

    I know side walks are for walking,but the streets without bike lanes are narrow, and i don't want to get ran over, people here will keep going and leave you injured.

    That Trek is a sexy bike, i shall investigate it.

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  10. #10
    working on progress treebound's Avatar
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    My standard replies:

    1. Visit a shop in person if you can and sit on as many bikes as you can until you get a better feel for what feels good to you. Then once you're down to two or three that you think you like, ask the staff if you can put one of the bikes on a trainer so you can see how the bike feels and so you can get a sense of what it will be like riding it. All the while keep in mind that as you get more comfortable you might find your taste in bikes will change, some do and some don't so just keep it in mind.

    2. Save some of your budget for a helmet, gloves, shoes, lights and flasher, tire pump for home, some sort of pump or CO2 or both to carry on the bike, tube patch kit and tire levers, and maybe a multi-tool for basic repairs and adjustments.

    3. If you are mechanically inclined then you can sometimes save a lot by buying a used bike, or can not save money but get a better bike used than the same money will get you in a new bike.

    4. There are too many options and comparable choices that easily overwhelm a new or returning rider. Just pick a decent brand and pick out a couple options, life will be less stressfull and in the end it will probably be just fine regardless of what you get.

    "That you ride" is more important than "what you ride" .

    Keep us posted, and enjoy the ride.

    ps, just looked at some of your choices and at the shop's location, based on that I'd probably avoid a singlespeed bike unless you really want one, and I'd include a good lock setup and spend some web time watching proper locking methods. Be a real shame to get a new bike and have it gone in 60 seconds.
    Hope I helped some.
    Last edited by treebound; 06-13-12 at 07:56 PM.
    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
    Life happens, don't be a spectator.

  11. #11
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    All right thanks, ill see if i can visit a shop some time this week.

    And i posted the single speed by accident, was trying to weed those out. I searched for everything within my budget on their site, it slipped thru

    Still think that Trek FX2 is the sexiest bike ive seen.

    Just remembered i can request a check from paypal. So that requirement is out the window.

  12. #12
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    +1 to finding a good bike shop. $450 will get you a decent starter bike. Don't remember what I paid for my Trek 7.2FX, but it wasn't far from that.
    Last edited by CommuteCommando; 06-13-12 at 10:40 PM.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  13. #13
    Senior Member libero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DntWorryB.Happy View Post
    D


    What are my plans/goals
    I plan on traveling to the gym, roughly 10 miles away according to googlemaps.
    More than likely ill do that 4 times a week.Other three days i'll be cycling, miles? not sure, depends on how i feel.
    Ok - don't forget your longer term goals:
    - stick with it
    - upgrade the bike
    - get cycle gear and clothing
    - learn to maintain the bike and gear
    - do longer rides
    - do social rides
    (examples, make your own list your own way).

    So it's important not to get deterred or bummed out from the beginning. Some things that could become a downer: bike gets stolen; bike's not comfortable over distances; feel like you can't afford it; feel like you can't keep up with somebody; cycling makes you feel like eating more.

    So keep these risks in mind and try to manage them. I just threw that last one in there because it could happen, your situation may differ.

    Putting your budget in there is good but there are some items to plan for other than the bike itself (gear, clothing, eventual replacement parts like tires). So these are good to plan ahead for.

  14. #14
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    Yeah security will be a big concern. Guess i should have said it in the first post.

    But that will always be separate, the budget i listed is for bike online, i'll take care of the bike lock and gear

  15. #15
    working on progress treebound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DntWorryB.Happy View Post
    ...
    Still think that Trek FX2 is the sexiest bike ive seen.
    ....

    I think you just answered your own question.
    Enjoy your new bike. Post a ride report when you get it.

    I used to work with a guy who got an FX model for his 10 mile commute, he really liked that bike and I assume he still does.
    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
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  16. #16
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    LOL, wouldnt say i made my choice, but maaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan im leaning towards that sexy beast.

    Is the 7.2FX the best choice for me? is everyone in agreement.

    Im a noob here, i don't wanna have buyers remorse lol.

    The price of this thing and my health rapidly changing , i WILL be sticking with this, even if i dont go to the gym as much as i planned i WILL get out and ride.

  17. #17
    Senior Member goldfinch's Avatar
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    The Trek FX series is well liked here. If you can stretch a bit the FX 7.3 has better components. But for the price the FX 7.2 is good.

  18. #18
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    There is a good chance that riding on sidewalks at your age is illegal where you live. It can also be very dangerous for pedestrians. Injure one and you could be in a world of hurt.

  19. #19
    Senior Member volosong's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBuff View Post
    What you are searching for is commonly called a hybrid bike. It will have straight handle bars, wide tires, but not the shocks (and expense) of a mountain bike...

    Best advice I can give is to buy from a local bike shop (LBS) with a good reputation for service and repairs. They will be your ally in your cycling journey...

    Go to a few bike shops, test ride several bikes
    , and it should become obvious which shop and which bike is right for you.
    Listen to this guy! Especially the bolded type. Bikesdirect are good ... in fact a very good value, but it is only for people who know exactly what they want, what size they need, and who can do minimal mechanical adjustments themselves. You don't sound like you are there yet.

    Your town is large enough to have a bunch of bike shops. Visit several this weekend. Find a sales rep who will take you seriously, explain to him or her your wants, needs, and budget and he or she will steer you to the most appropriate bike. As mentioned, set aside enough for a helmet, flashing rear light, (yes, even in daytime), gloves, underseat bag to hold tire irons and a spare tube, a frame pump and another pump for home use. (You may be able to negotiate to have these "thrown into" the bike purchase.) Then, you'll be set. In time, you can add a rear rack to haul your stuff as you ride.

    Forget the sidewalk. Just stick to the right side of the roadways. If you must "hop curbs", come to a complete stop, put your feet on the ground, and lift your bike over the curb. Don't ride off or hop onto curbs. That is a sure way to trash your bike.

    Good luck in your quest.
    Deut 6:5

    ---

    "Ha ha! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders - The most famous of which is 'never get involved in a land war in Asia'".
    - Vizzini during his "battle of wits" with the Man in Black

  20. #20
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    Man, ive been driving since 18, ive seen countless times how horrible the drivers are in Memphis.

    Riding in a bike lane i'll be paranoid, riding on the side of the road without a bike line im positive someone will run me over and claim it was my fault.

    YES people in this city are that low down.

    Sigh, i'll visit some shops this weekend.

    2-3 weeks to finally make the purchase, thanks for the help. I appreciate it.

  21. #21
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by treebound View Post
    There are too many options and comparable choices that easily overwhelm a new or returning rider. Just pick a decent brand and pick out a couple options, life will be less stressfull and in the end it will probably be just fine regardless of what you get.

    "That you ride" is more important than "what you ride" .

    +1 to the whole post, but +1000 to this part in particular.


    To the OP, go sit on some bikes and take 'em for a spin. That will tell you far more than a bunch of internet people can.
    Don't get paralyzed by the seemingly endless choices. For one thing, you'd probably be surprised at how many brands are rolling out of the same factory in Taiwan. Especially at your price-point. Just get something that will keep you riding. You'll become educated in time, and can fine-tune things as you go. If you end up really racking up some miles and loving it, you will probably find yourself wanting a drop-bar road bike to zoom down the road, so you may likely find your tastes changing over time.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
    The Trek FX series is well liked here. If you can stretch a bit the FX 7.3 has better components. But for the price the FX 7.2 is good.
    Ha! just looked at the prices of those. A stretch to me is standing on your tip toes to reach something. This type of stretch is like going to an advanced yoga class

    That's a little too steep for my blood.


    Anywhoo. once again thanks everyone, i'll bump this thread on the weekend once i test some bikes out.

  24. #24
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    Okay okay, i have more questions hahaha


    Im looking at the comparison between the Trek FX 7.2 and 7.1

    The difference that matters to me (with my limited knowledge) that i noticed are the tires.

    7.1 comes with Bontrager H2
    7.2 comes with these http://bikeline.com/product/bontrage...0c-76308-1.htm


    7.1 being 80 bucks cheaper, should i opt for that and get the Specialized Armadillo tires? saw a review and out of all of the "puncture resistant tires" it was the only one to not get a flat.

    Ive become OCD like im researching PC parts

    Good news is the bike shop (which is only 5 miles away) has both 7.1 and 7.2

    Didnt google the distance till a few minutes ago and was surprised how close it was, thought all of the bike shops were in the "good" parts of town

  25. #25
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    I think the 7.2 is worth the extra money. With a 8 speed you're getting a Shimano freehub rear axle plus much better derailleurs. The 7.1 appears to be a freewheel axle and I've heard posters complain about the inability to find quality replacements. I was talking to the Trek rep for Illinois and Missouri about tires and he was really hyping the new Bontrager Tires. I have H4 plus's on a bike with over 4000 miles and the only thing I dislike about them is the weight (heavy) and price ($50 ea.) He said the new tires are much lighter and still give the kind of life I'm getting. (They're still pricy.)

    I think the $80 will pay itself back if you put a lot of miles on this. If you see yourself getting a different bike down the road then maybe not.

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