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-   -   Improving through resistance (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/826336-improving-through-resistance.html)

LAE 06-19-12 03:49 AM

Improving through resistance
 
Anyone find weightlifting helping with their cycling? Any benefits noticed?

I've tried squats, deadlifts etc but to be honest I just end up pulling a muscle (usually hamstring), I've been wondering if it's worth it at all.

I've stopped most if not all my upper body stuff but I'll resume that tonight becauae I'm starting to feel a little squishy :(

mkadam68 06-19-12 09:35 AM

Weight lifting does help cycling. Specifically, power output (strength & explosiveness).

From my own research on the matter...
  • Train with high weight, low reps to maximize strength gains. Muscular endurance is increased through your cycling, so you don't need to train that with weights.
  • Young people only need to lift in the off-season, but once the season gets underway, they can curtail it. Older folks (middle-age) should train with weights all year long due to aging's negative effects on musculature.
  • Last, it is also possible to replicate weight lifting while on the bike using big gears, low cadence and an occasional hill or two.
  • Don't worry too much about upper body weight training. You'll get results for that just by nature of moving the weights around setting up for your lower body exercises.

CliftonGK1 06-19-12 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mkadam68 (Post 14376645)
Weight lifting does help cycling. Specifically, power output (strength & explosiveness).

From my own research on the matter...
  • Train with high weight, low reps to maximize strength gains. Muscular endurance is increased through your cycling, so you don't need to train that with weights.
  • Young people only need to lift in the off-season, but once the season gets underway, they can curtail it. Older folks (middle-age) should train with weights all year long due to aging's negative effects on musculature.
  • Last, it is also possible to replicate weight lifting while on the bike using big gears, low cadence and an occasional hill or two.
  • Don't worry too much about upper body weight training. You'll get results for that just by nature of moving the weights around setting up for your lower body exercises.

Yes to everything above, with my own caveat about upper-body strength training:
I've found upper-body training to be beneficial in certain circumstances, such as my off-road hill climbing on my singlespeed CX bike. With a stronger upper body, I can reef on the handlebars like an angry gorilla and mash my way up many more hills than last season.
While you're doing off-bike strength training, don't ignore your core! Throw some planks, side planks, and hanging leg lifts in there to keep your midsection strong. A strong core is another key element to strong climbing.

LAE 06-19-12 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mkadam68 (Post 14376645)
Weight lifting does help cycling. Specifically, power output (strength & explosiveness).

From my own research on the matter...
  • Train with high weight, low reps to maximize strength gains. Muscular endurance is increased through your cycling, so you don't need to train that with weights.
  • Young people only need to lift in the off-season, but once the season gets underway, they can curtail it. Older folks (middle-age) should train with weights all year long due to aging's negative effects on musculature.
  • Last, it is also possible to replicate weight lifting while on the bike using big gears, low cadence and an occasional hill or two.
  • Don't worry too much about upper body weight training. You'll get results for that just by nature of moving the weights around setting up for your lower body exercises.

Thanks for that,

Dont get me wrong im not new to weightlifting, ive been doing it for many years (since 16 i think :S). I've always had a problem with pulling my hamstring mostly on the left leg but it became significantly more frequent if i was cycling during that period so i never really got to see the benefit on the bike first hand so to speak hence the question.

Generally on my legs i used to do exactly that, heavy weight low reps, but with that i did notice more pulls. I do try power up the hills and usually throw it on the big gear when possible, oddly when i get tired on the bike i notice my left hip abductor tends to twinge a little bit so i am weary of that, ive noticed it before when deep into a squat.

Thanks for the info though!

Quote:

Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 (Post 14377127)
Yes to everything above, with my own caveat about upper-body strength training:
I've found upper-body training to be beneficial in certain circumstances, such as my off-road hill climbing on my singlespeed CX bike. With a stronger upper body, I can reef on the handlebars like an angry gorilla and mash my way up many more hills than last season.
While you're doing off-bike strength training, don't ignore your core! Throw some planks, side planks, and hanging leg lifts in there to keep your midsection strong. A strong core is another key element to strong climbing.

admittedly I do neglect the midsection, I need to work on that a bit more. The first time i rode a bike a long distance i felt it in the triceps....they were not nice the following morning. The neck wasnt too free moving either haha


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