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  1. #1
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    Thinking of getting new wheels

    Hi all-

    My Giant Defy has about 600 miles now and has helped me drop from 226 to 215 pounds since I purchased it in the Spring. Two weeks ago, the nipple of a spoke came loose during a ride and I took the wheel back to my LBS who replaced the spoke and nipple for me. Nonetheless, the wheel has so much lateral flex, that it will sometimes hit the brake pad while I'm hammering up hills. Although I have been trying to wear out these wheels while I save up for something more high end from my LBS, I'm thinking of pulling the trigger on some less expensive, yet stronger wheels off an online retailer now for some peace of mind. After some research, I have found the Fulcrum line to be well-praised, and well-priced. Is it worth it to purchase some wheels to hammer on now while I am still working on my weight, or should I continue on these current wheels and accept the flex as a side-effect of my size?

    These are the wheels I am considering: http://www.probikekit.com/us/compone...-wheelset.html

    Thanks in advance

    -Jacob

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    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
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    If you are 215, then you need to find someone who can work with wheels. There is no reason they can't true your stock wheels and expect them to last at that weight.

  3. #3
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    I agree with vesteroid. No reason those wheels cant carry you for many miles. I bought my Roubaix at 320lbs and have over 3000 miles on the stock Aksieum (sp?) in two years - trouble free. I suspect I finally have a loose spoke but zero complaints on these 'stock' wheels.
    Last edited by magohn; 07-15-12 at 10:31 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    I have no reason to think the wheels aren't true, mostly just the lateral flex and that one loose spoke. Perhaps I'll write off the loose spoke to chance and continue hammering down on them for now. Thanks for the input guys.

    It seems like all the guys on the board immediately upgrade their wheels. I keep thinking I'm missing out on something.

  5. #5
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    If you want another set of wheels, those Fulcrum 7's are great for that price. I've been riding on Fulcrum 7's for nearly 2 years now. I weight about 5 pounds less than you and they seem to hold up very well. I just replaced the bearings in the rear wheel after about 2500 miles, front wheel bearings are still good. I believe they have a steel freehub, which is a good thing if you use a Shimano cassette. I just discovered how Shimano cassettes can cause notches to develop in aluminum freehubs.

  6. #6
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adefeatedman View Post
    It seems like all the guys on the board immediately upgrade their wheels. I keep thinking I'm missing out on something.
    I noticed that too when i started out. You may also notice that many of those guys arent around anymore (the guys i knew at least). I noticed a pattern of spending $ on 'upgrades' took precedence to actually riding the bike. A wise member told me "ride what you have and when/if it completely falls apart fix/replace it". Until then, ride like the wind.

  7. #7
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kh6idf View Post
    If you want another set of wheels, those Fulcrum 7's are great for that price. I've been riding on Fulcrum 7's for nearly 2 years now. I weight about 5 pounds less than you and they seem to hold up very well. I just replaced the bearings in the rear wheel after about 2500 miles, front wheel bearings are still good. I believe they have a steel freehub, which is a good thing if you use a Shimano cassette. I just discovered how Shimano cassettes can cause notches to develop in aluminum freehubs.
    Thanks for the input. If I do pull the trigger, I think it will be those wheels. I just emailed a guy who has these wheels as take-offs from a Cervelo. If he is willing to cut me a good deal, I might just get em anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by magohn View Post
    I noticed that too when i started out. You may also notice that many of those guys arent around anymore (the guys i knew at least). I noticed a pattern of spending $ on 'upgrades' took precedenc to actually riding the bike. A member told me "ride what you have and when/if it completely falls apart fix/replace it". Until then, tide like the wind.
    I am actually a car guy and I generally am of the proposition of waiting for something to break, and upgrading then. Unfortunately, my old Camaro breaks quite often. I guess now that my rides are extending to 20-30 miles, I want my bike to be in tip-top shape. I just don't have faith in these wheels considering how much they bend and lean about. Nonetheless, I suppose you are right. Even if something does happen, I'll wait until then. Unless of course I come across a great deal.

  8. #8
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    I don't see you mention which Defy you have, or, which wheels it came with. The 2 and 3 at least, both have generic 32h rims and stainless 14ga spokes. The 1, 28h with DT spokes.

    If properly tensioned, there is little reason the stock wheels shouldn't be adequately stiff. You may still experience both brake rub and chainstay rub as a consequence of not just rim deflection, but, also frame flex. At 250lbs I have to focus on not swaying excessively while standing, or I certainly experience both issues, on 32h and 36h V section rims.

    If you want to upgrade lateral stiffness in your wheels there are basically four areas that can be addressed singularly or in combination:

    Number of spokes, rim stiffness through increased cross section, spoke gauge and subsequent elongation, spoke angle through combination of rim cross sectional depth, hub flange diameter and flange width. Some of these obviously come at the expense of weight, others cost.

    Without knowing what you're running right now, it's hard to tell you if the Fulcrum 7's would be an improvement. But, I suspect they would be similiar to other 32h wheels laced to a 30mm rim. They're a 24 spoke rear. Albeit, with their 2:1 spoking you get 16 spokes on the drive side. So, basically the same as any other 32h rear, laced to a 30mm rim. Not personally familiar with them, however.

    If you want laterally stiff look for a a deep v rim, paired to a hub with reasonably wide flange spacing and laced with as heavy a drive side spoke as you're comfortable with in a realatively high spoke count.
    Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
    I don't see you mention which Defy you have, or, which wheels it came with. The 2 and 3 at least, both have generic 32h rims and stainless 14ga spokes. The 1, 28h with DT spokes.

    If properly tensioned, there is little reason the stock wheels shouldn't be adequately stiff. You may still experience both brake rub and chainstay rub as a consequence of not just rim deflection, but, also frame flex. At 250lbs I have to focus on not swaying excessively while standing, or I certainly experience both issues, on 32h and 36h V section rims.

    If you want to upgrade lateral stiffness in your wheels there are basically four areas that can be addressed singularly or in combination:

    Number of spokes, rim stiffness through increased cross section, spoke gauge and subsequent elongation, spoke angle through combination of rim cross sectional depth, hub flange diameter and flange width. Some of these obviously come at the expense of weight, others cost.

    Without knowing what you're running right now, it's hard to tell you if the Fulcrum 7's would be an improvement. But, I suspect they would be similiar to other 32h wheels laced to a 30mm rim. They're a 24 spoke rear. Albeit, with their 2:1 spoking you get 16 spokes on the drive side. So, basically the same as any other 32h rear, laced to a 30mm rim. Not personally familiar with them, however.

    If you want laterally stiff look for a a deep v rim, paired to a hub with reasonably wide flange spacing and laced with as heavy a drive side spoke as you're comfortable with in a realatively high spoke count.
    That's some great info right there. Thanks for that! And I actually have the Defy 1 which does have the 28h. The wheels on my fixie are deep-V and are what I have been used to. I can really hammer on that bike and those things don't give one bit as far as I can tell. I am used to that, and anything less feels as if something is amiss. If the wheelset on the bike now are that good, I think its time to save up for some fancy deep-V carbon clinchers or something. I think I am just used to that super stiff wheelset from my old bike.

  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I am one of those guys that says upgrade immediately and I'm still around.

    Reason being it's senseless to keep fighting with wheels that are a waste of time and effort trying to keep true. I had several stock wheels on Trek bikes, Bontrager Race, Race light and Select. All were a pain in the arse to keep true and none lasted more than 2000 miles. Plus I could rub the brakes in a seated hard effort so I know what the OP is talking about. My rec's are after a few years of wasted time on Stock wheels.

    I actually build a set of V's for any new bike I purchase. No sense in wasting time. Yeah, I could get a free replacement from the shop under warranty but why, just more wasted time and fighting.

    Gina had Race Lites on her carbon roadie ($3000 model so not like a cheapie ). She rode them for a few years then I replaced with a deep V. I told her if she thought it was too heavy that I'd build a different rim onto the DA hub. She said heck no, this wheel was stiff and responsive compared to the wimpy low spoke count wheel she had been riding.

  11. #11
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    I am one of those guys that says upgrade immediately and I'm still around.
    You're the exception Mr B. I think you will outride us all

  12. #12
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magohn View Post
    You're the exception Mr B. I think you will outride us all
    It's those darn heavy Deep V's

  13. #13
    Senior Member Big Pete 1982's Avatar
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    Well if they are that bad that they flex enough to rub the brakes, then you may as well get something new. I don't know much about wheels, but I started riding on my Mavic Aksium's at around 300 pounds and have ridden 2000 miles and dropped to 245 pounds on them. I've never had any issues except 1 broken spoke, but that was due to a hard impact at high speed.

  14. #14
    Senior Member redvespablur's Avatar
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    I had a well made pair of Open Pros laced to centaur hub 32H- but too much lateral flex when standing up. I'm a big guy and climbing sucks enough without losing power to rubbing. I bought a used set of Campy Zondas that solved my problem for 200 - a great upgrade for me.

    Fulcrum's are heavy and sturdy and often described as bomb proof in reviews - and pretty cheap as a take off - I expect you will pay 150 or less?

    Good campy hubs that will roll and roll. I think its a worthy upgrade. Then you have extra wheel set to compulsively build another bike around as a secret project - just saying.
    Last edited by redvespablur; 07-17-12 at 06:27 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member elcruxio's Avatar
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    Why have less spokes when you can have more...
    Just built myself a pair of wheels with Mavic CXP 33 as rims and hope pro 3 mono hubs. 28 front 32 rear 3 cross. Absolutely no flexing in any direction and so far they have stayed true. Ok, they have been ridden for only like 100 miles, but I have tried to bombard the absolute sh*t out of them. Just to test them you know... And I weigh 210 pounds.

    CXP 33 is a little heavy (pretty relative actually) but then again, we are big people. What's a 100 grams here or there. I bet no one here will notice an extra 100 grams in their wheels.

  16. #16
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    Ah I missed this thread for a while, I missed the last few responses. I actually angled my brake slightly to the side to allow the flex in the side I tend to peddle harder on, and that has avoided the rubbing and satisfied me for now.

    I have been quite busy with the bar exam coming up next week to really search around. I had one person suggest a set of chinese carbon fiber deep-V clinchers that could be had for cheap and weigh much less than the Fulcrums I was looking at. I don't know whether I'm ready for that kind of risk without a warranty or anything, but its an idea. I'd love to build my own set, but I don't have a truing stand yet (although I plan on picking one up next week or so) and don't really know what I'm doing.

  17. #17
    Senior Member elcruxio's Avatar
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    Building wheels is not difficult. Truing stand, tensionmeter, spoke wrench and a dishing tool(optional)

    It's lots of fun, and satisfying when you're finished. Just read the book art of wheelbuilding and lots of articles in the internet. And start simple (32 spoke 3x cross non butted or single butted 2,1.8,2mm, brass nipple, cxp33 rim). I'm recommending the mavic because it's strong and eyletted.

    Everything special like bladed spokes or aluminum nipples makes the build more difficult. Start with basics and over time you can make your own carbon wheels. Or at least verify the quality of commercial wheelsets and fix if necessary.

  18. #18
    Senior Member mprelaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magohn View Post
    I agree with vesteroid. No reason those wheels cant carry you for many miles. I bought my Roubaix at 320lbs and have over 3000 miles on the stock Aksieum (sp?) in two years - trouble free. I suspect I finally have a loose spoke but zero complaints on these 'stock' wheels.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Pete 1982 View Post
    Well if they are that bad that they flex enough to rub the brakes, then you may as well get something new. I don't know much about wheels, but I started riding on my Mavic Aksium's at around 300 pounds and have ridden 2000 miles and dropped to 245 pounds on them. I've never had any issues except 1 broken spoke, but that was due to a hard impact at high speed.
    I'm not a wheel expert (far from it) but I believe that Aksiums are a little better than the entry-level grade wheels you get on most brands of bikes of that level.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    I'd get the rear wheel PROPERLY tensioned and see how that works out before dropping a bunch of $ on new wheels.

  20. #20
    Senior Member adefeatedman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
    Building wheels is not difficult. Truing stand, tensionmeter, spoke wrench and a dishing tool(optional)

    It's lots of fun, and satisfying when you're finished. Just read the book art of wheelbuilding and lots of articles in the internet. And start simple (32 spoke 3x cross non butted or single butted 2,1.8,2mm, brass nipple, cxp33 rim). I'm recommending the mavic because it's strong and eyletted.

    Everything special like bladed spokes or aluminum nipples makes the build more difficult. Start with basics and over time you can make your own carbon wheels. Or at least verify the quality of commercial wheelsets and fix if necessary.
    Yeah, the wheels are turning in my head. It's not like a spare set of wheels would ever be a complete waste as things happen. I do enjoy building little projects like this. Maybe a 32 spoke wheel with a quality hub is what I'm looking for. Heavier than my current wheels, but definitely going to be stronger and more reliable.

    I am going to purchase that book now, thanks!

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