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  1. #1
    Senior Member Allen55's Avatar
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    Road bikes and clydes...

    Was thinking today as I was getting some things done on the bike and was wondering if I could ride a real road bike at my size? 5-7 294 at the moment and am riding my Trek 7000 hybrid. I was wondering just what kind of a difference a road bike would make in my rides. Would it be worth selling the hybrid and going with a road bike? Could I even find one that I could ride at my size? Should I just wait tip im at my goal weight of 190? Got any thoughts on the matter?

    It's a conundrum, I tell ya!
    Allen
    Riding since 09-16-2011
    TREK 7000

  2. #2
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Yes. You could find a road bike for you. I've been riding mine since 320 lbs. about 5-6 years ago. The only issue for us heavier riders is making sure we have the right wheels that will support us and not be constantly going out of true or cracking spoke holes.

    Road bikes are designed to move people as efficiently as possible. This means the following come into play: aerodynamics, comfort, rolling resistance, gearing. All of these are optimized for the particular model. Speed is only a result of the equation, not the desired goal.

    What this practically means is (especially compared to a hybrid): you push down on the pedals & the bike just goes. It will seem as if very little effort is required to go fast. You will also find yourself going on longer & longer rides on a road bike because you'll be more comfortable because that's what the road bike was designed for. The steering will also seem much more sensitive, maybe even "twitchy". The saddle, much smaller and less padded than your hybrid, will seem terribly uncomfortable. But, experienced roadies realize that less padding is better and over time, you should find it comfortable. In fact, they even have carbon fiber saddles without any padding at all, that I hear are very comfortable if they fit your anatomy.

    It may take a little time to get comfortable in the more forward-leaning position of the road bike, but after that, it's no problem (assuming the bike fits you and is set up properly). After 100 years, the road bike has been optimized pretty well.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Oh, sorry, worth selling the hybrid? Only you can answer that question. It will depend on what your goals are. If you want to go farther in your rides, see more of the land, keeping up with other riders & socializing, more comfortably & more efficiently, sure, go ahead.

    But, a hybrid is a great bike for just putzing around town on, on flat MUPs, or getting groceries or running errands, or riding with the wife who maybe doesn't want to go fast or far.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  4. #4
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    Ive been riding my Spec Roubaix (carbon - and stock) since 2010 and I bought the bike weighting 320lbs. Never had a seconds problem with wheels or components. I also have a Trek 7.3. The Roubaix rides faster and further and is so light you hardly know its beneath you. The Trek is an awesome bike but heavy. The extra weight takes its toll on longer rides.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Allen55's Avatar
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    Hmmm...then what would be a good bike to look at getting? The only reason I would sell my Trek is to fund the other bike.
    Allen
    Riding since 09-16-2011
    TREK 7000

  6. #6
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Whatever you want. :shrug:

    Contact a local bike club, and ask them what are some good LBS's in the area to go to.

    Go to the LBS, check out what they have. Tell them what you want it for, what your budget is (usually the #1 determinant), and they'll set you up. Repeatedly go in to the shop. Make friends, before, during & after buying the bike. When they know you well is when you start getting special treatment (discounts, labor for nothing, alerted when special deals come along, etc...).

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  7. #7
    Senior Member loneviking61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen55 View Post
    Hmmm...then what would be a good bike to look at getting? The only reason I would sell my Trek is to fund the other bike.
    Hmmm, well, here's a suggestion (putting on my flame proof suit)...buy one of the old steel road bikes. Buy an 70's/80's era Schwinn Varsity, Bianchi or Fuji, maybe a Miata 610. Steel bikes, heavy, comfortable, 36 spoke wheels hold your weight well and you get to try out the more aggressive geomety of a road bike for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If you like these older steel bikes, and the geometry is comfortable for you---you can upgrade later to the latest, greatest, fastest riding carbon wonderbike.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Allen55's Avatar
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    Wasnt looking to upgrade from the Trek 7000 to the latest, greatest, carbon bike. All I asked was what would be a suggested bike for me in the readers opinion. Maybe I was wrong for asking a perfectly innocent question. Maybe not.
    Allen
    Riding since 09-16-2011
    TREK 7000

  9. #9
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    If I could only keep one bike, the trek or the roubaix - Id choose the roubaix everytime.

    My shopping method was to buy the most expensive bike I could afford. Luckily I was shopping at tax return time - hence the roubaix. I think the cost of the bike has also kept me motivated - no ethical way for me to bury a $2500 bike in the garge and not use it - works for me

  10. #10
    Senior Member Allen55's Avatar
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    Heh. I wont be dropping 2500 on a bike anytime soon. Lol. I'm unemployed because of my health but I could swing 1000-1200 if I sold the trek.
    Allen
    Riding since 09-16-2011
    TREK 7000

  11. #11
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Go test ride some and see what you like. Fit and preference are a very personal thing, that's why you won't get a definite answer.

  12. #12
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen55 View Post
    Heh. I wont be dropping 2500 on a bike anytime soon. Lol. I'm unemployed because of my health but I could swing 1000-1200 if I sold the trek.
    I totally get that - I wouldnt have the roubaix but for the tax rebate. However, it was the best $ I ever spent. How about the Specialized Allez, the Rouaix's cousin A tad heavier but same geometry etc and good solid components ($1200):

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bik...pexmid-compact

  13. #13
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    I am 386 as of today, and I ride a "road" bike. It's steel, it's got mountain gearing and fat tires, but it's got drops and brifters and a road touring frame. Sort of like a road/touring hybrid, if such a thing exists. Mine might be one of the more custom bikes in the world now that I think about it.

    Anyway, yes, fat people can ride road bikes. Probably wouldn't go carbon at your weight, but Aluminum and Steel are fine. A strong set of wheels will do you nice.

    Do you want a road bike? Who's to say. I greatly prefer my road bike to my hybrid. It's more comfortable and I can go faster; it feels more stable. Far more hand positions; makes all the difference in the world. I recommend them but that's my opinion. A lot of people don't like them, but they're usually more casual riders who haven't yet discovered the limitations in hand positions on flat bars because they rarely exceed an hour of cycling at a time. They aren't for everyone of course, so I would suggest you try it out.

    Do you need one? I'm not sure. You seem to have had issues which have kept you off the bike, so unless you know for certain that you want to ride your heart out and that you will spend many thousands of miles on it over the next quanta of years, I would probably not spring for a road bike over the hybrid. I only went with a road bike because I have plans to go many many thousands of miles on it, so to me the cost is worth it. I've already exceeded the $1/mile mark and I haven't had it a year yet. Eventually I hope to have that down to a few pennies per mile.

    So the ultimate answer is: If you try one out, and you like it a lot more than your hybrid, and you plan on sticking to cycling over the next few years... go for it! Otherwise, I'd probably mothball the idea until a later time when those things become true.

  14. #14
    Senior Member loneviking61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen55 View Post
    Wasnt looking to upgrade from the Trek 7000 to the latest, greatest, carbon bike. All I asked was what would be a suggested bike for me in the readers opinion. Maybe I was wrong for asking a perfectly innocent question. Maybe not.
    Nope, not wrong at all and no sarcasm intended! Heck, if I had the money to splurge, I'd probably have a carbon bike myself!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
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    For a Clyde of Allen's size I'd steer him away from an Allez. Too short of a headtube and very aggressive riding posture. Secteur on the other hand is an Aluminum copy of the Roubaix and can accommodate upright riding without much changing. That said you might keep in mind that a good hand-built rear wheel may cost $200 to $250 on top of trade-in/up value depending on details. Although an alternative is to pay the LBS to rebuild the stock wheel for you if they are good at wheel building. Bending in the spokes, stress relieved spokes and evenly and correctly tensioned spokes. Done right away and the stock wheels may give you great service, without the extra care you may still get lucky or you may have problems right away.

    Whatever brand you choose be sure to test ride and get it fit to you.


    Mark

  16. #16
    Junior Member WillCorrington's Avatar
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    I'd wait. Use the road bike idea as a carrot.

    If you're trying to lose weight and become more fit keep pushing what you have. You're burning more calories and shedding more fat pedaling that Trek 7000 10/15/20/60 miles than you will on a road bike.

  17. #17
    [IMG]http://i4.photobucke jeepseahawk's Avatar
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    If you start going on group rides it may be a wise idea to get a road bike. If not, keep the hybrid as someone mentioned, reward yourself at a certain weight goal. Riding any bike will help in weight/health issues. The key is to keep riding and making it fun, when it becomes a chore it has to be revamped.

  18. #18
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen55 View Post
    Was thinking today as I was getting some things done on the bike and was wondering if I could ride a real road bike at my size? 5-7 294 at the moment and am riding my Trek 7000 hybrid. I was wondering just what kind of a difference a road bike would make in my rides. Would it be worth selling the hybrid and going with a road bike? Could I even find one that I could ride at my size? Should I just wait tip im at my goal weight of 190? Got any thoughts on the matter?

    It's a conundrum, I tell ya!
    Didn't you give up riding for a year? Was it because you were dissatisfied with your current bike? If not, why are you considering getting a different one? And especially when you haven't had an interest in riding.

  19. #19
    Senior Member eja_ bottecchia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen55 View Post
    Wasnt looking to upgrade from the Trek 7000 to the latest, greatest, carbon bike. All I asked was what would be a suggested bike for me in the readers opinion. Maybe I was wrong for asking a perfectly innocent question. Maybe not.
    He was giving you great advice. In fact, everyone has given you good advice here. Don't be so overly sensitive.

    BTW. I own what is perhaps the best carbon bike out there. Yet I still love to ride my 23 yo steel bike. So listen to his advice!
    My current stable:

    1989 SLX Bottecchia (Campy Athena 11s)
    1999 Cannondale F400 mountain bike
    2012 Bianchi Infinito (Campy Record 11s)
    2012 Colnago C59 in PR99 color scheme (Campy Record 11s)

  20. #20
    Senior Member eja_ bottecchia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by loneviking61 View Post
    Hmmm, well, here's a suggestion (putting on my flame proof suit)...buy one of the old steel road bikes. Buy an 70's/80's era Schwinn Varsity, Bianchi or Fuji, maybe a Miata 610. Steel bikes, heavy, comfortable, 36 spoke wheels hold your weight well and you get to try out the more aggressive geomety of a road bike for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If you like these older steel bikes, and the geometry is comfortable for you---you can upgrade later to the latest, greatest, fastest riding carbon wonderbike.
    No need to put on flame suit. Steel is great, I know...I have two carbon road bikes and I still LOVE to ride my 1989 Columbus SLX Bottecchia. Incidentally, the fully loaded Colnago C59 is only 4 pounds lighter than the fully loaded 20 pound Bottecchia.

    My only caveat is that if you go back to 1970-1980 bikes you wll find down tube shifters and those may be harder to operate for a heavier, less flexible rider. I would look for a steel bike circa 1990s.
    My current stable:

    1989 SLX Bottecchia (Campy Athena 11s)
    1999 Cannondale F400 mountain bike
    2012 Bianchi Infinito (Campy Record 11s)
    2012 Colnago C59 in PR99 color scheme (Campy Record 11s)

  21. #21
    Senior Member goldfinch's Avatar
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    Ride for a while. Slowly build up a base of riding and fitness. See if you love it. If you do then get a road bike. In the meantime, watch Craigslist for good deals.

  22. #22
    JRD
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    Senior Member JRD's Avatar
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    I went from the Trek 7.3 Hybrid to the Trek 1000c. Night and day difference. I am 5-11 and currently 262lbs on the way down to my target weight. When I made the switch I was in the 285+ range. The 1000c has held up nicely and gives me a fast comfortable ride. If you are not comfortable you aren't going to want to ride very long!

  23. #23
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    Personally I would wait. What fits you now may not be so great later. I recently went from my slick-equipped mountain bike to my road bike and I am not having the same feelings. The road bike is a bit faster but I feel it's 'harder' to ride. I mean it's twitchier and less forgiving on rough pavement. Also seems it wants to go faster than the pace I like so I find my rides are a bit more fatiguing at the same distances compared to the mountain bike. I am about 200-205# down from 225# in May. So ride what's working for you and you can always buy later. Maybe take some $$ and equip for colder rides and maybe buy a trainer??? To keep some fitness when outside is not cooperating so much--sold mine 2 years ago when I was not riding and now I am pissed! Good luck and keep the wheels moving.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Gravity Aided's Avatar
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    Older, steel touring bikes aren't too expensive and offer a clyde a road bike feel with a little tamer handling, and, I think , better position on the bike for greater distances due to the posture on bike and saddle . You may be able to find one at a price on CL or a pawnshop or garage sale for low coin , or trade the Trek for one and some cash at a pawnshop .

  25. #25
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    If your current bike purchase is somewhat recent, what's the motivation to consider changing already?

    Hybrid is fine, a lot of miles ahead before you outgrow it. Ride more, see if you really like it and as someone else said, use the new bike purchase as motivation to get out there and ride more.

    If you decide to change the bike, short answer is yes, you can find a road bike that would work for you.

    Best piece of advice was already given: go to an LBS and test ride different geometries. Your body will tell you the right one for you. Personal preferences. FIT helps a lot too. Consider also changing the factory wheelset to something sturdier that would deal with clyde condition better (higher spoke count, stronger rims).

    Good luck

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