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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-13-12, 06:54 PM   #1
reno327
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Longer seatpost stronger than a shorter one for and Uber Clyde?

I've read all the stickies out there, Thomson is the best seatpost. I've read alloy seatpost are good too. This may sounds silly, but is the length of the seatpost also make a big factor in the strength of the seatpost? In other words, is a longer seatpost stronger than a shorter seatpost?
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Old 08-13-12, 07:20 PM   #2
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A shorter seat tube can provide a smaller frame triangle and less bottom bracket flex. But, at the expense of a longer seatpost, which, other things being equal, will be more flexible than a shorter equivilent, place more stress on the frame and subsequently be slightly weaker than a shorter seatpost. As long as you have more than the "minimum" amount of post insertion, most don't get too concerned about it. The longer post, with it's increase in flex can also provide a slightly more comfortable ride.

If you were enquiring with regard to using a longer or shorter post within the same sized frame, yes, slightly more insertion may be stronger. It depends upon how close you are to the minimum insertion point with the shorter post and how much excess the longer post would provide.
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Old 08-13-12, 07:23 PM   #3
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With regard to Thomson posts. They are popular not only because they seem to provide a high degree of strength at a reasonable weight and cost, but, also because they offer a broad rail clamp, both top and bottom that helps support the rails of clyde's saddles and help limit rail bending. There are other posts that offer a similiarly wide clamping surface, they just haven't gained the wide spread support that Thomsons have.
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Old 08-13-12, 07:28 PM   #4
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Keep in mind that if you use a sloping top tube frame, be sure the seatpost is long enough to penetrate the frame to proper depth.

If you use a short seatpost (to save weight or add strength) make sure you get it long enough to meet required depth I don't recall off hand but it may be 2 inches below top tube. If not, you can damage the frame itself as the seatpost will act as a fulcrum causing damage to the seat tupe collar area.
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Old 08-13-12, 10:35 PM   #5
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Such as which other seatposts, please share.
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Old 08-14-12, 09:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
With regard to Thomson posts. They are popular not only because they seem to provide a high degree of strength at a reasonable weight and cost, but, also because they offer a broad rail clamp, both top and bottom that helps support the rails of clyde's saddles and help limit rail bending. There are other posts that offer a similiarly wide clamping surface, they just haven't gained the wide spread support that Thomsons have.
I've switched to Thomsons on all of my bikes simply because they've "nailed it" with regards to making seat adjustments easy and measurable.
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