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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-16-12, 07:31 AM   #1
cwcaesar
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Snake bitten

Well, it finally happened. I had my first flat tire on a bicycle since I was a kid. I was riding on the shoulder as cars were passing me and I saw a golf ball sized rock just a bit too late to avoid it. I hit it and heard the tell-tale hiss of the air rapidly escaping my front tire. I was nearing the end of a long ride and was fairly close to home, but a very narrow bridge was in my path, so I had to make the call of shame to my wife to come get me.

I do believe that it is time to invest in a pump. I have been researching them already, I just haven't pulled the trigger on one yet. I am considering a Topeak Wedge Bag in Medium. I will store all repair gear in there like the patch kit, multi tool, and maybe a CO2 pump and a few cartridges and a spare tube. I will add a pump that mounts beside the water bottle cage as well, so that I will have a manual pump as well as a CO2. Any advice on the CO2 pumps? I haven't researched these yet.

I found that I had a pinch flat after I got home by the signature snake bite holes in the tube.
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Old 08-16-12, 08:33 AM   #2
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CO2 pumps make inflating the tire faster. They're good for group rides (minimize the down time when flatting). Mini pumps take a little longer but are more reliable, they work your arms a bit but you can get good pressure with them (co2 gets you to 90psi or so, plenty enough to finish the ride/get home).
I've tried both and observed other riders and my take away is this: co2 when in group rides only, a mini pump otherwise. Patch kits are 50/50, they're small so why not carrying them, but i rather carry two spare tubes than repair one mid ride.
Solo rides from home i carry only one spare tube and a mini pump, for centuries or group rides i add a second spare tube and the mini pump.
If i flat more than twice in the same ride i take it as a signal to go home.

Snake bite holes in the tube means need more pressure on the tires.
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Old 08-16-12, 09:00 AM   #3
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I think in this case, snake bite means you hit an obstacle so it's not necessarily a reflection of your chosen pressure.

I use CO2 all the time, no frame pump. My last one rattled and drove me nuts, so I ditched it. Those Lezyne micro drive pumps look good though.

I use one of those genuine innovations CO2 inflators. You'll find two kinds out there - the kind that require threaded cylinders (so the head is tiny but the carts are expensive) or the kind that will accept generic unthreaded cylinders (big head, carts are cheap). Or get threaded and order threaded carts on amazon in bulk.

a 16g cartridge will inflate a 23mm tire to about 130 psi if you manage to get it all in there. It will inflate a 25mm tire to about 110, so you definitely want the 16g size.

As for what goes in my seat bag - 2 spare tires, 1 patch kit, inflator, 3 cylinders, a multi tool (Park IB-2), a spoke wrench and a spare master link for my chain. that patch kit is really a last resort - I have no intention of patching a tire while I'm riding. You can patch it at home and return the tube to your seat bag after you verify that the patch will hold if you want.
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Old 08-16-12, 09:42 AM   #4
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Well, I would rather not repair a tube on the road, but I will leave the kit in there just in case. I mostly ride alone, but I think I would like to add the CO2 eventually just to have it. I ride a 23mm wide tire on a 23mm wide rim (HED Belgium) and I was running pressures about 80 to 85 ish (I can't remember if I topped off before this ride though, pressures may have been lower than that). I may bump it up to 90 or so and see if I have better luck. I had always run the rear with higher pressure, but I may run them the same to avoid this in the future.
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Old 08-16-12, 09:51 AM   #5
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Good One:

CO2
http://www.aawyeah.com/genuine-innov...tire-inflator/

Pump:
http://www.aawyeah.com/topeak-road-m...-gauge-trp-3g/

Pump your tires up Before each ride with a floor pump.
80-85 sounds low. How much do you weight?
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Last edited by 10 Wheels; 08-16-12 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 08-16-12, 10:42 AM   #6
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Unless you weigh 140 or something your tire pressures sound very low. I pump mine up to the max allowed, although I may let the front be softer by 10 psi.

So for 23mm tires I was using 120 psi, and for my current 25mm tires, I inflate to 110 psi (which is the max on the sidewall)

Nobody WANTS to repair a tube on the road but the surest way to HAVE to is to not have what you need to fix your situation.
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Old 08-16-12, 11:15 AM   #7
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I weigh just over 250, but it was my understanding that you should not go over 90 psi on the wider HED rims, so I was trying to stay below that. Am I incorrect in using this as my max pressure?
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Old 08-16-12, 11:18 AM   #8
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210-215 lbs, I use 100-110 psi in 700 X 23's.
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Old 08-16-12, 11:46 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
I think in this case, snake bite means you hit an obstacle so it's not necessarily a reflection of your chosen pressure.
Agree, not necessarily a reflection of chosen pressure, if you hit a curb at 30+ mph, regardless of pressure the snake bites... but as a general rule, pinch flats are greatly reduced with higher pressure. Topping off before ride is just something easy that greatly reduces the chances of flatting (at least due to that cause).

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
I use one of those genuine innovations CO2 inflators. You'll find two kinds out there - the kind that require threaded cylinders (so the head is tiny but the carts are expensive) or the kind that will accept generic unthreaded cylinders (big head, carts are cheap). Or get threaded and order threaded carts on amazon in bulk.

a 16g cartridge will inflate a 23mm tire to about 130 psi if you manage to get it all in there. It will inflate a 25mm tire to about 110, so you definitely want the 16g size.
Guess operator skill makes the difference, i use the non threaded cartridges (twice only, so not much practice), and never managed to get more than 90 psi in the tire. Have to watch out not to get the finger stuck to the frozen cartridge also. Definitively needs some practice, or a better designed pump.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
As for what goes in my seat bag - 2 spare tires, 1 patch kit, inflator, 3 cylinders, a multi tool (Park IB-2), a spoke wrench and a spare master link for my chain. that patch kit is really a last resort - I have no intention of patching a tire while I'm riding. You can patch it at home and return the tube to your seat bag after you verify that the patch will hold if you want.
Same here, no tube patching mid ride, patch the tubes home, test them, back to the seat bag.
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Old 08-16-12, 12:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
210-215 lbs, I use 100-110 psi in 700 X 23's.
I used this pressure as well on a 19 mm rim. Actually it was more like 110 in the front and 120 in the rear.

Does anyone know of any problems with going above 90 psi on the HED C2 (23mm wide) rims? I am not sure where I read this, but I was using this as a guide. Is there a max pressure for the rim? Or do I just go by what is on the tire?
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Old 08-16-12, 07:35 PM   #11
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I can't say for sure, but I ride 23 mm rims and I go above 90 all the time
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Old 08-16-12, 08:22 PM   #12
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here is the best of both worlds....I have it and love it: [h=1]Lezyne Pressure Drive CFH Pump / CO2 Inflator[/h]
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Old 08-16-12, 08:58 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acquaspin View Post
CO2 pumps make inflating the tire faster. They're good for group rides (minimize the down time when flatting). Mini pumps take a little longer but are more reliable, they work your arms a bit but you can get good pressure with them (co2 gets you to 90psi or so, plenty enough to finish the ride/get home).
I've tried both and observed other riders and my take away is this: co2 when in group rides only, a mini pump otherwise.
Just get a full sized frame pump. They can get tires up to full pressure in half the effort which goes with a mini-pump and aren't that unpleasant to use.
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Old 08-16-12, 10:08 PM   #14
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I can't say for sure, but I ride 23 mm rims and I go above 90 all the time
Thanks, I will have to research further.
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Old 08-17-12, 06:25 AM   #15
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Thanks, I will have to research further.
Well, after further research, the general consensus is that the rerecommended pressure is 10-12% lower than the pressure you would normally run on a 19mm rim width. So, I gutss I did have the pressures too low. I guess I will run them in the neighborhood of 100 psi and see how that works out.

Thanks to you all for pointing that out to me!
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Old 08-17-12, 10:08 AM   #16
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Here's an unfortunate fact: We're Clydes. We weigh more than the average recreational cyclist, and a LOT more than the average competitive cyclist.

Bicycle store marketing sucks. They try to convince all of us that we should be riding the same bikes that the pros ride, but unless you weigh as little as the pros do, and have a team of mechanics following you, prepared to swap out a new wheel if you get a flat, then maybe you should reconsider.

As Clydes, we have no business riding skinny tires that are designed for competitors, on frames that aren't designed to handle tires wide enough for our mass.

Check out http://www.dorkypantsr.us/bike-tire-...alculator.html.

And follow this advice: "If the calculated pressure exceeds your tire’s rated maximum, choose a wider tire."

And I'll add the following: "If the calculated tire width exceeds your frame's tire clearance, choose a different frame."

Running skinny tires with too much pressure is just uncomfortable and dangerous. Find the right tire size for you. If your frame can't fit that size tire, then why are you riding that frame?
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Old 08-17-12, 10:18 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwcaesar View Post
I used this pressure as well on a 19 mm rim. Actually it was more like 110 in the front and 120 in the rear.

Does anyone know of any problems with going above 90 psi on the HED C2 (23mm wide) rims? I am not sure where I read this, but I was using this as a guide. Is there a max pressure for the rim? Or do I just go by what is on the tire?
The HED website has a good discussion of this topic...
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