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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-16-12, 08:44 AM   #1
FrenchFit 
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Trying the Neuvation R28X Aero

Garage accident, car tagged my front wheel of my parked Roubaix and tore out a spoke. I decided to replace the stock Mavic Aksium with a Neuvation, (after confirming the fork was ok)..

I've used Nugent's RSL and M series, didn't think the M was a perfect choice for my weight (220) ..it felt just a little springy - I have no idea why. My son was glad to take them. Picked the R28x Aero http://www.neuvationcycling.com/prod...black-1298.htm good looking and inexpensive.

A handful of rides so far, but one long climb and a long downhill over 30mph. This is a nice wheel, and fast. Feels a lot like the R series climbing and I expect it will wear about the same: I'm at the end of year two of the R28 SLs and they are in perfect shape, still true. Of course now I want to do the back too, but changing wheels is addicting upgrade, start with one bike and you must do others.

This Clyde be styling, on the cheap. Low spoke count wheels rock. (Nod to GP on the straps.)
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Last edited by FrenchFit; 08-16-12 at 09:00 AM.
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Old 08-16-12, 02:27 PM   #2
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I picked up a pair of M28Xs for my Synapse last summer & have really been enjoying them, that is, right up until a couple of weeks ago when a nipple on the rear backed off to the point of disengaging its spoke. Now it's rattling around inside the rim section. Luckily when I bought the wheels I got their Protection Plan thrown in for free, so tomorrow the wheel is going back for repair or replacement.
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Old 08-16-12, 06:32 PM   #3
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Interesting. I've seen that happen on MTB wheels..but they've usually fallen out of true long before the spoke comes loose. So, you're saying one spoke slowly worked it way off the nipple, but the wheel stayed in true? You must admit, that's pretty amazing. Maybe it stripped out all of a sudden due to an impact...?

I'm going to warn my son to check the spoke tension on his Ms every once in a while.
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Old 08-17-12, 04:49 AM   #4
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The wheel stayed true for months and many miles, then about 4 miles from home on a long Sunday ride, I felt a slight shimmy coming from the rear, barely noticeable. In fact, I initially thought it was a little bit of uneven pavement, because it was so insignificant that I didn't notice it happening consistently through those last few miles at all. When I got home and was wheeling the bike into the garage, it was the sound of the nipple loose inside the rim that brought it to my attention. Even then, the wheel was only very slightly out of true, not even far enough out to rub the brakes, which I keep adjusted fairly close. I'm not sure if it was a gradual loosening or a sudden failure of spoke or nipple; I didn't examine the spoke that closely after I identified the problem. I took the cassette and tire off and boxed it up for return. Since I had the protection plan warranty I figured I didn't need to spend a lot of my own time on the problem.
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Old 08-17-12, 08:18 AM   #5
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With a 20h rear I've thought that if I lost a spoke the wheel would be unrideable, it would jump way out of true. I guess that aero rim is pretty resistent to lateral movement. Good to know.
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Old 08-17-12, 09:02 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
I'm going to warn my son to check the spoke tension on his Ms every once in a while.
Everybody should do that with every wheel they rid, especially clydes. You can "pluck" the spoke like a guitar string and if you don't have a tin ear you can generally tell if there are big differences. Obviously spoke lacing patterns affect things so you only want to compare like spokes.

http://www.bikexprt.com/bicycle/tension.htm
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Old 08-17-12, 10:11 AM   #7
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Everybody should do that with every wheel they rid, especially clydes. You can "pluck" the spoke like a guitar string and if you don't have a tin ear you can generally tell if there are big differences. Obviously spoke lacing patterns affect things so you only want to compare like spokes.

http://www.bikexprt.com/bicycle/tension.htm
Just don't expect drive-side and non-drive-side rear spokes to vibrate at the same pitch due to the wheel's being dished.
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Old 08-20-12, 09:50 AM   #8
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This wheel as 13 spokes! At 220 lbs you are not worried about that?
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Old 08-20-12, 12:14 PM   #9
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This wheel as 13 spokes! At 220 lbs you are not worried about that?
It has 16 actually, and as a front wheel it isn't subjected to the same loads as the rear wheel, which has 20. My M28X is the same configuration, as is the OEM Shimanos that came on the bike.
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