Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 53
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Century nutrition for a fat guy? Skinny roadies have much different caloric require

    Well I am 265. I can not relate to skinny guys who can make a whole century on 2 gel packs and water.

    What are you guys actually packing. I am kind of a muscle clyde. Looking for real world experience.

  2. #2
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    8,003
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll tell you tomorrow, but for rides of 75 or so, I usually drink a bottle of gatorade per hour & at about the 2 hour mark I'll start snacking on Clif bars - usually 1 per hour and a half or so. I think I ate 4 on a recent 85 mile ride I did. Maybe some fig newtons along the way, although last time I brought those they were more like fig crumbles by the time I got to them.

    I'm really not a gel fan but I do usually bring one or two on a long ride just in case, or some of those clif blocks.

    I think eating some Actual Food at about the 60 mile mark (sandwich or something) is very productive for me too.

    For rides of < 50 miles, I will eat one clif bar at the half way mark and that's it, so ramping up the mileage really makes a difference in the amount of food i have to eat.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by evand View Post
    Well I am 265. I can not relate to skinny guys who can make a whole century on 2 gel packs and water.

    What are you guys actually packing. I am kind of a muscle clyde. Looking for real world experience.
    Gels are not food. They are meant to be used for quick energy. You're caloric requirements for long rides are going to be in the 250-350 (quality)calories per hour. You can take in more than that but you will not be able to absorb the nutrients any faster than that rate. It doesn't matter how big or small you are. If you take in more than that you risk digestive issues on longer rides. The harder you push your limits the more this is true. If you are just cruising, it doesn't matter as much. Everyone is a little different but the above guidelines should work. If I start a century with a good solid meal I'm usually good for about 30- 70 miles depending on the difficulty of the ride before I have to start eating. The key is to start eating and drinking before you get hungry or thirsty.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  4. #4
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hammond, La
    My Bikes
    Wabi Lightning RE, Wabi Classic
    Posts
    1,420
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For 75 mile ride:
    1/4 peanut & honey sandwich every 14 or so miles. 1/2 P&H 1/2 banana, if available, at halfway stop. Water in one bottle, water and GuBrew in the other as needed. I've never over eaten on a long ride but I've under eaten and it sucks.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well here what I am bringing. I will be starting with gatorade in all 3 bottles. A couple packs for water refills and eating the large bar after 1 hour to avoid crashing.

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
    Last edited by evand; 08-17-12 at 08:38 PM.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Haqve you eaten the Big 100 bar on a ride before? I used to eat them before the gym and they messed up my stomach. If I ate them as a meal replacement any other time, it was fine.

  7. #7
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    8,003
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your gatorade packs are much bigger than the ones I use... mine look like skinny little plastic bag tubes. like these here: http://www.powdermixdirect.com/Gator...-p/scst800.htm

    I usually get a cannister of 8 of them at Target, you can get the low sugar kind or the regular sugar kind. One per bottle for me.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by boswell View Post
    Haqve you eaten the Big 100 bar on a ride before? I used to eat them before the gym and they messed up my stomach. If I ate them as a meal replacement any other time, it was fine.

    I can eat anything. No problem with stomach with anything ever under any condition. I think it does have sugar alcohol in them which act as a stool softener.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ellensburg,WA
    My Bikes
    Schwinn Broadway, Specialized Secteur Sport(crashed) Spec. Roubaix Sport, Spec. Crux
    Posts
    1,782
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Gels are not food. They are meant to be used for quick energy. You're caloric requirements for long rides are going to be in the 250-350 (quality)calories per hour. You can take in more than that but you will not be able to absorb the nutrients any faster than that rate. It doesn't matter how big or small you are. If you take in more than that you risk digestive issues on longer rides. The harder you push your limits the more this is true. If you are just cruising, it doesn't matter as much. Everyone is a little different but the above guidelines should work. If I start a century with a good solid meal I'm usually good for about 30- 70 miles depending on the difficulty of the ride before I have to start eating. The key is to start eating and drinking before you get hungry or thirsty.
    By your definition what ever it may be Cliff bars are not food either. Yeah whatever. Gels are nutrition as is any food you might be eating on your ride. It is not the distance that matters as much as how long it takes you to go that distance. I eat sometimes as little as 100 calories and hour after the first hour and do fine. I've used cereal bars, fig bars, Cliff bars, fruit, and a bunch of other items including gels on rides. I use gels for quick pick-me-ups like right before a climb but I do factor them into my 100 - 250 calorie an hour plan after the first hour. I do not factor in calories from beverages such as Nuun or Gatorade.


    Mark

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    My Bikes
    Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
    Posts
    2,130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My requirements are as follows; 45 minutes in I take my first electrolyte tab and keep taking them one every 45-60 minutes, every hour I have something to eat half a bagel, slice of banana loaf, poptart, rice crispie square. My body doesn't like comercial bars but I have been known to eat a Snikers bar on a century. As for fluids it's water only with a can of Coke thrown in at the half way point if I can get my hands on one, I love the rush it gives me plus for me nothing is better than a Coke when I'm thirsty. I do use gels but only if I feel the need for some quick energy. The above holds true for any ride over 120km.
    Best thing about cycling is when I'm at work I'm thinking of cycling, when I'm cycling I'm thinking about cycling.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Gatorage and gel do count. They just are a different nutritional path they are quicker faster pathway of energy.

    A healthy slow digesting breakfast and lunch are the main power providers. These are just additional fill in's.

  12. #12
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,475
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Homey is dead on...I would seriously consider dropping all the sugary Gatorade and the 100 protein bar and use more carb based foods (not simple carbs)

    Large amounts of protein during endurance sports is risky. On longer rides such as a century you do need some protein but in small amounts along with a high carb diet. I would target 250-300 calories per hour with 80percent carbs at least.

    Then if you need to supplement with the Gatorade, it will fit in better.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    By your definition what ever it may be Cliff bars are not food either. Yeah whatever. Gels are nutrition as is any food you might be eating on your ride. It is not the distance that matters as much as how long it takes you to go that distance. I eat sometimes as little as 100 calories and hour after the first hour and do fine. I've used cereal bars, fig bars, Cliff bars, fruit, and a bunch of other items including gels on rides. I use gels for quick pick-me-ups like right before a climb but I do factor them into my 100 - 250 calorie an hour plan after the first hour. I do not factor in calories from beverages such as Nuun or Gatorade.
    I'm not sure the Cliff bars fit that category. It depends on what's in them. I was talking about gels. Like Hammer Gel and Gu etc. Those products are designed to: 1. To allay hunger immediately before an event. 2. As your sole source of calories in workouts/races lasting up to two hours, sometimes up to three hours in certain circumstances 3. As a part–time fuel during longer workouts and races to supplement protein–fortified fuels.

    Can you do a century on just gels? Sure but you are not doing yourself any favors because they are not providing your body every thing it needs to sustain itself.

    Your question about getting by on less than 250-350 calories an hour. Sure you can depending on your exertion level. If you are just cruising or riding well below your LT level then it's not that big of a problem. I was talking about too many calories because digestive issues are a major problem on longer rides and that is most often a result of ingesting too many calories. Proper fueling is a balancing act between getting enough calories and too many.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  14. #14
    Senior Member BigJeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    414
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Gatorade, drink as often as you feel like it. Stop and refill at a gas station when you run out. When you stop at a gas station, eat a protein bar... and maybe a banana.

    Big100? Holy crap. I had one once....it is like eating a brick with some kind of crazy sugars in it, like 6-8 different kinds of sugar?! For something like that, know how your body will react before relying on it.


    INGREDIENTS: METAMYOSYN® V100 Protein Blend (Whey Protein Concentrate, Milk Protein Concentrate, Calcium Sodium Caseinate, Whey Protein Isolate, Dried Egg White, L-Glutamine), Corn Syrup, Brown Rice Syrup, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Glycerin, Natural Flavors, Wheat Flour, Sugar, Crystalline Fructose, Canola Oil, Maltodextrin, Potassium Chloride, Fractionated Palm Kernel Oil, Vitamin and Mineral Blend (Ascorbic Acid, Ferrous Fumarate, Tricalcium Phosphate, d-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Niacinamide, Zinc Oxide, Copper Gluconate, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A, Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Potassium Iodide, Cyanocobalamin), Corn Starch, Cocoa
    (processed with alkali), Honey Powder (Maltodextrin, Honey), Baking Soda, Soy Lecithin, Wheat Germ, Peanut Flour, Almond Meal, Salt, Caramel Color, Annatto Color

  15. #15
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    Homey is dead on...I would seriously consider dropping all the sugary Gatorade and the 100 protein bar and use more carb based foods (not simple carbs)
    Thanks, I do have a tiny bit of experience in the subject.

    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    Large amounts of protein during endurance sports is risky. On longer rides such as a century you do need some protein but in small amounts along with a high carb diet. I would target 250-300 calories per hour with 80percent carbs at least.

    Then if you need to supplement with the Gatorade, it will fit in better.
    Just to reinforce, don't discount protein and fat too much You do need some in long distance efforts (two of the things Gels lack). There is a reason Hammer nutrition created Perpetuem when they already had a good long distance fuel in Sustained Energy. They saw the need for protein in the mix. Back in the day of all the "carbo" loading I tried that and it caused me no end of grief. The longer your effort the more important it is to get some protein and fats in your fuel system. I don't know if centuries are long enough for it to be a major issue but everyone is a little different and it will be more of an issue for some than others.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  16. #16
    Senior Member epicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Chicago Suburb, IL
    Posts
    93
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I actually put a blog lost out on this topic before I did my 150 km hilly (6 hours) ride this past weekend. Here's the link:

    http://www.learnfitness.com/2012/08/...urance-events/

    What worked well for me was eating every 15-20 minutes, small things like a gu or a few bloks. I'd also drink at the same time as well to make sure I was hydrated. I had one bottle of water and one with an electrolyte drink (I use Skratch labs). I'd usually stop at the rest stops every hour and get something more solid like fruit, nuts, 1/2 Peanut Butter sandwich, or maybe a bar.

    The key for me was using my bike computers auto lap to go off every 15 min or 5 miles and use that alarm to cue my fueling. That way I didn't fail to fuel and thus bonk because of a dumb oversight.

    I'm 270 so we're close in weight ... fueling is important and you're right, we're not like the lighter guys. Moving our size around has a bit higher demand for fuel but not as high as you might think.

    Keep it simple and most of all have a lot of fun!
    Sean — http://www.learnfitness.com/
    Road - 10' Lynskey Cooper Titanium w/SRAM Force
    MTB - 00' Schwinn HomeGrown Factory (with road slicks)

  17. #17
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,475
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oddly enough I am a huge hammer fan. I am doing - week on the jmt two weeks from now and perpepteum and recoverite will be my
    primary fuels.

    I just didn't want to preach one brand.

    Caffe latte ftw!

  18. #18
    Fredly
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    My Bikes
    Surly Long Haul Trucker w/ SRAM Rival, & 36H 38's, Late 70's Santana Tandem w/ Double Diamond frame
    Posts
    452
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I burn waaaay more calories than the skinny people on centuries. The most difficult thing for me though is replacing the salts/electrolytes. Without enough of those I totally cramp up early.

    If you get a chance, stuff some of those little McD's salt packets in your pocket. They're easy to open and put in your mouth while riding. These days I usually use endurolytes and salt sticks but I'm definitely known to roll through a mcd's for a water (which is just an excuse to grab a bunch of salts).

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by iconicflux View Post
    I burn waaaay more calories than the skinny people on centuries. The most difficult thing for me though is replacing the salts/electrolytes. Without enough of those I totally cramp up early.

    If you get a chance, stuff some of those little McD's salt packets in your pocket. They're easy to open and put in your mouth while riding. These days I usually use endurolytes and salt sticks but I'm definitely known to roll through a mcd's for a water (which is just an excuse to grab a bunch of salts).
    Just be aware that there are more electrolytes than just sodium, and too much sodium can be a bad thing. If NOTHING else, use lite salt (it also has potassium), or something a bit more reliable for even more electrolytes (calcium and magnesium are two more high on the list).
    Wanted: A new bicycle!
    My birthday is next week. Send monies to the address below!

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    My Bikes
    Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
    Posts
    2,130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm pretty sure if I put a salt pouch in my mouth it would be followed by everything in my stomache, saying that one of my favorite thing for double centuries+ is plain Lays Potato chips.
    Best thing about cycling is when I'm at work I'm thinking of cycling, when I'm cycling I'm thinking about cycling.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ellensburg,WA
    My Bikes
    Schwinn Broadway, Specialized Secteur Sport(crashed) Spec. Roubaix Sport, Spec. Crux
    Posts
    1,782
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    I'm not sure the Cliff bars fit that category. It depends on what's in them. I was talking about gels. Like Hammer Gel and Gu etc. Those products are designed to: 1. To allay hunger immediately before an event. 2. As your sole source of calories in workouts/races lasting up to two hours, sometimes up to three hours in certain circumstances 3. As a part–time fuel during longer workouts and races to supplement protein–fortified fuels.

    Can you do a century on just gels? Sure but you are not doing yourself any favors because they are not providing your body every thing it needs to sustain itself.

    Your question about getting by on less than 250-350 calories an hour. Sure you can depending on your exertion level. If you are just cruising or riding well below your LT level then it's not that big of a problem. I was talking about too many calories because digestive issues are a major problem on longer rides and that is most often a result of ingesting too many calories. Proper fueling is a balancing act between getting enough calories and too many.
    Perhaps you missed my point. Statements such as you made "gels are not food" seem ignorant to me. Gels are nutrition just as much as fruit, fibre, meat, poultry, and dairy products in that it provides calories and nutrients. Just like folks that only eat bananas on a long ride those that only consume gels are not doing themselves any favors. I think we can agree on that. I agree that it is smart to eat with balance while riding long distances, don't think I was expressing anything different than that. My point is gels can play a roll in on the bike nutrition. There is not one right answer that will fit everyone. Further define "quality". Cite sources, post certs, degrees, back up your claims. I do not know you, you do not know me and I'm guessing that the OP knows neither of us. The problem with posting a quick answer with statements like you made is that much more information needs to be disclosed explaining what you mean IMHO. I can appreciate that you have plenty of experience in long distance riding but what worked or works for you will not necessarily work for others and there is a bunch of difference from what the op is asking and what your ride requirements have been.
    Last edited by Black wallnut; 08-17-12 at 11:43 PM.


    Mark

  22. #22
    Senior Member slowride454's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Canfield Yelli Screamy, GT Karakoram SS, Specialized Roubaix, Soma Double Cross
    Posts
    429
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I carry apples and bananas along with granola bars. I try to have a mix of Gatorade and water. Gatorade in the frame cages and water in my jersey pouches.
    Specialized Roubaix - Canfield Brothers Yelli Screamy - GT Karakoram SS - Soma Double Cross Disc

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NZ
    My Bikes
    More than 1, but, less than S-1
    Posts
    3,765
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have to agree with what Homeyba and vesteroid have said.

    Regardless of how much larger we are and how many more calories we burn, are systems aren't designed to utilize substantially more calories per hour than anyone else.

    Subsequently, eating small amounts frequently becomes very important. At least for me.

    I've not been a user of the commercial products. But, that may change for this coming Novermber's Taupo Challenge.

    In the past I've relied on a good breakfast of oatmeal with raisins or a mixture of corn flakes, muesli and yogurt. On the road I rely on in more or less this order: granola bar(s), banana, fruit newtons, snickers bars, gummy candies. Occassionally there might have been a pbj thrown in there. My principle has been to work from the slightly more complex energy in the granola bar and banana toward simpler sugars near the end, culminating in gummy candies.

    With regard to hydration: I tend to not like full strength sports drinks. So, I start with one bottle of water and one of approximately 50% dilute sport drink. I'll carry one sachet of sport powder which will be good for two additional bottles. I attempt to maintain the classic minimum of 1 bottle per hour.
    Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    Perhaps you missed my point. ....

    Maybe I should re-phrase this for you gels should not be used as primary fuels on events lasting more than 2-3 hrs. That was my point. Look at the ingredients, they are not fuels like "fruit, fibre, meat, poultry, and dairy products" Gels are primarily carbohydrates, little else.

    If you read my original post I gave a calorie range "250-350 (quality)calories per hour" not a specific number or a specific fuel. If I was trying to give the OP what worked for me I would have been quite a bit more specific. As far as "quality" foods go, it's pretty basic. Quality foods are foods that contain easily digestible combinations of carbohydrates, proteins, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Quality fuels are things like Spiz, Perpetuem, Sustained Energy, Extran etc. You can also use "real" foods too as long as you are paying attention to what you are eating. The only problem with solid fuels is that they are more difficult to digest. Why is that a problem? Let me explain. As we exercise blood flow is diverted from our digestive tract to our muscles. Since there is less blood flow it is more difficult to digest solid fuels. This often leads to the digestive distress that many people complain about on century and longer rides. There are books written on this stuff. If you'd like some lite bedtime reading here you go: (The OP might want to peruse through the first one. Lost of good stuff there.)
    http://www.ultracycling.com/sections/articles/

    http://www.hammernutrition.com/knowl...wledge-section

    http://www.spiz.net/product_information.html
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sirrus Comp
    Posts
    596
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I dunno...it seems like folks are eating quite a bit. I did a 46 mile ride last weekend on NUUN and a single Luna bar. And that was 4+ hours (climbing and I'm slow).

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •