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-   -   Tires and Wheels Questions (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/840274-tires-wheels-questions.html)

E_is_Chill 08-18-12 04:31 PM

Tires and Wheels Questions
 
2 Attachment(s)
A month ago I purchased a World Sport Schwinn and I've been loving it.

But I'm in need of some new tires. I caught two flats on my rear wheels since buying it, no big deal compared to the stories I've read on here. The first flat I got, after pumping it again, the air went out in 10-20minutes of just walking with the bike, So I bought a new tube. The second flat came after a 10 mile ride yesterday, 60+ miles were put in since I got the new tube. With no trains or buses around I took a risk, pumped the tire and made it back home fine after riding on it after 6 miles. When I woke up today, flat.

The tires that came on the bike are are 27x1 1/8 panaracers.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=268133
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=268134





I'm 6'0 and around 280-290 lbs and would like to move up to some 27x1 1/4 tires. I use my bike for 13 mile commutes to and from work, as well as going on rides about 2 or 3 times as long as my commutes on my time off.

I've been looking at the tires listed on this site: http://www.bikemanforu.com/27-inch-road-bike-tires/

and I have been considering these Panaracer Pana Pasela Tour Guard Bicycle Tires: http://www.amazon.com/Panaracer-Pase...ef=pd_sim_sg_2

At this moment I need something that's affordable $15-50 for a pair. However, I would definitely like to hear your recommendations for something pricer for future references.



Wheel question:

My front wheel is an Araya 27x1 1/4 w/o HP. JAPAN
My rear wheel is an Wobler Champion "Modele 85" 27"

Simply because one wheel says 27 inches and the other says 27x1 1/4, I must ask, is there anything weird or bad about this? or no?

and recommendations for new aluminum wheels would be greatly appreciated, prices high and low.

PhotoJoe 08-18-12 04:35 PM

I don't have any advice on the wheels, but did you find the source of the flats? Did you save the old tube? Are the flats in the same spot? I'm wondering if there is something with your rim or something stuck in your tire causing it. Fix the problem....THEN the flat. You'll have less flats this way!

c23 08-18-12 04:37 PM

Always find out why a tube went flat! Do not just swap in new tubes. Tubes do not just go flat without a reason.
After you remove the tube, be sure to inflate it until it's a little bigger than the width of your tire (maybe up to 1.5 times the width, but not much more) to give it some pressure, and this will make it easier to determine where the puncture occurred because the air will make a slight hissing sound as it escapes.
With the tube inflated like this, hold it up to your ear, and slowly listen to the entire circumference of the tube until you locate the puncture. If you cannot find a leak by ear you can dunk the tube in water and watch for bubbles. Smaller or slower leaks may need more air in tube. This is important because if the puncture occurred on the inside diameter of the tire (the part that rests near the spokes), then you need to address that problem before patching or replacing the tube, otherwise you'll continue to get flats.
Once you've located the puncture, you can either patch the tube or replace it outright with a new tube. I patch my own tubes until either the valve breaks, or there's too big of a hole to patch. I had one old tube with probably more than 20 patches on it before it gave up the ghost. You can just buy new tubes if you want, but it's more expensive and patching is a good skill to have.
Before you put the tire and tube back on the rim, inspect the rim and make sure the rim tape is properly installed and in good condition with no spoke ends protruding, and no burrs or other protuberances that might puncture the tube. Next, and this is probably the most important part, carefully inspect both the inside and outside of the tire for any thing that might have caused the flat. In the first part where I mentioned trying to locate the puncture by inflating and listening for air escaping from the tube, if the puncture was on the outside circumference of the tube then the pointy culprit that was responsible for the puncture is probably still in the tire and needs to be located and removed, otherwise you'll just have to repair or replace another tube all over again.
If your tube had a blowout rather than a normal puncture, you need to find and fix the reason before going further because that can be extremely dangerous, especially at high speeds.

E_is_Chill 08-18-12 07:27 PM

I found the puncture in the tube. But the wire bead is exposed, about an inch, what to do? is it fine?

*edit*

Found out I need new tires, any suggestions?

nfmisso 08-18-12 10:17 PM

I recommend Bell Kevlar 32-630 (27 x 1 / 1 3/8) available at Wal-mart. I have 5,000 plus miles on a set on my World Tourist. For extra flat protection I use STOP FLATS 2 liners and Avenir Thorn Resistant tubes.

They are inexpensive, very long lasting tires.

jethro56 08-19-12 07:26 AM

Having really good luck with Pasela Tour Guard in a 35X700c size. Reasonable all around performance and value priced. paid $22 ea.

Tony N. 08-19-12 08:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c23 (Post 14622750)
Always find out why a tube went flat! Do not just swap in new tubes. Tubes do not just go flat without a reason.
After you remove the tube, be sure to inflate it until it's a little bigger than the width of your tire (maybe up to 1.5 times the width, but not much more) to give it some pressure, and this will make it easier to determine where the puncture occurred because the air will make a slight hissing sound as it escapes.
With the tube inflated like this, hold it up to your ear, and slowly listen to the entire circumference of the tube until you locate the puncture. If you cannot find a leak by ear you can dunk the tube in water and watch for bubbles. Smaller or slower leaks may need more air in tube. This is important because if the puncture occurred on the inside diameter of the tire (the part that rests near the spokes), then you need to address that problem before patching or replacing the tube, otherwise you'll continue to get flats.
Once you've located the puncture, you can either patch the tube or replace it outright with a new tube. I patch my own tubes until either the valve breaks, or there's too big of a hole to patch. I had one old tube with probably more than 20 patches on it before it gave up the ghost. You can just buy new tubes if you want, but it's more expensive and patching is a good skill to have.
Before you put the tire and tube back on the rim, inspect the rim and make sure the rim tape is properly installed and in good condition with no spoke ends protruding, and no burrs or other protuberances that might puncture the tube. Next, and this is probably the most important part, carefully inspect both the inside and outside of the tire for any thing that might have caused the flat. In the first part where I mentioned trying to locate the puncture by inflating and listening for air escaping from the tube, if the puncture was on the outside circumference of the tube then the pointy culprit that was responsible for the puncture is probably still in the tire and needs to be located and removed, otherwise you'll just have to repair or replace another tube all over again.
If your tube had a blowout rather than a normal puncture, you need to find and fix the reason before going further because that can be extremely dangerous, especially at high speeds.

Quote, I had one old tube with probably more than 20 patches on it before it gave up the ghost."
Don't mean to hijack but op may need to know this to. Since you have such good luck, would you explain your exact patching technique? I have tried to learn to patch tubes and have little to no luck. I follow the directions to a "T" but no luck with glueless or glued patches. Most recently with 3 tubes of the 28x45c tire size. After patching, I check the tube just as you described but when I replace and blow up the tube to the recommended pressure of 70psi, usually at about 50-60 psi, the patch will fail. Sometimes the pin hole is on a seam so I try to really buff it down till the seam goes away and only use glued patches that have set over night. Still no luck. Just can't get to the 70 psi mark. It's like the tube streches but the patch wont so it fails.
Thanks,
Tony

cyccommute 08-19-12 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jethro56 (Post 14624213)
Having really good luck with Pasela Tour Guard in a 35X700c size. Reasonable all around performance and value priced. paid $22 ea.

The 700C version won't work. E_S_Chill needs 27" tires. Panaracer does make the Pasela Tour Guard in 27" but they may be harder to find and/or a special order.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tony N. (Post 14624367)
Quote, I had one old tube with probably more than 20 patches on it before it gave up the ghost."
Don't mean to hijack but op may need to know this to. Since you have such good luck, would you explain your exact patching technique? I have tried to learn to patch tubes and have little to no luck. I follow the directions to a "T" but no luck with glueless or glued patches. Most recently with 3 tubes of the 28x45c tire size. After patching, I check the tube just as you described but when I replace and blow up the tube to the recommended pressure of 70psi, usually at about 50-60 psi, the patch will fail. Sometimes the pin hole is on a seam so I try to really buff it down till the seam goes away and only use glued patches that have set over night. Still no luck. Just can't get to the 70 psi mark. It's like the tube streches but the patch wont so it fails.
Thanks,
Tony

Applying a patch to a tube is relatively simple but it's easy to mess up. When you say that you let the glued patches set overnight, do you mean that you let the glue dry overnight and then applied the patch or that you applied the glue, applied the patch and then let the tube sit overnight? I suspect the latter.

For success in patching tubes, first get good patches. Personally I only ever use Rema Tip Top. I've had to use generic patches in the past and nearly every failure that I've experienced that wasn't me rushing the job has been from off-brand patches. Empty all the air out of the tube before you apply the glue and, especially, the patch Next, allow the glue to dry completely. You can't wait too long. If you allow the glue to sit overnight or over a weekend or over a year, you haven't waited too long. (Okay, over a year is a bit long:rolleyes:) Once the glue is completely dry, peel the backing off the patch and try not to touch the glue on the tube or the patch surface, then press into place. It should hold now and you'll never be able to take the patch off.

Another place where you can have a failure is in not hitting the target. Small punctures are hard to detect and, after you've buffed the tube, they may be even harder. I pump my tubes up so that they are very large, then find the hole. Dipping the tube in water helps but, if you don't have water handy, 'kissing the tube' is another way of detecting leaks. Run the tube close to your lips and feel for the air coming out of the tube. Your lips are extremely sensitive to air movement.

Finally, once you have located the leak, mark it. I use a small Sharpie and make a big X on the inflated tube. I even recheck the hole to ensure that it is centered on the X. The reason for a big X is that the X will get smaller when you deflate the tube. Now buff over the X, glue over the X, allow the glue, and put the patch over the X.

Before you put the tube back into the tire, make sure you clear the sharp object first. Run your fingers carefully (because you don't want to cut your fingers) around the inside of the tire and feel for the sharp point of what caused the puncture. If you don't want to run your fingers around the inside of the tube, carry a cotton ball. The cotton will catch on the object and leave cotton strands on the point without leaving your blood on it:eek:

One more trick is to 'clock' your tube. Align the valve stem with the label on the tire. I sometimes...I get lazy...mark the inside of the tube with an arrow indicating direction of rotation and the letters DS to indicate drive side. This way you can line up the tube (while the glue is drying) and find the object that caused the puncture more easily.

E_is_Chill 08-19-12 04:15 PM

cyccommute - Good to know, thanks Tony for bringing it up. The panaracer pana pasela tour gaurds seem to get a lot of appreciation after doing some searching in the forums. But, would anyone else have any other tires to consider?

Are any of kenda's tires any good 27x1 1/4 or 1/8?

Also, any recommendations for 32-36 spoke wheels?

Black wallnut 08-19-12 05:50 PM

For a wheel find a local builder that understands the needs of clydes. 32 will work, 36 may be better. A good quality hand built wheel will last many trouble free miles. A machine built wheel may be less money, or may not depending on what you buy and may or may not last as long. For a front wheel odds are machine built will be fine, for a rear wheel some clydes, myself included have not had good luck with machine built wheels.

jethro56 08-19-12 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 14624515)
The 700C version won't work. E_S_Chill needs 27" tires. Panaracer does make the Pasela Tour Guard in 27" but they may be harder to find and/or a special order.

Well Duh.... http://www.ebikestop.com/panaracer_p...ead-TR2304.php


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