Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   6'5 Long legs Bike needed! (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/845422-65-long-legs-bike-needed.html)

fusiongtx 09-10-12 09:53 PM

6'5 Long legs Bike needed!
 
I currently have a campania 1970's bike (maybe early 80's?). Its a 60cm, but i fear Im a 65 maybe a 66cm.

The trouble is, I have a nice Kona (jake the snake) Cyclecross bike at home. I did not take this with me to california as I do not want it to get stolen. Im looking for a 1985 or newer road bike that I can spend no more than $400 on.

A nice bike that I dont have to worry about it being eyballed to get stolen, but at the same time good enough for me to kick some ass.

I live in Los angeles, im 6'5 206lbs.

Any help on bikes?


*edit* the bike im on is a 60cm, no wonder it feels strange.

Beachgrad05 09-10-12 09:56 PM

Craigslist

fusiongtx 09-10-12 10:13 PM

Found this one. http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac...262901407.html

Comments?

jsigone 09-10-12 10:25 PM

this wouldn't be too bad
http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac...260722928.html

or project?
http://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst...208197055.html

fusiongtx 09-10-12 10:41 PM

Smallest I would go is 64, even then. I think a 64 isnt my size....im 6'5 and 3/4... I really think I need a 65cm/66cm

jsigone 09-10-12 11:01 PM

go test ride them before you narrow your sizes down. Test ride even new ones and use the specs for shopping...

ksisler 09-13-12 08:54 AM

Your height isn't the driver for frame size...it is your inseam measurement. You inseam is likely in the 34-36 inch range and yes that is likely to drive you to an ideal frame that is a bit bigger that a 64cm. Probably a 66cm or so. Can be hard to find off the self. At 206lbs, you are not really heavy for your height. Given your $400 limit, I think you are really limited to a lucky find of a used, custom built complete bike (they exist and do come up for sale here and there...) or living with a 64cm equipped with upright bars... Best place to find one of those off the shelf is to look for a hybrid bike, such as an XL size hybrid on www.bikesdirect.com Should be several there in the $400 range.

195cranky 09-13-12 08:05 PM

Long time lurker, first time poster, and a clydesdale at 6'5" 210 pounds who rides more than posts on forums...but this one finally made me register to hopefully help fellow clyde looking for a bike in LA. I have an inseam that is almost 37 inches long. I ride 60 cm frames and can ride a 61 or 59 depending on actual measurement used for frame sizing. A 120 stem and a some seat post showing on a 60 cm frame should work for you. No need to buy a hard to find used big frame - if they even make 64 or 65 or 66 cm frames back then. Now a days lucky to see 63 in a road bike and unless you are a mega tall clyde it may be a too huge frame for you. If you can locate a 60 try it out if possible but even that can be a slim market since most riders are frustrated horse jockeys or just climbing monkeys.

Of course, crank length may determine seat post capability with the shorter crank arm needing a higher seat post. I ride 195 cranks and obviously can lower the seat post for proper seat height and fit. If you have long arms you may need a bigger frame or longer top tube for comfort but a 130 stem can help in this regard if you can find an older used bike as desired with some part swap choices.

Good luck in your search but don't limit yourself to huge frames when a 59 to 61 may do the trick.

Gravity Aided 09-14-12 04:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 195cranky (Post 14728574)
Long time lurker, first time poster, and a clydesdale at 6'5" 210 pounds who rides more than posts on forums...but this one finally made me register to hopefully help fellow clyde looking for a bike in LA. I have an inseam that is almost 37 inches long. I ride 60 cm frames and can ride a 61 or 59 depending on actual measurement used for frame sizing. A 120 stem and a some seat post showing on a 60 cm frame should work for you. No need to buy a hard to find used big frame - if they even make 64 or 65 or 66 cm frames back then. Now a days lucky to see 63 in a road bike and unless you are a mega tall clyde it may be a too huge frame for you. If you can locate a 60 try it out if possible but even that can be a slim market since most riders are frustrated horse jockeys or just climbing monkeys.

Of course, crank length may determine seat post capability with the shorter crank arm needing a higher seat post. I ride 195 cranks and obviously can lower the seat post for proper seat height and fit. If you have long arms you may need a bigger frame or longer top tube for comfort but a 130 stem can help in this regard if you can find an older used bike as desired with some part swap choices.

Good luck in your search but don't limit yourself to huge frames when a 59 to 61 may do the trick.

195 cranks- is pedal drag a problem on turns ?

ClemY 09-14-12 05:18 AM

With the long seatposts now available, I find that seat tube length is much less important. What is important for me is the top tube length. When I look at candidates I am considering, I look at the top tube, then the seat tube. My most recent acquisition has a fairly short seat tube, but the top tube length is perfect. My long seat post just provides me with nice top tube clearance.

SteveSGP 09-14-12 05:38 AM

I'm 6'6" and I've found that I can't get comfortable on anything smaller than about a 65cm frame and my favorite bike is my plain jane old Raleigh Super Grand Prix.

I also have knee troubles so I'm very sensitive to sizing when it comes tro bikes due to knee pain.

Hi ten steel and a bit heavy but super comfortable, cheap and say what you want about modern bikes but I typically have no trouble keeping up with or riding faster than people on modern lightweight stuff.

It's not all about the bike, it's got more to do with the rider than anything.

This is my commuter and long distance bike. It's a 68cm.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...s/DSC05081.jpg

This is my backup which still need some sorting to get it comfortable because as it sits it hurts my knees, it's a 65cm.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...s/DSC07887.jpg

Sasquatch16 09-14-12 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 195cranky (Post 14728574)
Long time lurker, first time poster, and a clydesdale at 6'5" 210 pounds who rides more than posts on forums...but this one finally made me register to hopefully help fellow clyde looking for a bike in LA. I have an inseam that is almost 37 inches long. I ride 60 cm frames and can ride a 61 or 59 depending on actual measurement used for frame sizing. A 120 stem and a some seat post showing on a 60 cm frame should work for you. No need to buy a hard to find used big frame - if they even make 64 or 65 or 66 cm frames back then. Now a days lucky to see 63 in a road bike and unless you are a mega tall clyde it may be a too huge frame for you. If you can locate a 60 try it out if possible but even that can be a slim market since most riders are frustrated horse jockeys or just climbing monkeys.

Of course, crank length may determine seat post capability with the shorter crank arm needing a higher seat post. I ride 195 cranks and obviously can lower the seat post for proper seat height and fit. If you have long arms you may need a bigger frame or longer top tube for comfort but a 130 stem can help in this regard if you can find an older used bike as desired with some part swap choices.

Good luck in your search but don't limit yourself to huge frames when a 59 to 61 may do the trick.

I don't quite agree with this. I am 6'4 with a 37" cycling inseam. I bought a 63" frame bike because it is the largest I could find and yes I can adjust seat post for pedals but drop to handlebars is unbearable. Granted I am 53 and probably not as flexible as I would like but ended up getting a 45 Deg x 120mm stem to get bars up. They are now about 2" lower than seat and bearable. Next bike I get I will definitely try and find larger frame. I may even have a frame built and buy a good component bike from Bikes Direct and move everything over. I want to get another year of seat time to see if I loosen up any before going this route.

michaeljw 09-14-12 07:09 PM

Look out for the Cannondale Saeco3 in a 66cm with Campo and a carbon fork. I found one on ebay for 280. I'm 6'8" with 37" inseam and it's easily big enough for me.

LarDasse74 09-15-12 12:18 AM

Don't get too hung up on the 'number' of the frame size. As 195 cranky and FORDSVTPARTS have unintentionally pointed out, different bikes are measured differently. And modern bikes with a sloping top tube cannopt be directly compared to older bikes with level top tubes.

For instance: my old road bike is a 64cm and it fits great. I worked in a shop that made their own brand of bikes and the 57cm was the XL road bike, and it fit too. Trek makes some of the 2000 or 2.x (whatever they call them now) series in a 64 cm frame, and I'll bet those are damn big. Other companies make big bikes, too.

Also keep in mind that long legs means you have a relatively short torso... leg length is handled by raising the seatpost, and since you have a relatively short torso you probably don't need a super long top tube and stem. THe main problem you will have is getting the bars high enough relative to the saddle... a stem with some rise, or a new fork on which you can fit some spacers, could help you with this.

A couple other bikes I recall were made in big frames: Salsa Fargo (touring bike, not racing) and Specialized Sequoia (road sport).

Also Soma makes a couple really big frames (smoothie?), but the frame alone will likely blow your budget unless you find one used. I'll bet you could find a bike that is even a better fit than your Kona if you are patient.

bigfred 09-15-12 12:29 AM

The most important measurement for me has become stack height. 400mm seatposts can provide adequate seat height on a large range of frames. Aheadset stems available in everything from 60-140mm open up top tube limitations. However, at the expense of effecting handling via weight distribution. But, it's stack height that seems to be the limiting factor for me. I need the bars high enough and far enough away that I don't bang my knees into my elbows. I've had a couple of lbs saleskids try to convince me that they can fit me on a 58. They only way I can accommodate the increased drop to the bars, is by moving them closer (less reach). Which results in the dreaded knee/elbow interference. I can understand the OP's thoughts that he needs a reasonably large frame. At 6'5" and a 955mm cycling inseam I can't consider anything less than about 63cm with a 60cm TT. Anything less doesn't seem to support the 64cm of stack height that I need.

fusiongtx 09-15-12 08:21 PM

I have a 37-38 in inseam. Im thinking about purchasing one of these bikes. the medici I can get for $350, the bianchi for $275.

The only kicker is, I need a bike to ride to class for this last year, and im afraid the campagnolo stuff will get ripped off (even though i only lock my bike up for short periods of time on campus). I dont have that many classes.


medici 65cm : http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac...262901407.html $350

bianchi 64cm : http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv...274274609.html $275


I think I might try to grab the bianchi tomorrow. Unless others have anything to comment on? I am riding a 60cm bike right now that is too small, that someone is ready and willing to pay me $165 for.

bigfred 09-15-12 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fusiongtx (Post 14735649)
I have a 37-38 in inseam. Im thinking about purchasing one of these bikes. the medici I can get for $350, the bianchi for $275.

The only kicker is, I need a bike to ride to class for this last year, and im afraid the campagnolo stuff will get ripped off (even though i only lock my bike up for short periods of time on campus). I dont have that many classes.


medici 65cm : http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac...262901407.html $350

bianchi 64cm : http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv...274274609.html $275


I think I might try to grab the bianchi tomorrow. Unless others have anything to comment on? I am riding a 60cm bike right now that is too small, that someone is ready and willing to pay me $165 for.

Of the two, I like the medici more. But, I would be surprised if either lasted long on a campus. The Campy parts of the medici will make it a target and the Bianchi name will probably do the same. The bianchi certainly appears to be in better shape, but, doesn't have nearly the component spec.

fusiongtx 09-15-12 08:58 PM

Ill take the chances someone wont take an angle grinder and cut my u-lock, over coming up to my bike and stealing the components. Which in my mind, they wont mess with the bianchi since is sakae(spelling?), and suntour acu-shift. While the medici has campagnolo stuff.

Or maybe I just keep waiting?

michaeljw 09-17-12 02:32 AM

Get the Medici, it should be a much better ride than the aluminium Bianchi.

bigfred 09-17-12 02:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by michaeljw (Post 14739843)
Get the Medici, it should be a much better ride than the aluminium Bianchi.

I'm pretty sure that the "lugged" Bianchi is steel. I believe the seller was only referring to all the components being aluminum.

jsigone 09-17-12 10:33 AM

I'd take that bianchi @ 275. Looks like it ready to roll and looks to be equipped with Shimano 600 or similar. Hard to make out from the low res photos.

The rear cog of the medici looks tiny, beach route only? LOL

sheyn 09-17-12 01:21 PM

Im 6'8, with almost 39in inseam..You don not have to rely on the frame size. I own two bikes, SE lager 62 frame size, with 120mm stem and 35mm seatpost. This is my city bike which I love to ride. It used to be a tad small for me yet with few modifications it does the job.
Other frame is Fuji Rubaix 2005 64cm. This frame itself is much bigger and all I had to do is minor adjustments in order to feel comfortable on it.
Good luck with bike search.

195cranky 09-17-12 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravity Aided (Post 14729447)
195 cranks- is pedal drag a problem on turns ?

My TT bike has a 70 mm Bottom Bracket (BB) drop and while racing I do ocassionally peg out in some twisties. But as long as I remind myself and am not in a fog or seeing too much red I rarely have problems. I do have to coast through a few turns but not a deterrent from using the very effective 195 crank length for my size.

My road bikes have 67 and 65 BB drops and I have yet to peg out. But I do have to be aware and can't pedal through some corners that take some lean to get through.

My next road bike, be it custom or factory made, will probably have 63 or less BB drop so I can pedal corners with less worry if I when I race crits.

Again, only a problem on lower BB drop frames, certain speeds and corners if pedaling, or if I zone out at speed and effort and try to pedal where I shouldn't.

195cranky 09-17-12 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sasquatch16 (Post 14729791)
I don't quite agree with this. I am 6'4 with a 37" cycling inseam. I bought a 63" frame bike because it is the largest I could find and yes I can adjust seat post for pedals but drop to handlebars is unbearable. Granted I am 53 and probably not as flexible as I would like but ended up getting a 45 Deg x 120mm stem to get bars up. They are now about 2" lower than seat and bearable. Next bike I get I will definitely try and find larger frame. I may even have a frame built and buy a good component bike from Bikes Direct and move everything over. I want to get another year of seat time to see if I loosen up any before going this route.

Well that did not take but a few posts to have some one disagree with my first ever post. Here's one way of looking at frame sizing:

Performance/training/racing - if fitness and comfort/position/fit allow go as small as you can, max out seat post, longer stem if needed, slam stem if flexible and need for more aero positioning or deeper bars and drop, thus getting a shorter wheelbase, quicker, snappier and lighter bike. Think sports car.

Comfort/touring/endurance/centuries/commuting - by all means get a bigger frame for the longer wheelbase, cushier ride, less quirky performance, better comfort, less drop and reach cockpit, for medical /comfort/fit problem needs. Think SUV or Caddy.

But more often than not, when you see a clyde on a bike (trying to go fast versus farther?) the frame sometimes is way too big and they actually may have been able to go smaller. Some tall riders getting into the sport think that since they are tall they have to buy the biggest frame they can find. Not necessarily true and that was the purpose of my post.

Closing comment - hell of a lot easier to sell a large frame (59/60/61) vs. an xl (62/63) or xxl (64+) frame size and a lot easier to find 60's than 63's. But always buy and ride what fits and feels right especially if that makes you happy and keeps you riding.

brawlo 09-18-12 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sasquatch16 (Post 14729791)
I don't quite agree with this. I am 6'4 with a 37" cycling inseam. I bought a 63" frame bike because it is the largest I could find and yes I can adjust seat post for pedals but drop to handlebars is unbearable. Granted I am 53 and probably not as flexible as I would like but ended up getting a 45 Deg x 120mm stem to get bars up. They are now about 2" lower than seat and bearable. Next bike I get I will definitely try and find larger frame. I may even have a frame built and buy a good component bike from Bikes Direct and move everything over. I want to get another year of seat time to see if I loosen up any before going this route.

Sasquatch, you hit the nail right on the head here. If you have are of a taller height, there will be an inherent problem with your handlebar height. This comes from almost all off the shelf bikes only having a steerer that is 300mm long. There are very few forks that come with anything longer, and those that do can cost more than a frame on its own. Even just buying one of the extra long steerer forks isn't a good fix as carbon steerers like what's on Zinn's current offerings should only be a certain amount extended from the head tube. A bigger frame with taller head tube is necessary in the end and the options are few and pricey (except for say the KHS if it fits). A lot of tall people tend to overlook or forget the steerer factor or seat to bar drop when looking for a new bike. I am flexible in my relative youth at 34 and have no problems with my current bike, although I'm looking for a longer top tube on my next ride to reign in the stem length a little. I currently have the stem (adjustable) at 0 and right at the top of a 300mm steerer. The sacrifice is having a lot of weight over the front instead of on the seat where it should be.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:46 AM.