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Thread: Upgraded Wheels

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    Upgraded Wheels

    Hello all, new to the forum but not biking. I have a Trek 1500 with Bontrager Race Lites and my bike shop guy is having a hard time keeping the rear true. I am a bigger rider (6'4 250) and my bike is a 63cm Alloy. He is saying I need a stronger wheel.

    Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on wheels for bigger riders.

    Thanks
    Mike

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    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    How many spokes do those have, 18 in the rear? Yikes.

    There are plenty of wheels that can support your weight - what's your budget and how good is your wheel builder?

    The standard response you'll get around here is to get some 32 hole hubs like Shimano 105 or something, and some 32 hole Velocity Deep V rims and get somebody who knows what they're doing to build them up. You can also order them from somewhere like prowheelbuilder.com.

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    Would like to keep the budget within reason, but not looking for a standard $120 wheel replacement. This will be the most work this bike has had since I owned it, it has been that solid. So I don't mind spending a few dollars on a nice wheel and gonna do gearset and chain as well. I also looked at the whole new bike thing but still have the drama of upgrading wheels.

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    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    about $500 is where you can get some pretty good off the rack wheelset mostly geared to be lighter and aero (low spoke counts) or go full custom to get both plus more strength. Velocity deep V or Kinlin xr300 hoops is what I'd recommend, on either Ultegra or White industries hubs and nice double butted spokes. If your wallet has the space then Sapim CXray spoke are KING for lightness, strength and aero

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    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    We just bought my wife a Cannondale Quick 3 and are quickly realizing the wheels are going to have to go. I don't know what it's called, but it looks like it's a very low spoke count wheel, however, each spoke position has two spokes, one going to each side of the hub. This means that there isn't a lot of metal material at each spoke position. That ain't gonna last long. Plus, the brake pads were fouled with aluminum shavings after two short rides (total of about 25 miles). Took it back to the LBS and he cleaned them out, and said unless we go to Kool Stops, this will probably keep happening. WHAT? We've ridden two more rides and sure enough, they're grinding again. So, we're going the Kool Stop route. However, I think we'll just go ahead and get her a wheelset that will be dependable and she can move to the next bike, too.

    I like:

    http://www.boydcycling.com/vitesse-alloy-clincher/
    http://www.williamscycling.com/Wheel...m-30X_p_9.html

    but honestly, several here, including Mr. Beanz have spoken so highly of a Velocity A23 or Deep V hoop with an Ultegra hub. Wheelset should come in at about $300 for parts then find someone who can build it. I would think a solid set of clyde wheels for under $400 is very doable.
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    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Here's a very similar thread with similar questions.

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-down-the-road

    Really you can do whatever you want depending on your wallet. The Deep V rims work out a little heavier than fancy wheels but it's not a dramatic difference and there is NOTHING worse than busting a spoke and having to walk home 7 miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6 speed v View Post
    Hello all, new to the forum but not biking. I have a Trek 1500 with Bontrager Race Lites and my bike shop guy is having a hard time keeping the rear true. I am a bigger rider (6'4 250) and my bike is a 63cm Alloy. He is saying I need a stronger wheel.

    Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on wheels for bigger riders.

    Thanks
    Mike
    You're in the same pickle that I found myself in in 2008 when I also went with a Trek 1.5. Overall, I didn't regret it, but the wheelset that comes stock on that bike just flat out won't work for a heavier rider. I even upgraded the rear wheel to a slightly stiffer Bontrager and that too was having to be re-trued all the time. That was my only experience with Bontrager wheels, but it led me to believe they're just not that good unless you shell out big bucks for their top of the line models. Contrast them with DT Swiss and loads of others where you can get good wheels without paying a fortune.

    I've since upgraded bikes and the stock set was the DT Swiss Tricon R1700s and I absolutely love them.

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    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
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    My money went to a 36 hole Velocity Fusion with a 105 hub, don't remember the spoke gauge laced 3 cross built by my LBS. I weigh somewhere close to 235 and now have 3000 miles plus on the wheel with no issues. With trade-in of my stock wheel I was near $250. On my hybrid a year ago I had them order a hand built 32h Velocity Dyad with Deore hubs for about the same money plus a trade-in wheel. In both cases I have a great wheel and have had zero problems since. IMHO Clydes are much better off in having wheels built for them than rolling the dice on a off the shelf machine built wheel.


    Mark

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    32 or 36 spoke hubs. Shimano Tiagra, 105 or Ultegra. If you want to spend the coin on something fancier and with sealed bearings White Industries or Chris King's with the steel freegub body uprgrade.

    Laced 3 cross with just about any selection of high quality stainless spokes ranging from straight 14 gauge (2.0 mm) to 14/15 double butted spokes, or even triple butted 13/14/15. At 250lbs. and having built up a couple wheels for myself at this point, I'm favouring heavier spokes on the drive side than the non-drive side.

    Any number of Velocity rims will provide reasonably life expectancy at 32 spoke count or greater. Deep V's are the most frequently referenced, but, synergy's, A23, etc. should also work fine. DT Swiss 585's are another option and one that I've just recently started using myself. I've got about 3,000km on them since April and so far so good. There are other rims out there that will work, but, the aforementioned are the most popular on this forum.

    All the aforementioned is presuming that you're primarily looking for a "solid training wheel". Something that doesn't need to be flash, but, need to be consistantly reliable and ridable over a long period. If you want to spend more money, you are concerned with appearances, have a great appreciation for owning highly engineered systems or are motivated to ride more by having a blinging set of wheels, there are plenty of other options out there.

    Above all else: The ultimate durability of your custom built wheels will not be determined as much by the component choice as by the quality and attention to detail exhibited during the build. Frequent stress releaving, the forming of outside spoke elbows to the flange and attention to even and moderately high spoke tensions will have more to do with your wheels success than what they are built from. Find an excellent "wheelsmith" in your area.
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