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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-02-12, 01:16 AM   #1
Big Pete 1982
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How often do you buy a new bike?

So I started out about a year and a half ago on a Cannondale CAAD9 with all Tiagra components. I didn't know if I would enjoy riding so I got that bike because the research I did led me to the CAAD and I got a good price on it since it was a previous years model. I really enjoyed riding, but wasn't a fan of the Tiagra components or the triple crankset. So after a few months and maybe 500 miles, I sold that bike and bought a CAAD10 with all Ultegra components. I'm still riding the CAAD10 and I like it a lot. I have close to 3000 miles on it this year. But I have to admit, now that I know I really enjoy riding and I've lost a ton of weight doing it, I'm tempted to get a carbon bike for the added comfort. I don't really have the cash right now anyways, so it's just a thought.

So this made me wonder, how often do you guys get a new bike?
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Old 10-02-12, 03:06 AM   #2
jolly_ross
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I work as a Bike Mechanic for love, and in IT for money.

In my IT capacity sometimes people ask me "How often should I do a backup". The industry standard answer is "Whenever you think of it"

See where I'm going here? ; )
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Old 10-02-12, 04:18 AM   #3
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lol.

You can find love without carbon. Trust me.
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Old 10-02-12, 05:00 AM   #4
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Let's see. I bought my first bike while in college in 1975 (Motobecane Mirage). Then a better one a year or so after getting out of college, in 1979 (Sekai 2100). Then my first actual racing bike in 1984 (Gitane Tour de France). Then upgraded that to Trek's second-generation aluminum in 1989 (1500). So for that time period, it was about every 4 or 5 years. Then I didn't buy another one until I got an entry-level Fisher mountain bike around 2006 or so. And then finally an up-to-date road bike in 2011 (Cannondale Synapse 5 Alloy).

So except for a 17-year dry spell in the middle there, I've been getting new bikes about every 5 years it looks like.
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Old 10-02-12, 05:34 AM   #5
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First bike was a Al/Tiagra as well, but compact double. I rode it for about 3 years and 12-13Kmiles.

Then I moved to Ti/Ultegra. Was the right balance for me between comfort and reliable performance. The carbon bikes felt to much like my Al bike. I can't imagine it'll be a hard sell for any bike, and certainly not some off the shelf taiwanese mass produced carbon bike trumping my love of my etched and personalized Ti. So I expect far more than 3 yrs this time about.
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Old 10-02-12, 06:06 AM   #6
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Statistically, about every four years. I bought my first bike (hybrid) in 1995, a Raleigh touring bike in 1996 (sold it 6 months later...not for me), a Trek 7.2 FX in 2007 and a used 1995 hybrid (same make and model as my first bike but one size larger) in late 2011. The latest bike is my project and will be a Frankenbike when I'm done and probably the last bike I buy.
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Old 10-02-12, 11:23 AM   #7
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I last bought a new bike in 1996 when I had nice Campagnolo components hung on a Litespeed titanium frame.

The fork, headset, stem, bars, brakes, and hubs have yet to wear out and remain original (to be pedantic that's not quite true - the brake return springs both wore out and failed due to fatigue although Campagnolo sells those separately so I didn't need to replace the brakes). The spokes and most of the nipples also date back to the 1990s but got replaced with the original rims (I did reuse them on the subsequent replacements). I also replaced the freehubs with 9 speed parts on that wheelset and another I use for cyclocross tires on snow days when I wore out my last 13-21 8 speed cassette and found Campagnolo had discontinued the combination. The seat post didn't wear out, but got replaced with a round one so I could use a post mounted rack.

If the economy improves and kids progress beyond their odyssey years I'll probably get a custom titanium frame welded with chain stays a bit longer to better accommodate a pannier commuting, long reach or cantilever brakes to clear fenders for more pleasant rides in the rain, lower bottom bracket than a cross frame, and travel couplers . I suppose that'd be like George Washington's axe which has had both handle and head replaced.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 10-02-12 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 10-02-12, 11:39 AM   #8
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It's not a schedule thing for me, it's a "when there's a need to fill" thing. And the carbon bike has done a fantastic job of filling the need I got it for; I don't see myself buying another road bike.
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Old 10-02-12, 12:17 PM   #9
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I am averaging one bike a year for myself since 2008. If I add in the rest of the family is is closer to 1.5 bikes. I don't see any new additions for a while, but I have said that before.
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Old 10-02-12, 12:32 PM   #10
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As often as I can get away with, and remain married.
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Old 10-02-12, 01:05 PM   #11
Big Pete 1982
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It's not a schedule thing for me, it's a "when there's a need to fill" thing. And the carbon bike has done a fantastic job of filling the need I got it for; I don't see myself buying another road bike.
What was your reason for going carbon? Comfort? Weight?
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Old 10-02-12, 01:30 PM   #12
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Bought a Worksman on a lark over 4 years ago, never really liked it, rode it less and less. Bought a Redline Monocog singlespeed mountain bike this spring to get back into biking, discovered that I loved it. Went out to Santa Monica for a month before and after Burning Man. Rode a city bike around SM, and a cruiser non-stop around BM. Eventually realized I wanted a second bike with gears and a rack for more commuting and longer distance riding compared to my "fart around the local parks and trails" mountainbike, so I just bought a Long Haul Trucker.

So, if everything goes according to plan, 4 years ago, then 2 bikes this year, then no new bikes for a long, long time. I think the single speed rigid mountain bike + touring bike combo is a nice one, and serves my needs well
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Old 10-02-12, 06:20 PM   #13
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If you want comfort go with a steel fork and wider tires.
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Old 10-02-12, 06:32 PM   #14
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I started riding off road when I was 15 (~1990 or so) on a hand-me-down I got from my brother. My first new mtb I got a year later after I started my first job in a shop. I broke and replaced a couple of frames on that one but it stuck around in one form or another until ~1997 when I got another new bike - a GT Karakoram. Same story - a broken frame or two replaced and I am still riding the remnants of that bike 15 years later. Pretty much every component has been changed (Except for the shifters), but I honestly say I have not had a new mtb since 1997.

As for road bikes, I got a new one when I was ~12 ('87), it got stolen and replaced, then I got another new bike in 1992, and that is still my only road bike.
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Old 10-02-12, 06:37 PM   #15
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One year I bought four bikes (the bike shop loved me that year). That was before a wife, kids, braces, tutition, mortgages, co pays, furnace repairs, etc.............................................now I dream of it often!
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Old 10-02-12, 07:02 PM   #16
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If you are looking to upgrade from that frame and components be careful. Yes a carbon bike may result in more comfort but may not. The Caad 10 is arguably the best production AL frame made and many lower end carbon that cost more wont compare.
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Old 10-02-12, 08:10 PM   #17
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Yes a carbon bike may result in more comfort but may not.
I've gone from a Trek 1500 to a CAD3 Cannondale (most riders whine about the stiffness) to a Lemond Tourmalet, to a lemond Chambery toa full carbon Madone. Thank goodness I didn't have to pay for the Madone full carbon, I would have been very disappointed.

The Lemond was by far a smoother ride and more comfortable. Mainly because of geo not material. Same wheels, rims and better tires, the Madone has more road buzz than my Lemond ever did.

Like I said, thank goodnes I didn't have to pay for the Madone.
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Old 10-02-12, 08:44 PM   #18
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I've gone from a Trek 1500 to a CAD3 Cannondale (most riders whine about the stiffness) to a Lemond Tourmalet, to a lemond Chambery toa full carbon Madone. Thank goodness I didn't have to pay for the Madone full carbon, I would have been very disappointed.

The Lemond was by far a smoother ride and more comfortable. Mainly because of geo not material. Same wheels, rims and better tires, the Madone has more road buzz than my Lemond ever did.

Like I said, thank goodnes I didn't have to pay for the Madone.

On the subject of wheels, I know I've read you post about Velocity Deep V wheels. I was wondering, is it all about durability, or do they ride a little nicer than lower end wheels? I currently ride Mavic Aksiums, and they seem pretty solid, but they are pretty heavy. The Deep V's didn't really seem to be much lighter. Just curious of your opinion.
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Old 10-02-12, 08:46 PM   #19
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If you are looking to upgrade from that frame and components be careful. Yes a carbon bike may result in more comfort but may not. The Caad 10 is arguably the best production AL frame made and many lower end carbon that cost more wont compare.
Well, if I bought a carbon bike, it would most likely be a Specialized Roubaix with Ultegra components. I may instead go the route of upgrading a few things like wheels and bars on my CAAD as it's been an awesome bike overall. I just would like to feel a little less of the road!
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Old 10-02-12, 09:20 PM   #20
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On the subject of wheels, I know I've read you post about Velocity Deep V wheels. I was wondering, is it all about durability, or do they ride a little nicer than lower end wheels? I currently ride Mavic Aksiums, and they seem pretty solid, but they are pretty heavy. The Deep V's didn't really seem to be much lighter. Just curious of your opinion.
Me, it's all about durability. Plus I like the stiffness of the wheel. feels responsive IMO. With lighter wheels they flet flimsy and flexy. Mavic OP's and a few others just didn't feel stiff and responsive to me.

I use to think about lighter wheels for climbing, special events blah blah blah. But back in 02-05 I actually trained for rides and the wheels did not hold me back one bit. I did some good times on organized climbing rides. Like 10,000 ft in 7:10 ride time 7:40 total time.

During training rides, I tried lighter few spoke wheels and the difference was zilch on "timed" uphill Time trial training rides.

After that, I gave up the idea of "event day wheels".
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Old 10-02-12, 10:24 PM   #21
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Me, it's all about durability. Plus I like the stiffness of the wheel. feels responsive IMO. With lighter wheels they flet flimsy and flexy. Mavic OP's and a few others just didn't feel stiff and responsive to me.

I use to think about lighter wheels for climbing, special events blah blah blah. But back in 02-05 I actually trained for rides and the wheels did not hold me back one bit. I did some good times on organized climbing rides. Like 10,000 ft in 7:10 ride time 7:40 total time.

During training rides, I tried lighter few spoke wheels and the difference was zilch on "timed" uphill Time trial training rides.

After that, I gave up the idea of "event day wheels".
Well I keep reading recommendations of getting wheels with 32 spokes. My Mavic Aksiums have 20 front and back and I started riding them at around 290lbs down to 240lbs where I am now. I've never had a single issue with them. I guess I wouldn't really know if a wheel felt "responsive" since these are the only wheels I've had other than the wheels on my previous CAAD, but those were crappy wheels for sure and I had lots of problems with them. I've done ok myself on some longer climbs. I don't necessarily feel like my wheels are preventing me from doing anything, just thought an upgrade might make the ride a little easier and/or more comfortable.
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Old 10-02-12, 10:30 PM   #22
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I've never had a single issue with them.
How many miles on the wheels? I got 20,000+ out of my first build, One MINOR true at 13,000 and lasted till the brake surface wore thin. I retired the wheel with safety concerns after the brake surface blistered, but the wheel was still perectly true.
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Old 10-02-12, 10:38 PM   #23
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How many miles on the wheels? I got 20,000+ out of my first build, One MINOR true at 13,000 and lasted till the brake surface wore thin. I retired the wheel with safety concerns after the brake surface blistered, but the wheel was still perectly true.
Almost 3000 miles now.
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Old 10-02-12, 10:46 PM   #24
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Almost 3000 miles now.
Not bad. The wheels I've had durability issues didn't usually arise till after 2000. When they did, it was all downhill fast!
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Old 10-02-12, 11:15 PM   #25
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I'm averaging a road bike per decade. Currently on a Caad 4. I'm due a new bike!

On the subject of wheels, add me to the 32h riders, purely for durability. 3000 is a reasonable amount of mileage, but, like Beanz I'll expect to get 20k plus out of my wheels.
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