Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    94
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Your opinion wanted = super clyde bile

    I am hunting for a 90s era steel frame as a platform for a super Clyde bike. Heavy duty frame, ultra high spoke count ans so on.

    Any sugestions as to other features I should ibclude?

    I found a co-op in my area that looks good. If I find a CL or yard sale bike or build one on a co-op frame it looks to be a great source of tech support and a way to learn more about keeping a bike in tune.

    I will give my self till the 2nd week in Jan to find something in the wild and if no joy then go for a co-op build.

    I would think that CL would get a influx of older bikes after Christmas.

    If I am hunting a 90s era steel frame no shocks (MTB?) are there any brands or model I shood keep an eye out for? I have been told of a

    Stumpjumper
    Trek 700-800s
    Trek 520
    Specialized Hardrock
    Surly Long Haul Trucker

    Please suggest others?

  2. #2
    Senior Member koolerb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Upstate NY
    My Bikes
    Giant, Mongoose, Cannondale
    Posts
    783
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Who's Clyde?

  3. #3
    Senior Member skilsaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Victoria, Canada
    My Bikes
    Cannondale t1, Koga-Miyata World Traveller
    Posts
    1,546
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To me, the best, as in strongest, bike would be a european steel delivery bike. Strongest wheels would be 40 spoke, built for a tandem.

    You've given yourself a short window of opportunity, but it is realistic. It may be six months or 3 years before you find a bike on CL that is your size and to your specifications.
    The one who has the most bikes wins.

  4. #4
    Senior Member koolerb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Upstate NY
    My Bikes
    Giant, Mongoose, Cannondale
    Posts
    783
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think most of the old 1990's name brand mountain bikes were pretty tough. I see them all over Craigslist here, including large frame bikes. Asking prices are low, $75 to $150 typically; so even if you do break the bike it's no big deal. LHT or Trek 520 will cost some bigger bucks. Don't count out Mongoose and Diamondback from that era. I'm no Clyde but I'm still riding my Mongoose Rockadile that I bought in 1993. It's been crashed multiple times, fell of the back of my car once and she's still straight. The tough part is finding something with a mid or better level compost group. Seems like most are lower middle, to bottom. But, a brand new 7/8 Alivio rear derailleur is like $25 to $35 so no big deal if the bike comes with something bottom of the barrel. Also, find something with a 1 1/8" steerer tube. 1" was common back then, I think mostly on lower end bikes. The 1" steerer tubes just look to skinny to be on a mountain bike.

    Also, my neighbor is a big guy and he just bought a Gravity mtn bike with disc brakes from bikesdirect.com at a great price; he loves it.

  5. #5
    Neil_B
    Guest
    The Surly and Trek 520 are NOT mountain bikes. They are touring bikes. In other words, bikes designed to haul a rider and gear.

  6. #6
    Senior Member epiking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    My Bikes
    '86 Miyata 1000, '85 Raleigh Elkhorn (retired), 2000 Specializer HardRock
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just finish a "Clyde" build of a Specialized Hardrock. So Far So good, but I only have a couple of hundred miles on it so far. Prior to that I was riding n 85 Raleigh Elkhorn (currently under maintenance).

    Also I did get away with a well built (DT alpine spoke) 36 spoke rear wheel. The failure I encountered was then axle related (bent), after an incident relating to a large pothole (traffic avoidance). In that time period I was well over 400 lbs.

    Your selections seem reasonable. Finding a bike that fits and adjusting/adapting it for comfort is a critical to the over all experience.

    Hope you find the same success in cycling that I have.
    1985 Raleigh Elkhorn
    1986 Miyata 1000
    2000 Specialized HardRock

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    RickBlane,

    At 5'11'' and 285, you do not need a heavy duty bicycle, just a good quality bicycle. Wheels with 32 or 36 spoke count are most important. Be prepared to spend time at a co-op and learn how to true your own wheels if you are low on cash.

    Unless you are doing a lot of off-road, suspension forks can be a problem for clydes. I have blown out a few and I do not like the bobbing and bottoming out.

    Mid to late 90's MTBs are readily available since many do not have suspension and are now "obsolete."

    Check out Craig's List, thrift stores, garage sales, etc. for 90's rigid mountain bikes.

    Quality brands to look for are:

    Trek
    Specialized
    Giant
    Gary Fisher
    Cannondale
    Jamis
    Kona
    Raleigh
    Novara
    Marin
    Fuji
    Bridgestone
    Bianchi
    Surly
    Rocky Mountain
    GT

    Schwinn is a double edged sword. Early models were good quality bikes but later models were sold at Walmart and are low quality. Better to avoid unless you know exactly what you are looking at.
    Old steel makes me squeal!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    RickBlane,

    Also, since you have a lot of credit at Sears, go and buy yourself a Craftsman ball-end metric hex key set.

    I do 90% of my bicycle maintenance with these.
    Old steel makes me squeal!

  9. #9
    Senior Member bud16415's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Erie Penna.
    Posts
    1,017
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here’s mine a $10 garage sale find. Added slicks new and donor rack and fenders from old junkers. A too small frame works if you get saddle up on a long seat post and riser bars and stem. The shorter top tube makes for a nice upright ride and the mountain wheels, frame and gearing are really strong.

    What's not in your legs needs to be in your gears.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Philly
    My Bikes
    IF SCJ SE, Surly LHT, BikeFriday NWT, Cannondale M300, Raleigh 700
    Posts
    4,365
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_B View Post
    The Surly and Trek 520 are NOT mountain bikes. They are touring bikes. In other words, bikes designed to haul a rider and gear.
    Yeah. And I don't believe the LHT was even introduced in the 90s.

    OP: None of those bikes you mention wil have "ultra high" spoke counts unless they were fitted with custom wheels. 36 max. Ultra high would be something like 40 or 48.

    And I thought you didn't have any money except store credit at Sears.

  11. #11
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    NW Minnesota
    Posts
    2,544
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Giant Yukon and Boulder are also possibilities, among many others already mentioned.

    I agree that you don't need a "super-clyde" setup as you aren't all that heavy. I've seen guys in the 350 lb range riding steel MTBs with stock 36-spoke wheels without too many problems. Just stay away from lightweight wheels with less than 32 spokes. One of the best investments you will make is to get your wheels properly trued and tensioned at a good LBS. Even entry level wheels will last a lot longer if the tension is even and within the proper range.

    In my mind, a "super-clyde" bike is something with a gussetted steel frame with 40+ spoke wheels with tandem hubs. At most, you may eventually have to look at getting a hand-built wheelset, if the stock wheels don't hold up. If you need new tires don't go narrower than about a 28mm width with something like a 35mm being fine for commuting and fitness riding. The higher volume tires actually take some of the stress of the wheels, especially when hitting bumps or on rough roads. Of course, once you start riding, you will likely lose some weight maybe even losing your Clyde status.
    Lead, follow or get out of the way

  12. #12
    Grammar Cop Condorita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Papa Smurf's Lair
    My Bikes
    in my sig line
    Posts
    1,543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by koolerb View Post
    Who's Clyde?
    And why are you looking for bile?
    That which does not kill me has made a massive tactical blunder.
    Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen. Louis L'Amour
    '07 Giant Cypress WSD "Radagast the Beige-and-Black" * '97 (?) Bianchi Premio "Orion" * '09 Trek Allant "The Black Pearl"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •