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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-24-13, 06:36 PM   #1
lostforawhile
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issues with toes hitting the ground

I guess I qualify as a Clydesdale, being over 6 foot and 200 pounds, I have an issue, I seem to have an issue with catching the toes of my big "hoof" on the ground. I have a vintage Schwinn with Atom pedals, I have no plans to go clipess, but today I nearly broke the toes on one of my feet, It may have something to do with having big feet and a bike with long crank arms, I have a set of nice vintage clips, I have to get straps for, would this be my best solution in keeping my toes back enough to not catch them? I usually keep my toes on the front of the pedals, but sometimes it's easy to forget
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Old 01-24-13, 07:19 PM   #2
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size 15 feet here, never caught my toes on the street...not sure what you are doing.

Is this only in corners?
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Old 01-24-13, 07:22 PM   #3
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Your foot should be nominally parallel to the ground, not pointed at the ground. Its way more common to hit the front tire with your toes, but thats become a normal risk for most diamond frame bikes, and yu learn not to do low speed steering when pedaling soon enough.
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Old 01-24-13, 07:24 PM   #4
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That's not good. You need bigger wheels or shorter crank arms; and quick. Go to your LBS and get a professional opinion on what the problem is.
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Old 01-24-13, 08:31 PM   #5
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If this is happening in turns, make sure your inside foot is in the up position...
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Old 01-24-13, 08:42 PM   #6
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If I'm picturing this properly, you must have the middle of your foot over the pedal spindle. As you come down on the pedal stroke, your heel should be down and then level out at the bottom of the stroke before being lifted at the back. Think of the bottom of the stroke as wiping your foot on the pedal. Your foot should not be in a toes down orientation until it is coming up the back side of the stroke. With the ball of your foot over the pedal spindle and a level bottom to your stroke, you should have no issues with your toes hitting the ground no matter how big your feet. Clips may help, but more important it keeping your foot in the proper place on the pedal. The pedal must remain under the forefoot, not the arch. You might have to do some seat and height adjustments until you get this right. As mentioned, inside pedal up in turns unless you must power through or are riding a fixie. If you do pedal through a turn and lean too much, your pedal would hit, not your foot.

Another thought, are you riding too small of a frame? That can make foot placement and proper pedal stroke difficult. You mentioned being over 6' and having big feet. Just how tall are you, what is your inseam and what is the standover on your bike?
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Old 01-24-13, 11:46 PM   #7
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I dont seem to have an issue if I'm not making a tight turn at low speed, such as turning around in a parking lot, it may be I've gotten in bad habits about foot positions, the Bike is 71 supersport, it's not a small bike, and it seems to work well for me, I may have to try these clips and see if they keep my toes back far enough to prevent this, that seem to be the issue, my foot is too far forward on the pedal
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Old 01-25-13, 12:06 AM   #8
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I still don't understand why your foot is pointed down? IT should be pointed forwards. Also, remember, ball of the foot over the axle of the pedal is the basic foot position.
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Old 01-26-13, 09:35 PM   #9
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Toe clips should take care of you. Get used to them loose before you try to tighten them. You may need spacers to get the ball of your foot over the pedal axle .
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Old 01-26-13, 10:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lostforawhile View Post
I dont seem to have an issue if I'm not making a tight turn at low speed, such as turning around in a parking lot, it may be I've gotten in bad habits about foot positions, the Bike is 71 supersport, it's not a small bike, and it seems to work well for me, I may have to try these clips and see if they keep my toes back far enough to prevent this, that seem to be the issue, my foot is too far forward on the pedal
I think foot position also might have a lot to do with it. When turning, whichever direction you are turning, the crank arm in the direction of your turn should be at 12 o'clock with the other side at 6 o'clock. Even at low speeds, this should be the case. In any case, what has already been mentioned about foot position on the pedal, and at what point of the rotation, is good advice!


Racer Turns the Corner at Giro di Burnaby 2007
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Old 01-27-13, 05:58 AM   #11
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You do not have to get clips with straps, you can try the "half clips," much like these:

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Old 01-27-13, 08:31 AM   #12
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You do not have to get clips with straps, you can try the "half clips," much like these:

+1.

My folding bike was my first bike where I couldn't put toe clips and it always felt weird.

I find that clipping in helps a lot, but if you I'd definitely start with toe clips and work my way up in your case.

Cheers,
Charles
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