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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-28-13, 02:36 AM   #1
MojojoM
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Down 40 Pounds - Up 20 Pounds

Winter is killing me. Even though I know what I need to do. It's seems impossible. I lost 40 pounds in about six months. I was riding almost every day (with few exceptions). Not only did I lose weight, but I was feeling better than I had in years. I haven't ridden twice since Novemeber. The weight is coming back much faster than it left. I can't stand the thought of putting the weight back on.

Someone give me a good hard smack.
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Old 01-28-13, 02:50 AM   #2
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Lets give each other a good hard smack, that way we both get back on the wagon.
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Old 01-28-13, 03:26 AM   #3
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Me too, it's very discouraging!
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Old 01-28-13, 06:20 AM   #4
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One option is to think of time off the bike as the time to dump weight. You can concentrate on strength training to preserve muscle mass when dumping the weight.

Or at least that is what I should have done last fall when I was off the bike and gained a few pounds.

Good luck guys!
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Old 01-28-13, 07:11 AM   #5
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Stationary bike for 40km every night as well as my 150km of commuting a week has kept me in shape - mostly. Gained about 1kg and I noticed that maintaining 30kmh over long distance is a little harder. Have to work on that.
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Old 01-28-13, 07:27 AM   #6
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SWACK ! ! !

I've had the same problem in years past but there are some things that helped me break the pattern:

- If you aren't riding or working out regularly, don't eat as if you were. I got so used to eating 2500+ calories a day when I was riding an average of two or more hours per day and was still losing weight, that it was hard to drop back to 1,800 calories just to maintain, but I had to do it. Even when I can ride in the winter, the rides are nowhere near as long, intense or frequent as they are during the summer months so I have to adjust my intake accordingly.

- You have to find some other physical activity to keep your metabolism up or even calorie cutting isn't going to hack it. If you park on the couch to wait for spring, not only aren't you burning calories on the bike, your basal metabolism will slow. This causes a vicious cycle of cutting calories > slower metabolism > cutting more calories > even slower metabolism. Pretty soon it gets hard to drag yourself off the couch. I started hitting the gym 3-5 times a week and do a variety of resistance and aerobic training including a lot of elliptical trainer and spin cycle. Other exercises that I mix in include free and machine weights, stair climber, power walking/running, and occassionally swimming. Even an hour of fast walking makes a big difference in how I feel and both the quantity and quality of food I crave. If you don't have a gym, even a basic trainer for your bike would be a good investment if you can't ride outdoors for extended periods. Yoga and Pilates are also good additions and there are several good video based programs aimed at beginners and others who aren't Cirque du Soleil gymnasts or contortionists.

- When you do have an upward fluctuation, don't stress out and obsess about it. I find that the more I focus on my weight, the more trouble I have controlling it. When I focus on getting enough sleep, preparing good meals, and getting some exercise (don't forget that active recreation is exercise too), the weight kind of takes care of itself.
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Old 01-28-13, 08:05 AM   #7
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Run. It's not nearly as fun, but it burns calories, it doesn't take nearly as long and you only need shoes.

I used to vary by 10-15 lbs between summer and winter. Now it's down to about 5.
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Old 01-29-13, 05:18 AM   #8
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Ok... Today I will at least get on the treadmill and get in the saddle for a minmum of an hour. I'm dreading this lke the plaque. Back in Novmember I was actually looking for hills and was doing pretty good for an old guy that had hip replacements 21 years ago. It took me months to get where I was. One thing that gives me hope is - I know I did it once - so I should be able do it again.

Thanks for the smack. I made need more...
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Old 01-29-13, 11:14 AM   #9
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Hang in there Mojo. You are not alone.
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Old 01-29-13, 11:23 AM   #10
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Ok... Today I will at least get on the treadmill and get in the saddle for a minmum of an hour. I'm dreading this lke the plaque. Back in Novmember I was actually looking for hills and was doing pretty good for an old guy that had hip replacements 21 years ago. It took me months to get where I was. One thing that gives me hope is - I know I did it once - so I should be able do it again.

Thanks for the smack. I made need more...

You aren't the only one starting over. Hang in there. And congratulations on the continued success of the joint replacements!
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Old 01-29-13, 06:45 PM   #11
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Thanks for the encouragement. It's odd being on this side. Now - I see how important it really is.

Neil - I never would have thought the replacements would have lasted this long. I was told to expect about twelve years. The implants were some of the first to use ceramic heads. Apparently they are holding up much better than anticipated. I had both hips done at the same time. I was 35 at the time and am hoping they will last until I'm 80+. I'm clicking on the link to you knee replacement info now. I sincerely hope and pray you have a similar experience to me.

Thanks again...

Last edited by MojojoM; 01-29-13 at 06:55 PM. Reason: corrected spelling
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Old 01-29-13, 07:02 PM   #12
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Thanks for the encouragement. It's odd being on this side. Now - I see how important it really is.

Neil - I never would have thought the replacements would have lasted this long. I was told to expect about twelve years. The implants were some of the first to use ceramic heads. Apparently they are holding up much better than anticipated. I had both hips done at the same time. I was 35 at the time and am hoping they will last until I'm 80+. I'm clicking on the link to you knee replacement info now. I sincerely hope and pray you have a similar experience to me.

Thanks again...
There are reports of people who had joint replacement four decades ago still maintaining an active life without any sign of needing revision. I have high hopes as I enter my 11th month post surgery. Thanks, and keep moving!
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Old 01-29-13, 07:05 PM   #13
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Run. It's not nearly as fun, but it burns calories, it doesn't take nearly as long and you only need shoes.

I used to vary by 10-15 lbs between summer and winter. Now it's down to about 5.
I definitley have to change my mindset. I was deteremined not to let teh weather affect my riding. I've been a year rounf motorcycle rider for many years. I've always been able to keep warm. Riding the bicycle is a bit different . I can only wear so much before restricting movement.

Running is not an option for me. I had hip replacements twenty-one years ago. I am going to start taking advantage of other avenues - walking - stationary bike - treadmill -etc. I was just convicned that I would be able to keep up my bike riding schedule throughout the winter. ----> Fail.

Last edited by MojojoM; 01-29-13 at 07:58 PM.
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Old 01-29-13, 10:24 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
SWACK ! ! !

I've had the same problem in years past but there are some things that helped me break the pattern:

- If you aren't riding or working out regularly, don't eat as if you were. I got so used to eating 2500+ calories a day when I was riding an average of two or more hours per day and was still losing weight, that it was hard to drop back to 1,800 calories just to maintain, but I had to do it. Even when I can ride in the winter, the rides are nowhere near as long, intense or frequent as they are during the summer months so I have to adjust my intake accordingly.

- You have to find some other physical activity to keep your metabolism up or even calorie cutting isn't going to hack it. If you park on the couch to wait for spring, not only aren't you burning calories on the bike, your basal metabolism will slow. This causes a vicious cycle of cutting calories > slower metabolism > cutting more calories > even slower metabolism. Pretty soon it gets hard to drag yourself off the couch. I started hitting the gym 3-5 times a week and do a variety of resistance and aerobic training including a lot of elliptical trainer and spin cycle. Other exercises that I mix in include free and machine weights, stair climber, power walking/running, and occassionally swimming. Even an hour of fast walking makes a big difference in how I feel and both the quantity and quality of food I crave. If you don't have a gym, even a basic trainer for your bike would be a good investment if you can't ride outdoors for extended periods. Yoga and Pilates are also good additions and there are several good video based programs aimed at beginners and others who aren't Cirque du Soleil gymnasts or contortionists.

- When you do have an upward fluctuation, don't stress out and obsess about it. I find that the more I focus on my weight, the more trouble I have controlling it. When I focus on getting enough sleep, preparing good meals, and getting some exercise (don't forget that active recreation is exercise too), the weight kind of takes care of itself.
Lots of good advice. I will do as you suggest.

Thanks
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Old 02-05-13, 12:58 PM   #15
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Thanks everyone. I've ridden several times and been on the treadmill a few times too. I'm definitely not in the shape I was in a few months ago, but it's not quite as bad as I thought. I'm going to bite off small chunks for a few weeks before adding much distance or speed. I'd like to be back to my 30 miles a day by April. If the weather stays above 40 I should't have a problem. I was hoping to do the Allegheny and C & O in late May. I may need to make a slight adjustment. Time will tell.

I'm pulling for ll of those in the same boat as me.

I cannot emphasize enough just how important this forum and each of you have been in my weight loss and mind clearing lifestyle change

Thanks again

Last edited by MojojoM; 02-06-13 at 01:13 AM. Reason: sp
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Old 02-06-13, 03:01 PM   #16
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Rode 20 miles today. The smacks - along with the encouragement helped. I'm a little sore, but I also feel much better.
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Old 02-06-13, 10:27 PM   #17
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Thanks everyone. I've ridden several times and been on the treadmill a few times too. I'm definitely not in the shape I was in a few months ago, but it's not quite as bad as I thought. I'm going to bite off small chunks for a few weeks before adding much distance or speed. I'd like to be back to my 30 miles a day by April. If the weather stays above 40 I should't have a problem. I was hoping to do the Allegheny and C & O in late May. I may need to make a slight adjustment. Time will tell.

I'm pulling for ll of those in the same boat as me.

I cannot emphasize enough just how important this forum and each of you have been in my weight loss and mind clearing lifestyle change

Thanks again
If you ride the C & O in late May be prepared for soggy conditions. Both times I've done it in late May or early June I've had to deal with mud.
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Old 02-07-13, 07:09 AM   #18
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If you ride the C & O in late May be prepared for soggy conditions. Both times I've done it in late May or early June I've had to deal with mud.
I'm open to other dates. I had heard that it could still be rather cold in March. I had read somewhere that mosquitoes were really bad in June. Of course that could have been one person's experience - once. I don't mind roughing it a bit, but I'd rather not be miserable due to the elements. I'd really like to do it after school is out for the summer so my kids can go with me. I have never had the opportunity to speak with someone that really knows the ropes from experience.

Any advice or input is more than welcome.
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Old 02-07-13, 08:16 AM   #19
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Have you tried yoga? I got into yoga / pilates when my back was bugging me -- I wanted to build my core. Winter is a good time to try it (front and side planks, downward facing dog, plus maybe get a ball for situps and combine destabilizing exercises). It won't burn as much as an hour or two of cardio, but it will tone your body, build flexibility and make it easier to be on the bike longer when the weather improves.

I got into it about 2 years ago, and now do one such workout a week to maintain.
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Old 02-07-13, 08:32 AM   #20
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I'm open to other dates. I had heard that it could still be rather cold in March. I had read somewhere that mosquitoes were really bad in June. Of course that could have been one person's experience - once. I don't mind roughing it a bit, but I'd rather not be miserable due to the elements. I'd really like to do it after school is out for the summer so my kids can go with me. I have never had the opportunity to speak with someone that really knows the ropes from experience.

Any advice or input is more than welcome.
Rain is the problem. The GAP drains quickly, but the C & O is dirt and becomes a mess. Yes, and there are bugs around, but you use bug repellent on yourself anyway, so they leave you alone.
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Old 02-08-13, 02:32 AM   #21
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Have you tried yoga? I got into yoga / pilates when my back was bugging me -- I wanted to build my core. Winter is a good time to try it (front and side planks, downward facing dog, plus maybe get a ball for situps and combine destabilizing exercises). It won't burn as much as an hour or two of cardio, but it will tone your body, build flexibility and make it easier to be on the bike longer when the weather improves.

I got into it about 2 years ago, and now do one such workout a week to maintain.
Thanks - I have a few friends that are into yoga, but really wasn't sure of the benefits. I'll check it out.
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Old 02-08-13, 02:36 AM   #22
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Rain is the problem. The GAP drains quickly, but the C & O is dirt and becomes a mess. Yes, and there are bugs around, but you use bug repellent on yourself anyway, so they leave you alone.
I'm primarily a road bike rider. I will need to get a different bike to make this trip. Would you recommend an hybrid or a mt bike?

Thanks again.

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Old 02-08-13, 05:56 AM   #23
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I'm primarily a road bike rider. I will need to get a different bike to make this trip. Would you reccomend an hybrid or a mt bike?

Thanks again.
Either will work. So will a touring bike like the Trek 520 or Surly LHT. Wider tires are generally recommended. I've ridden a hybrid with either 32s or 34s and had little trouble.

Here's a puddle two days after a rain on the C & O. This was taken outside White's Ferry.



Some of the C & O drains better than that - the stretches from Cumberland to Oldtown, Great Falls to DC, and around Harpers Ferry - but much of it is a muddy mess after a big rain. Here's a bike trailer after the 15 mile ride from Cumberland to Oldtown:



And my bike after that same rainy 15 miles.



Keep in mind for some stretches of the C & O there are paved alternatives. The Western Maryland Rail Trail runs alongside the C & O for 20 miles, 10 miles on either side of Hancock. From the WMRT you can continue on rolling roads, taking care to remain on the shoulder as Maryland law requires a bicyclist to be when the road is posted at 45MPH or higher, as far as Shepardstown, or if you like adventure Harpers Ferry. (Harpers Ferry Road is VERY steep.)
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