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  1. #1
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    Bike for fat cyclist

    At 200lbs 6'0, i feel like certain bikes might not suite me. My last bike (which was a cheapo diamondback for 350) ,which i took well care for cleaning weekly, is in need of a new chain, new tires, and maybe rims according to the techy i talked to. I also had a to replace multiple spokes during the measly 5 months i rode this bike. I did ride everyday but i barely averaged 30 miles 5 times a week in one day. I guess my question is, is my weight a concern or just that i got a very cheap bike(it was probably the cheapest rode bike they had)? If so what sort of bikes within the 1000-1500 range would you recommend? I would like something durable but still fast. Carbon frames may be out of the question though( i hear they are very fragile,even for skinny guys.)

  2. #2
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    200 lbs is featherweight for in here . $1500 budget, I would suggest an aluminum frame with 105 components and have a set of wheels built. The problem with your old bike wasn't your weight. It was just a cheap bike. I'm over 350 and have had 0 problems with my Cannondale road bike. I did put 36 spoke deepV wheels on it though.

  3. #3
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    200 lbs? I WISH!

    I went with a Specialized Secteur and started riding it when I was around 350, kept the stock wheels and everything. I did go into the shop every month and half to have them checked and have had zero problems so far. Down under 300 now and could not be happier with the purchase.

  4. #4
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    200 lbs shouldn't be an issue with OEM wheels, particularly if you "ride light" - avoid potholes, bumps and jumps as much as possible, and where you can't avoid them, get off your butt to allow your weight to be distributed more evenly between the front and rear wheels and absorb the shock with your legs. Just make sure you get the shop to retension the wheels after a couple hundred miles. You may be pleasantly surprised at how long they'll last. At the very least I'd give them a try - no point in spending money on replacements until you know you'll need them.
    Craig in Indy

  5. #5
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ltactics View Post
    At 200lbs 6'0, i feel like certain bikes might not suite me. My last bike (which was a cheapo diamondback for 350) ,which i took well care for cleaning weekly, is in need of a new chain, new tires, and maybe rims according to the techy i talked to. I also had a to replace multiple spokes during the measly 5 months i rode this bike. I did ride everyday but i barely averaged 30 miles 5 times a week in one day. I guess my question is, is my weight a concern or just that i got a very cheap bike(it was probably the cheapest rode bike they had)? If so what sort of bikes within the 1000-1500 range would you recommend? I would like something durable but still fast. Carbon frames may be out of the question though( i hear they are very fragile,even for skinny guys.)
    There are very few full size bikes that will not support somebody of 200 lbs. Carbon, aluminum, steel, whatever you want. Carbon is not that fragile, spending a lot more money to get a super light bike doesn't make sense for a lot of people here (*cough* *cough*); you can get carbon bikes in your price range (at BikesDirect.com, for example).

    I would recommend not going with super skinny tires (28mm on up should be fine). What I think you really want to concentrate on is what type of bike to get: road bike, cross bike, upright hybrid, mountain bike, recumbent bike, folding bike, penny farthing...

    I'd go to your local bike shop and see what feels good. And then do that.
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  6. #6
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    200 pounds and 6'0" barely gets you in the club

    If you want a new bike, pretty much anything not in the ultra-light category will work fine be it steel, aluminum, or carbon fiber. Honestly, the bike you have is probably fine if all it needs is a chain and tires, you expect to replace them every so often anyway. If you are popping spokes, the problem isn't your weight, it's the wheel build and your LBS should have been recommending a rebuild or new wheels after the first couple of spokes. Even entry level 32-spoke wheels can hold up well for a 200 pound rider if they are properly trued and tensioned. If it is time for new rims (another thing that needs replacement from time to time and doesn't mean the bike is shot) you might want to consider a mid-level wheelset and have your LBS do a full true and tension on them. Ride them for a couple hundred miles and then get them rechecked. After one recheck they should stay true with no popped spokes for many miles barring some kind of abuse or accident. If you are concerned about your weight being an issue, you can go to 36 double butted spokes on a double-wall rim with eyelets. The good thing about a good wheelset is that you can keep it and transfer it from bike to bike keeping the OEM entry level wheels for when you trade or sell the old bike. If it's a choice between good wheels on a mediocre bike and mediocre wheels on a good bike, go with the good wheels.
    Lead, follow or get out of the way

  7. #7
    Senior Member fettsvenska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
    200 pounds and 6'0" barely gets you in the club

    If you want a new bike, pretty much anything not in the ultra-light category will work fine be it steel, aluminum, or carbon fiber. Honestly, the bike you have is probably fine if all it needs is a chain and tires, you expect to replace them every so often anyway. If you are popping spokes, the problem isn't your weight, it's the wheel build and your LBS should have been recommending a rebuild or new wheels after the first couple of spokes. Even entry level 32-spoke wheels can hold up well for a 200 pound rider if they are properly trued and tensioned. If it is time for new rims (another thing that needs replacement from time to time and doesn't mean the bike is shot) you might want to consider a mid-level wheelset and have your LBS do a full true and tension on them. Ride them for a couple hundred miles and then get them rechecked. After one recheck they should stay true with no popped spokes for many miles barring some kind of abuse or accident. If you are concerned about your weight being an issue, you can go to 36 double butted spokes on a double-wall rim with eyelets. The good thing about a good wheelset is that you can keep it and transfer it from bike to bike keeping the OEM entry level wheels for when you trade or sell the old bike. If it's a choice between good wheels on a mediocre bike and mediocre wheels on a good bike, go with the good wheels.
    +1...this is good advice.

    Does the Diamondback fit you well? If so, and you don't want to fork over a ton of money for a new bike, a new wheelset and some proper adjustment might be the answer. 36 hole Sun CR18 rims laced to Shimano Tiagra or 105 hubs with DT Swiss Competition double butted 2.0/1.8 spokes would make for a very decent set of wheels.

    On the other hand, if you just want to get a newer and nicer bike, I get that too. Nothing wrong with that.

  8. #8
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
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    I started at 252 on an Aluminum Trek with 105s. 5500 miles later the wheels have not been touched nor has anything else.

  9. #9
    Carpe Velo Yo Spiff's Avatar
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    Sounds like there was a problem with your wheels. I'm a little over 200 now (have been close to 300) and I've ridden 32 spoke wheels on a road bike for 13 years before I finally broke a spoke last summer. After having the shop replace the spoke its been fine.

    Any well made bike should work just fine for you. I'd suggest deciding what kind of bike you want and then seeing what is available from an LBS that you trust.
    Last edited by Yo Spiff; 01-31-13 at 07:59 AM.
    2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '88 Trek 900, '92 Trek T100, 2000 Rans Tailwind

  10. #10
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    i agree, it sounds more like your wheels than your bike. If you are happy with the bike, you can upgrade the wheels. Since the bike is not a great bike, here is a link to a inexpensive option http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_506872_-1_ Here is a better wheel set for a little more http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hand-Built-S...item4d04f1f8b4

    Like the others have posted there are other options like having your bike shop build the wheels, you building the wheels or ordering a custom set. You need to decide if you want to upgrade the wheels or to go with a new bike.

    Do you like the bike shop, if so talk with them. If you are not happy with the bike, then upgrade it and talk to them about your wheels.

    If your a do it yourself kind of person. The internet could be an option. Keep in mind that you get no service with it and bikes that come from on line shops need adjustments and sometimes complete builds.

    Good Luck.

  11. #11
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    How often do good wheels usually last? Thx

  12. #12
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    You can get years out of them.

    I have a wheel set that is 20+ years old. I rode that bike/wheel set (hard) for 10+ years. I use them on my trainer now.

  13. #13
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    For big people, its all about the wheels. Get hand-built wheels or at least, get your factory wheels properly tuned up by a bike shop.

    I ride my handbuilts. My son who is just over 300 kept on breaking spokes and tacoed a couple of wheels. He is a masher and that doesn't help. He got a new Schwinn hybrid (700c wheels with freehub) and even though the wheels were new, he broke 5 spokes over the course of 2 months. After the 5th spoke popped, I just said screw it and junked the old straight gauge spokes and rebuilt it with nice DT Swiss double butted spokes and tensioned the wheel high. He hasn't had a problem with the wheel since then and that was about 8-10 months ago. I only had to do a minor truing once.

    Also big people exert a lot more torque than skinnier people. Make sure you don't do things like over extend your seat post or use cheap pedals. I don't even like extending a seat post to the insertion line with big people. I like a nice long seatpost that will extend deep into the seat tube especially on aluminum bikes.
    "When dealing with stuff like this consider that this is a bicycle, not a spaceship." -- FBinNY

  14. #14
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    I'm hoovering about 210/6'2 and ride 20/24spoke 50mm carbon rims and they do NOT flex.

    $1500 will get you a nice bike with shimano 105's in carbon or alum frame made by all of the big and little guys out there. Shop around and test ride as many bike as you can farther then just a parking lot. There are allot of 2012 stock still around and selling for 20-40% off.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Fangowolf's Avatar
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    I spent around $250 on a back wheel a few months ago. I had a bent rear derailuer that sent the whole derailuer into the spokes and fender stays of my back wheel. It turns out my frame bent before the spokes and stays gave out. My bike doesn't have a deraileur hanger and is steel, so they just bent the frame back and replaced the derailuer. The wheel guy said the wheel was still true and good. At 20-30 dollars a spoke repair, they wind up paying for themselves.

  16. #16
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    I got this bike what do you think http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...specifications

  17. #17
    Just Keep Pedaling Beachgrad05's Avatar
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    you think 200 lbs is fat?
    Move along....nothing to see here....anymore.

  18. #18
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    I think you picked a good one! Good Luck and have fun riding!!

  19. #19
    Senior Member ClydesMoose's Avatar
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    Heck of a bike Ride the crap out of it.

    At 200#, you'll be more than fine on it. Make sure you go have your wheels checked after the first 30 days/200 miles or so. They may need to be retensioned/trued.

  20. #20
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    Just curious but I'd like to get new wheels for my bike. Isn't it pretty pricey to have custom wheels built? In OP's case, it doesn't seem worth it to have new wheels built for a $350 bike, however, he could take them with him if/when he goes to sell it.

    I would agree to just get new wheels if the bike isn't being troublesome. Decent wheels are every bit as important as decent components, and probably more-so, given they're the only parts of the bike touching the ground.

    200 lbs is lightweight for the Clydes/Athena forum. I'm 5'11 and currently 212 lbs and I think I'm also one of the lighter people here. People just need to remember that just because someone's heavy doesn't mean he/she can't ride fast. I've been smoked by men and women alike who weigh closer to 300 lbs than 200 lbs. It happens.
    - Dan \m/

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