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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 02-05-13, 05:25 AM   #1
ftwelder
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Good news from a frame builder

I usually hang around in C&V or frame builders and figured I should chime in here after reading a couple of threads. Using technology from all the different genres of cycling you folks can have bikes that don't dissolve when you drop the hammer. It may be hard to find a off the shelf carbon or lugged bike but custom alloy steel or aluminum is no problem. I built a aluminum MTB frame for a 450# fella that was a pretty hardcore rider and a chopper for a famous 475# athlete. The MTB frame weighed around 6 lbs. I am showing you this one because I built it twenty years ago and hasn't been back for repair!


frame by frankthewelder, on Flickr


If you are over 400#

Profile cranks
Hadley through axle hubs (there may be others) with steel axle, 26" high profile Alex rims
custom 4130 or 6061 frame/fork with long head tube (less bearing leverage)
BMX pedals

You may still have difficulty with chains and freehub bodies/pawls but the hub will last and can be serviced. Many bike shops these days are tied to a single brand and can't even make suggestions outside their product lines. I am starting to get jobs from people who are only slightly larger than average who tell me that bike shop employees completely ignore them when they walk in the door.
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Old 02-05-13, 10:10 AM   #2
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That's pretty badass.
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Old 02-05-13, 10:54 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ftwelder View Post
I am starting to get jobs from people who are only slightly larger than average who tell me that bike shop employees completely ignore them when they walk in the door.
Oy! That sucks.

It sounds like it's working out well for you though, congrats.

That's a sharp looking frame!
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Old 02-05-13, 02:09 PM   #4
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I am 6'4", 436#, and looking for a bike to ride on my weight loss journey (started at 454 two weeks ago). I'm a high school teacher and coach, so I don't have bunch of gold bullion lying around. What might you suggest for me?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ftwelder View Post
I usually hang around in C&V or frame builders and figured I should chime in here after reading a couple of threads. Using technology from all the different genres of cycling you folks can have bikes that don't dissolve when you drop the hammer. It may be hard to find a off the shelf carbon or lugged bike but custom alloy steel or aluminum is no problem. I built a aluminum MTB frame for a 450# fella that was a pretty hardcore rider and a chopper for a famous 475# athlete. The MTB frame weighed around 6 lbs. I am showing you this one because I built it twenty years ago and hasn't been back for repair!


frame by frankthewelder, on Flickr


If you are over 400#

Profile cranks
Hadley through axle hubs (there may be others) with steel axle, 26" high profile Alex rims
custom 4130 or 6061 frame/fork with long head tube (less bearing leverage)
BMX pedals

You may still have difficulty with chains and freehub bodies/pawls but the hub will last and can be serviced. Many bike shops these days are tied to a single brand and can't even make suggestions outside their product lines. I am starting to get jobs from people who are only slightly larger than average who tell me that bike shop employees completely ignore them when they walk in the door.
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Old 02-05-13, 02:13 PM   #5
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if you can't do a custom at this time....... go for an old school, non suspension steel mountain bike. Put non knobbie, higher pressure tires on it. ride and don't worry
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