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  1. #1
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    A bit...perplexed.

    So today I got out on the roadie for 12.2 miles and averaged 11.7 mph, give or take a few tenths...

    ...I'm puzzled, to say the least. I've been really concentrating on riding more and have been doing a fair share of rides at the C&O Canal, which doesn't have hardly any elevation changes, but the pedaling is constant. I went out today on the roadie and expected to see some sort of "reward" for my efforts in terms of an easier time out there but that was not the case. Instead, I was welcomed with sheer disappointment. We have a pretty nice sized hill in the neighborhood which I figured I was going to climb with aplomb, but it was anything but. I was winded, my legs felt wobbly, and it just took it out of me. What gives? I don't have this issue on my MTB, so why the roadie? Aren't roadies supposed to be faster/easier to pedal? How come I can ride harder on my MTB than what I can on a roadie?
    - Dan \m/

  2. #2
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Hills are different. If you're not used to them, and haven't been training for them by riding at the sort of intensity they require, you're going to be slower. The weight advantage conferred by a road bike is trivial by comparison.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  3. #3
    Just Keep Pedaling Beachgrad05's Avatar
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    Not sure if this is applicable but gearing on MTB and Road Bike very different.
    Move along....nothing to see here....anymore.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    Hills are different. If you're not used to them, and haven't been training for them by riding at the sort of intensity they require, you're going to be slower. The weight advantage conferred by a road bike is trivial by comparison.
    I guess I was just expecting to have a little bit more muscle development and be able to climb the hill a little easier than what I did. It was just...disappointing.
    - Dan \m/

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Bikes target different muscles from differnt angles as well. Give yourself time to adjust. You are going form MTB to roadie, that is a big difference in position and angles.

    Heck, I went form one roadie, Cannondale to a Lemond, felt like some one was stabbing me straight on the glutes for the first few rides. It took me some time to adapt from one roadie to another. One is an aggressive crit American racing bike and the other a Euro road race type, it makes a difference.

    One good example is Gina, She averaged about 13 on her hybrid. She switched to a roadie and didn't see much difference first few rides. She didn't want to ride the roadie. I had to fight with her to give it a chance. After a couple of months, her average went up from 13-14 to her best of 18 over 42 flat miles.


    ---------------

    Another thing, keep pushing yourself close to your limit. Don't need to go all out but keep yourself challenged if even for some of your ride. Some people expect to make big gains by riding at the same intensity mile after mile. Throw in some intervals, if even 2 or 3. As you get better, throw in 5 or 6.
    Last edited by Mr. Beanz; 04-26-13 at 10:03 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member moochems's Avatar
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    I live in harpers ferry!

    Let me know (pm?) if you want to do a small group ride sometime. Plenty of hills out my way, or between boonsboro and sharpsburg, or pretty much all over Appalachia.

    I'm slow too, or maybe too slow, but either way if you would like to invite ms for a group ride I'd be happy to join.

  7. #7
    A square going nowhere psalm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Gina, She averaged about 23 on her hybrid.
    Was that with a tail wind?
    01:20:23:00
    05:23:59:00

  8. #8
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Fit can have an effect too, maybe you have it dialed in better on your MTB.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Bikes target different muscles from differnt angles as well. Give yourself time to adjust. You are going form MTB to roadie, that is a big difference in position and angles.

    Heck, I went form one roadie, Cannondale to a Lemond, felt like some one was stabbing me straight on the glutes for the first few rides. It took me some time to adapt from one roadie to another. One is an aggressive crit American racing bike and the other a Euro road race type, it makes a difference.

    One good example is Gina, She averaged about 23 on her hybrid. She switched to a roadie and didn't see much difference first few rides. She didn't want to ride the roadie. I had to fight with her to give it a chance. After a couple of months, her average went up from 13-14 to her best of 18 over 42 flat miles.


    ---------------

    Another thing, keep pushing yourself close to your limit. Don't need to go all out but keep yourself challenged if even for some of your ride. Some people expect to make big gains by riding at the same intensity mile after mile. Throw in some intervals, if even 2 or 3. As you get better, throw in 5 or 6.
    Wow, that's awesome for Gina! I guess it's just strange that an MTB would be so much easier to ride than a roadie in terms of strength. I'd expect the opposite given the aerodynamics, thinner tires (less drag), lighter weight, and "optimal" gearing for the road.

    Quote Originally Posted by moochems View Post
    I live in harpers ferry!

    Let me know (pm?) if you want to do a small group ride sometime. Plenty of hills out my way, or between boonsboro and sharpsburg, or pretty much all over Appalachia.

    I'm slow too, or maybe too slow, but either way if you would like to invite ms for a group ride I'd be happy to join.
    Hey, sounds like a plan. You need to contact the Panhandle Peddlers, they're a great bunch and my wife and I belong to the club.

    Quote Originally Posted by psalm View Post
    Was that with a tail wind?
    No wind at all.
    - Dan \m/

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    Quote Originally Posted by moochems View Post
    I live in harpers ferry!

    Let me know (pm?) if you want to do a small group ride sometime. Plenty of hills out my way, or between boonsboro and sharpsburg, or pretty much all over Appalachia.

    I'm slow too, or maybe too slow, but either way if you would like to invite ms for a group ride I'd be happy to join.
    I'm in Middletown, I'd be up for something like that.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TK LP View Post
    I'm in Middletown, I'd be up for something like that.
    This sounds like a plan! Anyone ride the C&O Canal in Shepherdstown or just on the road?

    I think a group ride would be fun but I must mention my wife and I don't ride on the public highways. We've both tried it and just don't feel comfortable doing it for a variety of reasons. If it's along a path somewhere, we're all for it!
    - Dan \m/

  12. #12
    Senior Member mr_pedro's Avatar
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    Given a grade, your weight and the power you can sustain for the duration of the climb, there will be a resulting speed. Now, your gearing needs to be such that you can go at a sustainable cadence at that resulting speed.

    Have you got any idea where you are in terms of power output and what is required to climb that hill with the gearing you have?

  13. #13
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psalm View Post
    Was that with a tail wind?
    Oh Daqg it! MY typing sucks, it was 13 mph

  14. #14
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
    Wow, that's awesome for Gina! I guess it's just strange that an MTB would be so much easier to ride than a roadie in terms of strength. I'd expect the opposite given the aerodynamics, thinner tires (less drag), lighter weight, and "optimal" gearing for the road.



    Hey, sounds like a plan. You need to contact the Panhandle Peddlers, they're a great bunch and my wife and I belong to the club.



    No wind at all.
    To be clear, my typing sucks, she did 13 on the hybrid


    stupid typing!

  15. #15
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Oh Daqg it! MY typing sucks, it was 13 mph
    We know Gina and totally believed it.

  16. #16
    Pedals, Paddles and Poles Daspydyr's Avatar
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    As mentioned above, different bikes develop muscles differently. My roadie builds taller leg muscles to me and don't do much to work my core. My MTB builds broader leg muscles and my stomach stays trimmer. IMO roadie bikes create lots less pedalling resistance and you can get greater speeds for long periods. But there is nothing like MTBing for fun and loosing yourself. I think that Sprints and intervals happen naturally on a MTB. You have to create them on a road bike.
    I think its disgusting and terrible how people treat Lance Armstrong, especially after winning 7 Tour de France Titles while on drugs!

    I can't even find my bike when I'm on drugs. -Willie N.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_pedro View Post
    Given a grade, your weight and the power you can sustain for the duration of the climb, there will be a resulting speed. Now, your gearing needs to be such that you can go at a sustainable cadence at that resulting speed.

    Have you got any idea where you are in terms of power output and what is required to climb that hill with the gearing you have?
    No clue what my power output is but it clearly isn't enough! All I know is that this hill gave me absolute hell (it didn't when I was doing more road biking a few seasons ago). A few seasons ago I was doing far more road biking and after a while it wasn't too bad, but last night just totally stuffed me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daspydyr View Post
    As mentioned above, different bikes develop muscles differently. My roadie builds taller leg muscles to me and don't do much to work my core. My MTB builds broader leg muscles and my stomach stays trimmer. IMO roadie bikes create lots less pedalling resistance and you can get greater speeds for long periods. But there is nothing like MTBing for fun and loosing yourself. I think that Sprints and intervals happen naturally on a MTB. You have to create them on a road bike.
    Yes, there is less resistance with my road bike, but that's only until I hit a good climb. I used my MTB last week on the same exact hill I had problems with last night and the MTB climbed it like a mountain goat; it was effortless. Just the whole ordeal makes me wanna throw my roadie in a dumpster, strap my hybrid tires back on my MTB, and call it a day. IMO, it's absolutely pointless to have a nice, light, carbon road bike that weighs barely 20 lbs if I can achieve greater results on a bike that not only outweighs it by at least seven pounds but isn't even designed for the road, all with nothing more than swapping out a set of tires. It's faster, easier to climb, and on the hybrid tires it damned near handles just as well.

    Yeah, I'm sure I'm coming across as a whiny crybaby who's spinning around in the living room with my arms flailing, right before I start doing "helicopters" on the floor, but it just really irritates me that I can achieve far better results on a big ol' behemoth that I can't achieve on a roadie. It's like driving a Ferrari and then being outshined on the Nurburgring by a Chevy Silverado.
    - Dan \m/

  18. #18
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
    Yes, there is less resistance with my road bike, but that's only until I hit a good climb. I used my MTB last week on the same exact hill I had problems with last night and the MTB climbed it like a mountain goat; it was effortless. Just the whole ordeal makes me wanna throw my roadie in a dumpster, strap my hybrid tires back on my MTB, and call it a day. IMO, it's absolutely pointless to have a nice, light, carbon road bike that weighs barely 20 lbs if I can achieve greater results on a bike that not only outweighs it by at least seven pounds but isn't even designed for the road, all with nothing more than swapping out a set of tires. It's faster, easier to climb, and on the hybrid tires it damned near handles just as well.
    If you can climb it on your mountain bike, but not your road bike, that suggests that your road bike isn't geared low enough. What is the gearing on your road bike? What about your mountain bike.

    Light for bicycles is over-rated. It is total rider + bike weight and unless any of us start attaching a large number of helium balloons, a few pounds difference is a very small effect.

    Oh, yeah. One last point:

    "Hills suck. Go climb hills" - The Recumbent Quant

    No matter what you do, hills are going to suck. The more you climb them, however, any given hill will start to get smaller and suck less. But don't worry. There will always be hills out there that still suck a lot.
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    If you can climb it on your mountain bike, but not your road bike, that suggests that your road bike isn't geared low enough. What is the gearing on your road bike? What about your mountain bike.

    Light for bicycles is over-rated. It is total rider + bike weight and unless any of us start attaching a large number of helium balloons, a few pounds difference is a very small effect.

    Oh, yeah. One last point:

    "Hills suck. Go climb hills" - The Recumbent Quant

    No matter what you do, hills are going to suck. The more you climb them, however, any given hill will start to get smaller and suck less. But don't worry. There will always be hills out there that still suck a lot.
    I agree there will always be hills that suck but how can one hill suck so bad on one bike and not suck on another?
    - Dan \m/

  20. #20
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    Your not alone. I was riding a comfort hybred with 26" wheels for about 9 years I could do anything on that thing it worked well for me. End of last summer I got a Specialized Tricrosss not exactly a road bike but I use it as one. Ironiclly the middle chainring is the same as the large one on the comfort bike which I used exclusively on the comfort bike and 4 or 5 of the cogs have the same teeth so I thought the switch would be unnoticable, boy was I wrong. I used the comfort bike for the sloppy roads and tails of fall and spring just selling it 2 weeks ago.

    I am getting similar results right now with the 2 bikes, actually would get about 50 watt average higher on the comfort bike (strava estimated) but a bit higher top speed and slightly more average. Hills are a wash not a big change there since I got stiff shoes that dont flex even OTS mashing up hills (if yor using flexiable street shoes I cant recommend cycle shoes enough especially for hills) and similarities of the gearing. With the shoes my feet are ever so pigeon toes so my inner thighs scream, as I never used my inner thighs much before. Body position is totally different not quite tabletop flat back but not kite in the wind straight up as I was mostly on the comfort.

    Shoot im rambling, ok long story short probably your dealing with massive changes on body positioning, pedal stroke and misc differances. It WILL hurt like hell as you condition the new muscles just remember rule 5 and you will be faster and more powerful soon!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakeyone View Post
    Your not alone. I was riding a comfort hybred with 26" wheels for about 9 years I could do anything on that thing it worked well for me. End of last summer I got a Specialized Tricrosss not exactly a road bike but I use it as one. Ironiclly the middle chainring is the same as the large one on the comfort bike which I used exclusively on the comfort bike and 4 or 5 of the cogs have the same teeth so I thought the switch would be unnoticable, boy was I wrong. I used the comfort bike for the sloppy roads and tails of fall and spring just selling it 2 weeks ago.

    I am getting similar results right now with the 2 bikes, actually would get about 50 watt average higher on the comfort bike (strava estimated) but a bit higher top speed and slightly more average. Hills are a wash not a big change there since I got stiff shoes that dont flex even OTS mashing up hills (if yor using flexiable street shoes I cant recommend cycle shoes enough especially for hills) and similarities of the gearing. With the shoes my feet are ever so pigeon toes so my inner thighs scream, as I never used my inner thighs much before. Body position is totally different not quite tabletop flat back but not kite in the wind straight up as I was mostly on the comfort.

    Shoot im rambling, ok long story short probably your dealing with massive changes on body positioning, pedal stroke and misc differances. It WILL hurt like hell as you condition the new muscles just remember rule 5 and you will be faster and more powerful soon!
    Well, now that everyone's mentioning it, I have thought about it and my posture on my roadie is far more different than that of my posture on my MTB. It does make sense that I'd be using a different muscle group. With the roadie I feel it more in my upper legs than lower legs, just the opposite from my MTB.
    - Dan \m/

  22. #22
    Just Keep Pedaling Beachgrad05's Avatar
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    I am curious as to gears on both your MTB and road bike.

    For example here are the cranks and cassette on my MTB
    Crankset Shimano Alivio, 42/34/24 teeth
    Rear Cogs 7-speed, 11 - 28 teeth

    My hybrid
    Crank Shimano M171, 48/38/28 w/chainguard
    Cassette Shimano HG40 11-32, 8 speed

    my roadbike
    Crank Shimano R565, 50/34 (compact)
    Cassette Shimano Tiagra 12-30, 10 speed

    MTB are designed to climb mountain trails so gears are set up that way and might explain why it felt like it didn't require the effort the road bike does.

    and as others mentioned body positioning plays a role and what muscles are being pressed,into,service.
    Move along....nothing to see here....anymore.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Are both computers calibrated for your tire size?

  24. #24
    just pedal donalson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    Are both computers calibrated for your tire size?
    this was my first thought... I ride running my GPS on my phone and recently added a speed sensor... apparently I need to re calibrate the sensor because it's almost 10% off after comparing the two after a ride.
    mtbr clyd moderator

  25. #25
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    Performance can vary from day to day as well. Rest, hydration, previous meals can all make a difference. Don't be so hard on yourself.

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