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  1. #1
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    20 weeks to go from 10 miles at a time to a Century?

    I'm preparing for the Apple Cider Century on September 29. I'm currently averaging 6-10 miles per ride. What kind of mileage increases should I be making? They also have shorter rides (37, 50, 75), so I could opt for one of those if I'm not fully ready.

  2. #2
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    You can make quite large percentage increases early on. If you're comfortable doing ten miles, I'd suggest moving up in increments of five miles per week. So, next week make your long ride 15 miles, stick with that for two weeks, 20 miles the week after that stick with that two weeks, then 25 the one after that and move up five miles a week thereafter. Keep that up and as the rides get longer, the perecentage gains get smaller, which is as it should be. In just over three months you be up to 60-70 miles, and at that point you'll be ready to do a century and can just consolidate. Even better, that schedule gives you plenty of time to spare, so if some weeks you don't make the gains you expect, it's no big deal.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  3. #3
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
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    Right noe you need time on the bike. I would start by getting 4-5 1 hour rides during the week and one long ride on the weekends. I would try adding a half hour each week to my long ride till you get up to 4 hours. You ought to be somewhere in the metric range at that point. From there you can really start training for the century. You should see your miles increasing on your hour rides as you go and try at some point to throw in power building sessions on your shorter rides.

    but for now till you build up, just focus on spending time on the bike

  4. #4
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassjones View Post
    I'm preparing for the Apple Cider Century on September 29. I'm currently averaging 6-10 miles per ride. What kind of mileage increases should I be making? They also have shorter rides (37, 50, 75), so I could opt for one of those if I'm not fully ready.
    Here's a suggested training plan to get to a 100k ride. If you substitute miles for km it looks like it should work pretty well, assuming you've got the time to do that many long rides.

    http://www.avantiplus.co.nz/pluszone...-training.html
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  5. #5
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    Way more than enough time. Just go put miles on the legs.
    Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.

  6. #6
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    I got ready for a 60 mile ride in 8 weeks. I followed Bike New York's 8 week plan and it worked well. Basically, I rode both base miles and long ride miles each week.



    Train as if you are going to ride the 100 mile ride. If you need to fall back to a shorter ride, do it (but you really have enough time). Just make sure you train on the same or more difficult terrain as the ride (e.g., don't train on flat terrain for a hilly ride).

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  7. #7
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    I am well overweight and mid 50's. The longest ride this spring was about an hour, and maybe four to six hours total, over six weeks. But my bucket list included riding the 40 mile NYC 5 Boro this past weekend. Mission accomplished! I did walk partially on some of the steep bridge ramps, but felt great afterwards. Oh I forgot, on Saturday I also road an hour, so that's a lot of riding for me.

    Keep at it and you'll be in great condition for your first century. Good luck!
    Last edited by oddjob2; 05-08-13 at 10:10 PM.
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  8. #8
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    I would start by getting 4-5 1 hour rides during the week and one long ride on the weekends. I would try adding a half hour each week to my long ride till you get up to 4 hours.
    It's easy to over think training for a century. I fretted about it last year before my first one and finally found some very basic advice about making sure you ride at least 200 miles in each of the months leading up to it. (more would be better of course) if you can ride 70 miles in one sitting you can probably accomplish a century with similar terrain.

    There's a directly relevant thread on the long distance forum here: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ding-a-Century

    Once you get to the point where you're riding 50+ miles you'll want to figure out your nutrition & drinking plan but you can come back later with those questions.

  9. #9
    Senior Member MattFoley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    (e.g., don't train on flat terrain for a hilly ride).
    This. Last year, my father-in-law did the 59 mile route of a large organized ride and had a really tough go of it. He'd done some pretty long rides beforehand, so he felt good about the distance, but the problem was that he had done all his training rides on a pancake-flat loop, but the actual ride was over rolling terrain. So not only was his fitness not built up for the added hills, but he also hadn't gotten any practice with climbing technique, so he was mashing up all the hills. My wife was riding with him and tried to coach him, but he was pretty beat up and demoralized, so it didn't really take. So yeah, don't avoid the hills.
    Cars man, whyyyyyy?!?!?!?!

  10. #10
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    We don't have any hills here to train on... The ride is in Southwestern Michigan, so it's pretty flat there too.

  11. #11
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    It's easy to over think training for a century. I fretted about it last year before my first one and finally found some very basic advice about making sure you ride at least 200 miles in each of the months leading up to it. (more would be better of course) if you can ride 70 miles in one sitting you can probably accomplish a century with similar terrain.
    One reason its easy to overthink training for a century is that some cyclists have a bug in their chamois about how important it is. Six weeks ago I had someone tell me I'd hurt my training for a century in September by doing a 5k run/walk in April. If I'd not known that 'wisdom' to be utter nonsense I'd be overthinking it too.

  12. #12
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassjones View Post
    I'm preparing for the Apple Cider Century on September 29. I'm currently averaging 6-10 miles per ride. What kind of mileage increases should I be making? They also have shorter rides (37, 50, 75), so I could opt for one of those if I'm not fully ready.
    Hmm. We are riding centuries the same day. We should compare notes during training.

  13. #13
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil_B View Post
    Hmm. We are riding centuries the same day. We should compare notes during training.
    Sure thing. BTW, I'm doing a 10K charity walk on Saturday, then the Century on Sunday...

  14. #14
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Best of luck.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  15. #15
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    Something that takes a long time to build up is core strength. Weight on your arms and hands really takes a toll on long rides. As you get fatigued, you'll tend to lock your elbows maybe without even realizing it. I plan to cross train with rowing machines to build core and upper body endurance.

  16. #16
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassjones View Post
    Sure thing. BTW, I'm doing a 10K charity walk on Saturday, then the Century on Sunday...
    I can't even look on your awesomeness. "I'm not worthy! I'm not worthy!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by bassjones View Post
    Sure thing. BTW, I'm doing a 10K charity walk on Saturday, then the Century on Sunday...
    You might reconsider this. A century can take a lot out of you, especially if it's your first one. Unless you have a lot of base miles udner your belt. Try to increase your miles up the 25, then 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, and then 80. The base miles and training is the key and to be frank, though the walk on Saturday is great on paper, not sure if it's the best thing for a century for the next day.
    Feel free to visit my blog www.chefonabicycle.com

  18. #18
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
    You might reconsider this. A century can take a lot out of you, especially if it's your first one. Unless you have a lot of base miles udner your belt. Try to increase your miles up the 25, then 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, and then 80. The base miles and training is the key and to be frank, though the walk on Saturday is great on paper, not sure if it's the best thing for a century for the next day.
    I'm currently walking 2-4 miles 3 days a week, so the 10K walk won't be that big a deal.

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    Sounds good bro! You got both in the bag! For the century, its all about getting those base miles in, dialing in pre, during and post eating and hydration.
    Feel free to visit my blog www.chefonabicycle.com

  20. #20
    Senior Member bassjones's Avatar
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    It's an organized century with 5500 entrants and lots of aid stations and water/food stops.

  21. #21
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassjones View Post
    I'm currently walking 2-4 miles 3 days a week, so the 10K walk won't be that big a deal.
    Not to mention you will be in that much better shape then too.

  22. #22
    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    Just make sure you keep training for BOTH. If you quit walking to spend all the time training on the bike, I would think you would start the century out with VERY sore legs after walking a 10k the day before. Have fun with the whole thing!
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not the sport for you!

  23. #23
    Senior Member JackoDandy's Avatar
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    I rode a century (miles) last year. Without a doubt, the biggest issue for me was saddle time training. Saddles that felt comfy at rides less than 40 miles were living torture at 40+ miles. Your bike fit takes on a whole different feel when you get into the longer rides. You really need to be in the saddle for 5+ hours to discover this. For training, I would ride at least one 40-50+ mile ride per week, with hills. On ride day I was doing well until mile 70 and the heat got to me a little. By mile 80 I was crashing physically, but by mile 90, I was so determined that I crossed the finish line on pride alone.

    100 miles is a long distance. If you respect the distance and train accordingly, you should be fine

  24. #24
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    This question gets asked here a lot and one thing that would be helpful when folks do ask is giving some indication of the route. Lots of centuries don't have that much climbing and the amount of climbing makes a ton of difference because that's what really takes the "punch" out of your legs if you're not prepared. Lots of people, myself included, attack climbs with a bit too much vigor early in the season only to tire, necessitating a slowdown toward the end of the ride.

    But if there's not a ton of climbing in a ride, 100 miles isn't nearly as daunting as it sounds. You can easily train for something like that by doing a series of 10-15 mile sprints, going as hard as you can each time. If you do these often enough, you'll build up the leg strength and general stamina that you need to do a relatively flat century.

  25. #25
    Senior Member JackoDandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafzali View Post
    This question gets asked here a lot and one thing that would be helpful when folks do ask is giving some indication of the route. Lots of centuries don't have that much climbing and the amount of climbing makes a ton of difference because that's what really takes the "punch" out of your legs if you're not prepared. Lots of people, myself included, attack climbs with a bit too much vigor early in the season only to tire, necessitating a slowdown toward the end of the ride.

    But if there's not a ton of climbing in a ride, 100 miles isn't nearly as daunting as it sounds. You can easily train for something like that by doing a series of 10-15 mile sprints, going as hard as you can each time. If you do these often enough, you'll build up the leg strength and general stamina that you need to do a relatively flat century.
    +1
    If your ride is mainly bike paths, its a lot easier to do 100 than actual road riding, though still an accomplishment

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