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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 05-11-13, 05:04 AM   #1
ChuckHubbert
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Tires and maybe a wheel set

I ride a Motobecane CXX, that I got this spring. It my first "good" bike, and I'm really liking it.

My focus goal is a 5 day/250 mile tour in ver early August. I am almost positive that I want to put different tires on. I'm also thinking about a wheel upgrade, if I can afford it.

Here is what I have now:

Rims Alex DA16 Doublewall Aluminum on Deore hubs
Tires Ritchey Cross Comp Speed Max 700X32C wire bead

I am at 304 lbs right now, and run a full 75psi in the tires. I ride about 75% unpaved roads around home, but the tour is all asphalt.

Thoughts, ideas, suggestions, discussions?
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Old 05-11-13, 06:29 AM   #2
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I'm running Panaracer Pasela Tourguards http://www.ebikestop.com/panaracer_p...eel-TR2247.php on my Cross Check in 35mm size. I think maybe 75 psi is on the low side for the rear tire for you. If you're mechanical I'd suggest a http://www.ebikestop.com/park_tool_t...ter-TL7426.php. With even spoke tension those wheels will last a long time.
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Old 05-11-13, 06:31 AM   #3
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Old 05-11-13, 06:36 AM   #4
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Those tires and wheels are fine for your intended use. I'd ride 'em; if you want other wheels/tires, I'd go to an LBS that you trust and have them build you a set of bullet proof wheels designed for the kind of riding you do. Velocity makes good rims; some of the Mavic rims would work for you as well.
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Old 05-11-13, 11:14 AM   #5
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Old 05-11-13, 12:16 PM   #6
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Interestingly, the rear hub is listed as a Deore with 130mm spacing.
Deore is a mountain hub, typically spaced @ 135MM. "Road" hubs are spaced @ 130mm.
IF you buy a wheel set, verify the rear spacing ON YOUR BIKE to make sure it is correct.

The dilemma you have is that skinnier tires don't work well in loose dirt/gravel etc.

IF you were riding exclusively on paved roads, I'd recommend a 28mm tire that will handle 100+ PSI.

I don't see much cost/benefit in upgrading your rims for your riding conditions. You'd have to spend too much money to save a couple oz.

I WOULD spend a few $ at the LBS and have your spokes properly tensioned. That can greatly extend wheel life & prevent/delay spoke problems. Especially if they are <36 spoke rims.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 05-11-13 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 05-11-13, 01:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckHubbert View Post
I ride a Motobecane CXX, that I got this spring. It my first "good" bike, and I'm really liking it.

My focus goal is a 5 day/250 mile tour in ver early August. I am almost positive that I want to put different tires on. I'm also thinking about a wheel upgrade, if I can afford it.

Here is what I have now:

Rims Alex DA16 Doublewall Aluminum on Deore hubs
Tires Ritchey Cross Comp Speed Max 700X32C wire bead

I am at 304 lbs right now, and run a full 75psi in the tires. I ride about 75% unpaved roads around home, but the tour is all asphalt.

Thoughts, ideas, suggestions, discussions?
Buy another set of wheels and make them road-specific with a good set of tires (think Michelin Pro 25's or something similar that is tour-or-race friendly). That way you can have your cake and eat it too. That's the beauty of CX bikes...
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Old 05-11-13, 04:28 PM   #8
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Great fodder for my recreational frettin'. Thanks, so far.

I've got a couple hundred miles on the bike now. I did have the bike set up by a shop, including checking the spokes and wheels, but I am interested in the tool to check tension myself.
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Old 05-11-13, 04:31 PM   #9
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I think maybe 75 psi is on the low side for the rear tire for you.
The side walls on the Ritchey's are marked 75psi max. Can I exceed that, and if so, what would I be looking at for max then?
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Old 05-11-13, 05:13 PM   #10
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here's a well known chart.
http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
Using a 40% front 60% rear split.
If you extrapolate this chart with 32 mm tires then somewhere around 95-100 psi for the rear. If you got a 37mm tire you'd be down in the 75 psi range. The 32's would handle the front at 75 psi so you could use the rear as a spare front tire.
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Old 05-11-13, 06:55 PM   #11
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I used to ride Vittoria Randonneur Cross tires. They come in a 35c which my guess is the size you'd want. Low rolling resistance (even lower than the Vittoria Randonneur Pro which I tried as well) on road and slight tread for off. Even did my first century on them. Never had a flat in several thousand miles of riding.

Ideally with you may want to think about a bit wider tire if you can fit one on the bike.


If you can wait a few weeks the new Schwalbe Little Big Ben might work well. There are few reviews as it's new and back ordered right now. Rivendell has a review here. Picture here.
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Last edited by stevel610; 05-11-13 at 07:12 PM.
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