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  1. #1
    Senior Member Jarrett2's Avatar
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    Wider pedals/Better Grip?

    I did a 6 mile ride Sunday morning and it was a little misty out and my pedals got wet along the way. I started noticing my feet slipping around on them some. I wondered if there were wider, stronger, better traction pedals out there. The pedals in question are black plastic stock pedals that came with my Specialized Expedition Sport. Thanks!

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    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Switch to clipless pedals and shoes. In this day and age, when you can get pedals, shoes, and cleats for less than $100, why wouldn't you switch?

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    Senior Mumbler steve2k's Avatar
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    You can certainly get pedals with more grip - my mountain bike has metal ones with teeth that are very grippy but also very painful if you bash one into your shins.

    Clips are the other obvious choice that way your foot and the pedal are connected, but they're not for everyone.

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    Senior Member moochems's Avatar
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    Clipless pedals go a long way to improving the comfort of my ride. When clipped in I never slip around on the pedals, regardless of conditions.

    There is a learning curve, and you must appreciate the increased likelihood of falling while you get used to them.

    I have some old welgo pedals on an old ten speed, I'll often wear some motorcycle boots when I ride that bike. The shoes grips the pedals extraordinarily well. To get an idea of the boots sole that I talk about, you can check out Aerostich.com and look at there combat lite boots with the cleated sole.

    I wouldn't recommend getting a pair as the price is just not worth it for bicycling. Also, while they are great for pedaling, I'm sure better could be had for cheaper.

    The shoes you wear while riding might have most of the impact on slipping on the pedals.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jarrett2's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I wear a size 14 EEEE. Fairly big/wide shoes. I don't want to go to clips even if they have shoes in my size. I really don't like the idea of my feet being stuck to the pedal. Just looking for a wider pedal with a little more grip to it at this point.

  6. #6
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Half step pedals tend to offer far better traction... a wider platform also provided better support and with 14EEEE shoes you need a different pedal and a well made one too boot as you probably put a lot more stress on the pedal spindle than your average person.

    MKS probably sells the best non clipless pedals on the market, a Sylvan touring pedal might be wide enough and is surely strong enough and the Lamda, although odd looking, is a great pedal for very wide feet.

    You can find either for around $30.00 - $35.00

    MKS Sylvan



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    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    If you don't want to go clipless (and that's fine), then consider half-clips (just over the front of the foot to make sure your foot doesn't slip off the front).

    One thing I'll caution about some of the "grippier" pedals is that they grip so well, you get no float (ability to turn your foot). That isn't a problem for many people, but for some it can be a big problem (if you switch and you start having knee pain, then you might be one of the unlucky ones).
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    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    you might like miniclips and pedals with teeth
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    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    Thanks for the info. I wear a size 14 EEEE. Fairly big/wide shoes. I don't want to go to clips even if they have shoes in my size. I really don't like the idea of my feet being stuck to the pedal. Just looking for a wider pedal with a little more grip to it at this point.
    VERY smart man!! Clipless belongs on the race course not on the street.

    These pedals from Nashbar are just the ticket for you! Won't slip , wide enough for any foot and very well made.

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_549650_-1___
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
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  10. #10
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    VERY smart man!! Clipless belongs on the race course not on the street.

    These pedals from Nashbar are just the ticket for you! Won't slip , wide enough for any foot and very well made.

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_549650_-1___
    What a surprise? Really! I had no idea you didn't like clipless pedals. How come you've never said anything before?

    To the OP: the pedals he lists here are the ones I was commenting about above. For most people, they are fine. However, they grip so well there is no float, if you do get them, just listen to your knees.

    If you are concerned, the mini-clips (or half clips)and pedals shown by rumrunn6 are a good way to go.
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  11. #11
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    VERY smart man!! Clipless belongs on the race course not on the street.
    Incorrect.

    But I do respect that people can exercise choice and run the pedals they prefer to.

  12. #12
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    Thanks for the info. I wear a size 14 EEEE. Fairly big/wide shoes. I don't want to go to clips even if they have shoes in my size. I really don't like the idea of my feet being stuck to the pedal. Just looking for a wider pedal with a little more grip to it at this point.
    So you like the idea of your feet slipping around...and off...the pedals more? If you don't want your feet to slip off, go with clips or go clipless. Clipless pedals aren't nearly as bad as people think they are. They don't just belong on the race course but are extremely useful for every day riding including ... GASP!...city riding. I find platforms to be much more dangerous because of pedal slipperiness than being trapped in clipless. Slipping of a pedal at 30 mph is a painful experience.
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  13. #13
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    I was just thinking about this same thing. I have size 12 EEEE feet and I am so glad that there are clipless pedals. I have been riding with toe clips from 1972 to the late 80's. I used Campy Nuovo Record pedals with the clips. The pedals and clips alway felt too small width-wise. Now with clipless I use Sidi mega shoes and these fit very well and the pedals are not confining on the sides either.

    I will never return to a platform pedal or a quill pedal. They just feel too narrow.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    I received 2 pair of these today-
    http://www.amazon.com/Redline-Lo-Pro.../dp/B004DAROLG
    3-3/4" wide at the spindle x 3-1/2" long.
    I don't know how that compares to what you have.

  15. #15
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    Thanks for the info. I wear a size 14 EEEE. Fairly big/wide shoes. I don't want to go to clips even if they have shoes in my size. I really don't like the idea of my feet being stuck to the pedal. Just looking for a wider pedal with a little more grip to it at this point.
    I use the Nashbar Land Cruiser pedals... I'm a size 13.

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...46_-1___202363

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    What a surprise? Really! I had no idea you didn't like clipless pedals. How come you've never said anything before?

    To the OP: the pedals he lists here are the ones I was commenting about above. For most people, they are fine. However, they grip so well there is no float, if you do get them, just listen to your knees.

    If you are concerned, the mini-clips (or half clips)and pedals shown by rumrunn6 are a good way to go.
    I have wide feet and have a problem with heel strike on my right foot due to a problem with my ankle muscles. I am first wondering what pedal float is and why pedal float is desirable.

    I have plenty of pushing power with my right leg and foot but my ability to lift my right foot is badly compromised due to an injury from over a year ago. I lost the ability to lift my foot up so I have a mild case of foot drop. Anyway, when I used smaller pedals, my foot would twist in such a way that my heel would strike the crankarm all the time. I discovered that if I used really wide BMX pedals, the problem goes away so that is my solution. I end up wearing boots that give me some ankle support as well as an ankle brace while I ride. The pedals i use have those pins and keep my foot pretty solidly placed on the pedals. My left foot points normally but my right foot points out while riding.

    So in a nutshell, what is pedal float and how does my riding style affect it?
    "When dealing with stuff like this consider that this is a bicycle, not a spaceship." -- FBinNY

  17. #17
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobotech View Post
    I have wide feet and have a problem with heel strike on my right foot due to a problem with my ankle muscles. I am first wondering what pedal float is and why pedal float is desirable.

    I have plenty of pushing power with my right leg and foot but my ability to lift my right foot is badly compromised due to an injury from over a year ago. I lost the ability to lift my foot up so I have a mild case of foot drop. Anyway, when I used smaller pedals, my foot would twist in such a way that my heel would strike the crankarm all the time. I discovered that if I used really wide BMX pedals, the problem goes away so that is my solution. I end up wearing boots that give me some ankle support as well as an ankle brace while I ride. The pedals i use have those pins and keep my foot pretty solidly placed on the pedals. My left foot points normally but my right foot points out while riding.

    So in a nutshell, what is pedal float and how does my riding style affect it?
    I have similar issues with my right leg and foot... without being clipped in my foot will drift forward and my heel will point inwards.

    Pedal float is a term to describe how much lateral movement the pedal allows laterally to allow for changes in leg position and for most, float is desirable as it is better for your knees to have this little bit of room.

    Road cyclists tend to lean toward less float while mountain bikers like more float as they tend to move around a lot more on the bike, stand on the pedals, etc.

  18. #18
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bobotech View Post
    I have wide feet and have a problem with heel strike on my right foot due to a problem with my ankle muscles. I am first wondering what pedal float is and why pedal float is desirable.

    I have plenty of pushing power with my right leg and foot but my ability to lift my right foot is badly compromised due to an injury from over a year ago. I lost the ability to lift my foot up so I have a mild case of foot drop. Anyway, when I used smaller pedals, my foot would twist in such a way that my heel would strike the crankarm all the time. I discovered that if I used really wide BMX pedals, the problem goes away so that is my solution. I end up wearing boots that give me some ankle support as well as an ankle brace while I ride. The pedals i use have those pins and keep my foot pretty solidly placed on the pedals. My left foot points normally but my right foot points out while riding.

    So in a nutshell, what is pedal float and how does my riding style affect it?

    I have similar issues with my right leg and foot... without being clipped in my foot will drift forward and my heel will point inwards.

    Pedal float is a term to describe how much lateral movement the pedal allows laterally to allow for changes in leg position and for most, float is desirable as it is better for your knees to have this little bit of room.

    Road cyclists tend to lean toward less float while mountain bikers like more float as they tend to move around a lot more on the bike, stand on the pedals, etc.
    I agree with 65er on this. You can also consider pedal extenders which move the pedals out from the cranks to help deal with issues exactly like you have.

    If you have no issues with your foot being fixed to the pedal and you like what you have, then besides suggesting mini/half clips, I don't see any reason to change. Float in your case might be a bad thing and you also may (or may not) find it difficult to unclip given your injury.

    I find clipping in is much more comfortable. I ride a SWB recumbent, so my feet are elevated which makes clipping in even more nice/useful/helpful/... I don't think there is a one-size-fits-all solution to pedals.
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  19. #19
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    What a surprise? Really! I had no idea you didn't like clipless pedals. How come you've never said anything before?
    Just staying on message. Just staying on message I am!
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
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  20. #20
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Switch to clipless pedals and shoes. In this day and age, when you can get pedals, shoes, and cleats for less than $100, why wouldn't you switch?
    A) Sometimes I like to wear regular shoes

    B) All my riding is in the city. 8 miles each way, with a stop sign or stop light every 5 blocks for almost all of that. I'd be clipping in and clipping out constantly.

    C) Some buildings don't allow cleats inside.

    D) Fear of falling over.

    E) Ability to re-position feet on pedals to alleviate discomfort. With clipless you are stuck with only one position.


    To the OP: I've been researching large platform pedals, I'll share with you my list. This is still preliminary, a lot of these I still need to do research on their durability/suitability, but all the below I've found while looking for large platforms:

    Kona Wah Wah super durable, large
    DMR Vault very large 115mm square
    Nukeproof Neutron
    Performance Fort Platforms
    Wellgo B132? $50 light, tough
    Wellgo Detox
    Wellgo 143 107mm x 100mm
    Deity Compound very light, rebuildable $48 not concave
    Canfield Crampons: Platform: 101mm wide x 106mm
    The Loaded Precision pedal 100mm x 110mm
    Atomlab GI
    Straitline De Facto
    NRG Tasters Choice
    Blackspire Sub 4
    Superstar Nano's top marks 105mm x 100mm x 17mm
    Forte Convert/HT Nano series

    Hope this helps!

    Whatever you get, take a few minutes to take them apart when you get them and put a liberal coating of grease on the bearings. It's extremely common nowadays for manufacturers to save money by not greasing the bearings at the factory. Even cheap pedals will last a lot longer with grease, and expensive ones can have a very short lifespan without grease! Of course, some will come with sealed units and you'll be off the hook there.

    Some of the above are pretty pricey to be sure, but some are fairly reasonably priced. If the pedal is rebuildable and lasts a long time to begin with, then it is worth multiple pairs of cheap pedals wearing out IMO. You shouldn't have any problems with grip with any of the pedals I've listed, they are mountain bike pedals, those spikes in them keep your feet on the pedals.

    From your post it sounds like your are interested in more surface area for the pedal, if you are feeling that it is difficult or uncomfortable to keep your feet so close together I can't recommend pedal extenders enough. They've made a world of difference for my comfort in riding.
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 05-29-13 at 06:30 PM.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    E) Ability to re-position feet on pedals to alleviate discomfort. With clipless you are stuck with only one position.
    I've just switched to Speedplay Light Action pedals due to having terrible knees. Not even platforms kept me pain free. Nothing gives you more positions than them. But they do have the most annoying cleats ever.

    But, yeah, no pedal is a panacea, and right tool for the job is the best advice. There are pretty much as many pedal choices as saddle choices and it is just as much a personal choice.

  22. #22
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    A) Sometimes I like to wear regular shoes
    To each his own.

    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    B) All my riding is in the city. 8 miles each way, with a stop sign or stop light every 5 blocks for almost all of that. I'd be clipping in and clipping out constantly.
    Mine is 10 miles in city and I hardly ever unclip. I do stop at all stop lights and stop signs as well. I just don't unclip. It's called a "trackstand"

    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    C) Some buildings don't allow cleats inside.
    I have yet to see anywhere that tells me that I can't wear clipless shoes into their buildings. That includes about 4000 miles of touring throughout the US as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    D) Fear of falling over.
    "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me."

    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    E) Ability to re-position feet on pedals to alleviate discomfort. With clipless you are stuck with only one position.
    No, you aren't stuck in one position.
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  23. #23
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    A) Sometimes I like to wear regular shoes
    Me too. That is why I ride clipless on one side, platforms on the other. But, any ride longer than 5 or 6 miles is much more comfortable on clipless, IMO.

    B) All my riding is in the city. 8 miles each way, with a stop sign or stop light every 5 blocks for almost all of that. I'd be clipping in and clipping out constantly.
    Much of my riding is urban, or MUP with lots of intersections. Clipping out/clipping in is as natural as taking my foot off the pedal.

    C) Some buildings don't allow cleats inside.
    That is why I wear mountain style shoes and cleats. Really, you have lots of options for cleated shoes these days, many that look just like sneakers or sandals.

    D) Fear of falling over.
    What does clipless have to do with falling over? Seriously. IMO, toeclips are far more of a danger than are clipless. As for platforms, feet slipping off the pedals when going downhill on a wet road strikes me as far more of a danger than the slight risk of falling over at a slow speed because I forgot I was wearing clipless.

    E) Ability to re-position feet on pedals to alleviate discomfort. With clipless you are stuck with only one position.
    I experienced far more discomfort from riding platforms for long distances. The sole on my court or running shoe is just too flexy for optimal foot comfort. The stiffer sole of a cycling shoe combined with being locked into the pedal greatly reduced foot discomfort for me. Also, because my foot isn't jammed up against a toeclip, my toes feel much better after a long ride in clipless than they ever did with toeclips.

    To each his own, I guess.

  24. #24
    Senior Member ndredsox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Switch to clipless pedals and shoes. In this day and age, when you can get pedals, shoes, and cleats for less than $100, why wouldn't you switch?
    What brand(s) would you recommend for this price?

  25. #25
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndredsox View Post
    What brand(s) would you recommend for this price?
    For $41 Shimano M324 is a nice pedal option, . http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...0#ReviewHeader If price is really a concern, Nashbar sells these for less than $30. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...0#ReviewHeader
    I have used a pair of Wellgo pedals (pd 1024 I believe)for about 5 years that have served me well. Not sure know why I picked Wellgo over Shimano, but I suspect that a few years ago, LBS charged a premium for Shimano, so my first pair of clipless was Wellgo, and I didn't feel comfortable buying pedals off the internet. Anyhow, they have served me well, and I don't perceive any quality difference between my Wellgo and Shimano Pedals.

    As for shoes, I wear now discontinued Nike mountain bike shoes. Just bought a pair of Nashbar mountain bike shoes for my wife for about $60 recently. Too soon to say how they are as she has only worn them a few times. Shimano is always a good bet. Really, whatever fits at that price point is what you should go with. If 43 is your size, these Pearl Izumis look pretty nice. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...70_-1___202526

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